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  • 1.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Värdefull om än överteoretiserande avhandling om vägen till fördjupat lärande: Recension av avhandlingen Lärande av rörelseförmåga i idrott och hälsa ur ett praktikutvecklande perspektiv av Heléne Bergentoft (Göteborgs universitet 2019)2020In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, article id 9 aprilArticle, book review (Other academic)
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  • 2.
    Graffman-Sahlberg, Marie
    et al.
    Katedralskolan, Uppsala.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Learning health in Swedish physical education: A critical case study of students’ encounters with physical fitness and health as a learning object2019In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, p. 227-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interfaces between health, physical education and schooling have a long history. Critical questions are being raised about the enforcement of learning a particular health practice in school physical education (PE). The present study departures from a practice-based research project evaluating a pedagogical model. The aim of the case study was to explore upper secondary students' learning and understandings of a specific learning object, aerobic fitness and how this influences health, after participating in a period of a longer lab work in the context of Swedish physical education. A phenomenographic approach was used when analyzing the students' written reports to identify and distinguish the variations of learning outcomes and understandings that emerged. Expectations of physical performance created tensions, and even conflicts, between the student-centred assignments and existing traditions within the field of physical education. The findings underscore the risk of neoliberal logics underpinning health education in the learning culture of PE. Further studies are needed where teaching methods/models and student learning are paid attention to in order to move away from teaching to be healthy towards students learning about health and make sense of themselves as healthy. This may offer new educational perspectives.

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  • 3.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Sport, physical education and physical activities among youth in Sweden: a polarization of participation in school and in leisure time2019In: AISEP International Conference 2019 Book of abstracts, 2019, p. 379-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Jansson, Alexander
    et al.
    Malmö University.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Norberg, Johan
    Malmö University.
    Assessing Students' Perceived Learning and Contentment in Physical Education: A Scale Development Study and Structural Equation Modeling Analysis.2019In: Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, ISSN 1091-367X, E-ISSN 1532-7841, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 280-290Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although students' perceived learning is central in physical education (PE), few measurements are available. Furthermore, little is known about how students' perceptions of PE effect students' perceived learning in PE. Therefore, the aim was to develop a scale to assess students' perceived learning and a measurement to assess students' perceived contentment in PE, and furthermore, to analyze the interrelationship between students' perceived learning and students' perceived contentment in PE. A total of 1203 students in Sweden who were aged 12–16 years participated. The results from the exploratory (n = 601) and confirmatory (n = 602) factor analyses as well as the validity and reliability analyses showed that there was psychometric support for the one-dimensional model perceived learning in PE and for the three-dimensional model perceived contentment in PE. The structural equation modeling analyses showed that both competence and joyfulness were directly and positively related to students' perceived learning. 

  • 5.
    Redelius, Karin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Physical education teacher education in Sweden2019In: European physical education teacher education practices: initial, induction, and professional development / [ed] Ann MacPhail, Deborah Tannehill, Zuleyha Avsar, Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2019, p. 379-396Chapter in book (Other academic)
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  • 6. Markkola, Gunilla
    et al.
    Ruhn, Anita
    Antskog, Kurt
    Antskog, Bibbi
    Lindblom, Gerd
    Lindblom, Erik
    Schantz, Peter
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Greger Carpelan: 1923-20172017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
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  • 7.
    Gurholt Pedersen, Kirsti
    et al.
    Department for Physical Education, Norges Idrottshögskola, Norge.
    Bischoff, Anette
    Institutt for friluftsliv, idrett og kroppsøving, Universitet i Sørøst, Norge.
    Mygind, Erik
    Department of Geosciences and Natural Resource Management, Forest and Landscape College, Danmark.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Nordic Master in Friluftsliv Studies (Outdoor Studies): An invitation to Students Worldwide2018In: Pathways. The Ontario Journal of Outdoor Education, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 25-27Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Brun Sundblad, Gunilla
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    “Learning nothing” in Physical Education and Health (PEH)?: a nine year follow-up study2018In: Physical Education and Sport help build a Healthy Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

     “Learning nothing” in Physical Education and Health (PEH)? – a nine year follow-up study

    The school subject Physical education and health (PEH) has during the last decades been under debate in several countries. Reports claim that students learn sport but not health. Literature also points to a gap between curriculum, pedagogy and assessment. Changes in society show new scenarios around health, wellbeing and illness among young people, and a growing uneven distribution of access to physical activity and knowledge in health. This leads to questions about students’ learning experiences from school PEH.

    The aim of the presentation is to, with the help of a nine year follow-up study, describe and analyze students’ attitudes to participation and learning in PEH over the school years.

    Method

    The study was based on a population from randomly selected schools in Sweden, with students born 1991, 1988 and 1985. The year of the baseline study was 2001. Follow-up studies were made three, six and nine years later. The collecting of data was made by a self developed and adopted questionnaire with closed and open answers.The presentation will focus on the follow up study of the students born 1991, made six and nine years after the base line study. In 2010, 75% of the original population (1290) answered a revised, almost identical questionnaire. Frequency of data was analysed with descriptive statistics and cross tabulations. Chi-square was used for examining group differences *p<0.05 **p<0.01, ***p<0.001.Values >0.05 were considered as statistically non-significant (n.s.)

    The results show a significant difference in participation pattern between male and female students, where 18% of the female students in relation to 8% of the male students, never or very seldom participated in PEH in their older ages. From 15 to 18 years of age, one third of those who experience that they learned “nothing” remained in this category. Leaving school, 21% of the students at the age of 18 thought that they knew well how to train and be physically active by their own. 2 out of 10 regarded themselves as not having this knowledge. Over one third of the students were uncertain of the relationships between health, life style and environment. The students’ general attitudes towards PEH in upper secondary school, as described in the open answers, have been categorised in two main themes: a request to get the opportunity to become more engaged in school physical activity, and a claim for a restructuring of  how PEH is organised and taught.

    Conclusions

    One conclusion from the study is the need for defined and understandable learning tasks with learning outcomes possible to be shared and assessed by both teachers and students. Possible pedagogical models will be discussed with the departure point from the concept health literacy and curriculum theory.

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  • 9.
    Thedin Jakobsson, Britta
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    A Disrupted Landscape for Participating in Youth Club Sport and PE in Sweden2018In: Physical Education and Sport help build a Healthy Society, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Societal and technological changes have an impact on habits related to youth sport and leisure time. The internet-based character of leisure time has created new practices. Young people have to navigate within a disrupted landscape of time, place and space. The aim of this study is to explore views of leisure time, sport activities and PE participation among students aged 15. The results will be discussed from a critical sociocultural perspective with focus on how culture, structure and agency intersect. The findings will also be discussed in relation to a similar study conducted in 2007.

    The project is a follow-up, cross-sectional study based on a longitudinal research project named School – Sport – Health, initiated in 2001. Eight semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted in 2016 (30 boys, 18 girls), based on a strategic sample of four schools that participated in 2001. Two of the schools reported high levels of physical activity among the students, and two schools reported low levels of physical activity. An inductive qualitative content analysis guided the procedure for analyzing the empirical material.

    The results show that school and friends are central to the way students handle leisure time involving physical activities. The students strive to be independent, to experience development and belonging, all of which challenge the way organized sports are planned. For a number of students, club sports are still a dominant part of their leisure time, however not uncontested. Internet-based activities allow flexibility, where one can choose to interact across time, place and space, as well as across gender and age. The value of school PE is highlighted in terms of health and wellbeing. The results indicate tension between physical activities in a school setting and leisure time physical activities. Content and quality are related to experienced agency and structure. Schoolwork, experienced lack of time and development, play a more central role in students’ experiences of everyday life physical activities in 2016 compared to results from 2007.

  • 10.
    Thedin Jakobsson, Britta
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    A disrupted landscape for participating in youth club sport: A study of changes in sport and leisure time activities2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Several societal and technological changes have affected youth sport and leisure time habits. The netification of leisure time has created new practices and young people have to navigate within a disrupted landscape of time, place and space.

    The overall aim of the study is to explore 15 year old students’ view on leisure time and sport activities. The results will be discussed from a critical sociocultural perspective with a focus on how culture, structure and agency intersect. The  indings will be compared to a similar study conducted in 2007.

    Methods

    The study is a follow-up, cross sectional study based on a longitudinal research project named School – Sport – Health, starting in 2001. Eight semi structured focus group interviews were conducted in 2016 (30 boys, 18 girls), based on a strategic sample of four schools that participated in 2001. An inductive qualitative content analysis guided the analyzing procedure of the empirical material.

    Results

    The findings show that school and friends frame what leisure time can be and are central departure points for how to act and handle leisure time activities. Lack of time interferes with the participation in organized club sport. The adolescents drive to become independent, to experience development and belonging challenge the way organized sport is figurate. Netbased activities represent flexibility, where one can choose to interact across time, place and space, as well as across gender and age. Club sport is still, for a number of students a dominant part of their leisure time, but not uncontested.

    Conclusions

    The findings indicate a new tension around leisure time content and quality related to practice, agency and structure. Furthermore school work and the feeling of lack of time and development, play a more central role in the teenagers’ everyday life year 2016 compared to the results from 2007.

  • 11.
    Thedin Jakobsson, Britta
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Participation patterns in Swedish youth sport.: A longitudinal study of participants aged 10-19 years.2018In: Swedish Journal of Sport Research, ISSN 2001-6018, E-ISSN 2001-9475, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 25-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden almost everyone participate in youth sport at one time or another. In recent years, however, overall participation rates have declined and many stop early. The aspiration of the sport confederation as well as the Swedish state is that young people should stay longer in sport which raises questions about participation patterns during adolescence, the ease of joining a sport club, and the barriers to remaining a participant. Drawing on a nine-year longitudinal study, this article reports on the participation patterns among a group of 241 youth that were followed from 10 to 19 years. They took part in four surveys (when they were 10, 13, 16 and 19 years of age). The results show a clear polarisation, one fourth did not take part at all or had only participated for a short time, one fourth participated all the time from the age of 10 to 19. Few started after the age of 10. The pathways for those continuing were characterised by diversification and not specialisation.

  • 12.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Avhandling som på ett intressant sätt väver samman olika sociologiska perspektiv på mäns tal om och förståelse av hälsa, kropp och fysisk aktivitet: recension av avhandlingen “I have a pacemaker and hip replacement, but I’m up and running”: Rural Norwegian men’s meanings related to health, body and physical activity av Stein Egil Kolderup Hervik2018In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, article id 15 marsArticle, book review (Other academic)
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  • 13.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Brun Sundblad, Gunilla
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Sport, PE and physical activities in Sweden: a polarization of high and low participation in school and during leisure time2017In: Changes in Childhood and Adolescence: Current Challenges for Physical Education / [ed] Claude Scheuer et al., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sport, PE and physical activities in Sweden – a polarization of high and low participation in school and during leisure time

    Suzanne Lundvall, Gunilla Brun Sundblad, The Swedish school of sport and health Sciences, GIH, STOCKHOLM

    Introduction

    During the last decades several changes in society have affected young people’s physical activity (PA) habits. These changes deal not only with processes of urbanization and choice of schools. They also deal with new forms of communication and screen activities influencing young people’s everyday life, including when, where and how young people are physically active. Parallel with this systematical reviews have shown that physical active students have a better physical and mental health than inactive students. As the rate of participation in club sport among children and adolescents have gone down during the last years in Sweden, questions arise of who is physically active and/or inactive during school and leisure time, as well as what the contribution is from physical education and health (PEH). The aim of the study has been to examine Swedish students and their physical activity (PA) habits during and after school time, including participation in physical education and health (PEH). Another aim was to examine students learning experience in PEH. The results of the study are discussed in relation to results from a similar study from 2001 (The School-Sport- Health study).

    Method

    Method used was a questionnaire with open and closed questions about participation and learning in school PEH, daily physical activity during school time, as well as questions about sport club participation and screen activities. The sample of schools was based on a previous study from 2001 with randomly, by the Swedish Bureau of Statistics, selected schools. In total 1203 students, aged 12- and 15- years, from 24 schools participated.

    Results

    A group of 21% (n=256) of the students (62% boys and 38% girls) answered that they were very physically active and participated in club sports over 6 times/week, or over 10 h/week. At the same time a group, just under 21% (250) of the students (equally distributed between gender), reported themselves as physically inactive. A higher amount of girls with foreign background were found in the inactive group. The inactive students were represented in schools, independent of a high or low socioeconomic status. 40% of students knew about school organized PA during the school day. Of these, half of them participated, mainly younger (boys) and already sports active student. Two third of the students spent more than 2 hours per day with screen actives during the school week days. The time spent with screen activities during the weekend was high, and higher than in 2001. Among the inactive group, 35% spent more than 6 hours per day in front of a screen.18% of the very physically active group did the same. Students self-report a higher PA level during PEH-lessons compared with earlier surveys. The students also describe to a higher extent than in earlier surveys, learning experiences that represent theoretical knowledge of physical health and the learning of all-round movement competence and fitness training. Less than 1% of the students declare that they never participate in PEH.

    Discussion

    The polarization between the very physically active and non-active group has grown. Students describe that they learn about (physical) health and a healthy active life style. Surprisingly few declare that they don’t participate in school PEH. This result needs to be followed up by succeeding studies. There is overall a positive attitude to PEH among the students that can and should be used. School PEH emerge as a resource for PA and health, whereas daily physical activities are underused. Every fifth student choose away from club sport. Screen activities has increased dramatically. In summary, there is a need for a strategy of meaningful participation in physical activity in daily life that involves school, parents and club sport to support a health enhancing environment for all young people.

    References

    Bailey, R., Hillman, C., Arent, S. et al.. (2013).”Physical activity: An underestimated investment in human capital?”, Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 10(3), 289–308.

    Larsson, H. & Karlefors, I. (2015). ”Physical education cultures in Sweden: Fitness, sports, dancing ... learning?”. Sport, Education and Society, 20(5), 573–587.

    Heath, G. W. et al.. (2012).”Evidence-based intervention in physical activity: Lessons from around the world”. The Lancet, vol. 380, nr. 9838, s. 272–281.

  • 14.
    Mikaels, Jonas
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Mygind, Erik
    University of Copenhagen.
    Dettweiler, Ulrich
    University of Stavanger.
    Outdoor and environmental education research – a critical exploration into ontology, epistemology, methodology and methods: Book of Abstract : PhD Summer School in Outdoor Studies 2017 Stockholm, Sweden, May 2-62017Other (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The PhD Summer School aims to bring together PhD students, and some of their supervisors, from various disciplines in the field of outdoor studies. This includes education (both teaching and learning), environmental education, learning outside the classroom, udeskole, leisure and recreation. The seminar aims to build on the social, cultural and critical dimensions of research and theorising in diverse outdoor practices.

    This year’s seminar builds upon previous PhD summer schools, hosted by Copenhagen University in partnership with University of Edinburgh in 2015, and Technische Universität München in 2016. The focus will be to share and explore the diversity of outdoor and environmental education research going on amongst the participating PhD students and supervisors.

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  • 15.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Brun Sundblad, Gunilla
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Polarisering av ungas idrottande2017In: De aktiva och de inaktiva: om ungas rörelse i skola och på fritid / [ed] Christine Dartsch, Johan R Norberg & Johan Pihlblad, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2017, p. 45-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Skillnaderna i fysisk aktivitet mellan svenska skolelever är stora. Cirka 20 procent idrottar inte alls på fritiden, en lika stor andel är mycket aktiva. En stor majoritet deltar på lektionerna i idrott och hälsa. En procent väljer att inte alls vara med. Hur resonerar unga om idrott, träning och ämnet idrott och hälsa och vad kännetecknar olika elevgrupper?

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  • 16.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Transformative pedagogy in physical education and the challenges of young people with migration backgrounds2016In: Routledge Handbook of Physical Education Pedagogies / [ed] Catherine D. Ennis, Routledge, 2016, p. 356-367Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides an overview of scholarship dealing with ethnicity and cultural diversity in relation to PE. It identifies two central themes that have occupied scholars over the last two decades: Muslim girls’ experiences, and teachers’ preparedness to respond to increasing cultural pluralism. It also takes in a small number of investigations focusing on the experiences and perceptions of young people from minority groups. In synthesizing this literature, the chapter underscores recurring issues, central findings, and implications for practitioners, as well as identifying themes that require further theoretical and practical attention.

  • 17.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Barker, Dean
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap vid Göteborgs universitet..
    The Swedish model for sport, recreation and health in times of change - a sustainable contract with the family of sport?2016In: Families, Young People, Physical Activity and Health: Critical Perspectives / [ed] Symeon Dagkas, Lisette Burrows, Routledge, 2016, p. 194-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The newly-elected Swedish minister of public health and sports, Gabriel Wikström is holding his first official speech to the Swedish Sports Confederation at a Sports Forum. Wikström is a social democrat and 29 years old. He has one message: that the sports movement should help decrease existing health gaps in society. The audience looks somewhat puzzled; what has organized sport to do with health gaps? After the minister has left, a strategic discussion starts about the sports movement’s assignment. Few of the delegates from the different sports federations rate the promotion of health as their main target. Instead, they are interested in attracting new members, keeping adolescents in sport longer, and securing the existence of non profitable clubs as the foundation for a united popular movement vis-à-vis political decision-makers. The speech of the sports minister points, on the one hand, to the expectations from the state on how organized sports and the Swedish Sports Confederation (Riksidrottsförbundet, RF) can promote public health. On the other hand it also points to concerns about public health and physical activity brought about by changes in society, neo liberal discourses and a strong belief in individual and market forces.

  • 18.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Mattsson, Torun
    Malmö högskola.
    Some early and later female pioneers in physical education, dance and sports in Sweden: three different portraits2016In: Inspirational Women in Europe: Making a difference in Physical Education, Sport and Dance / [ed] Rosa Diketmüller, Juiz de Fora: NGIME/UFJF , 2016, p. 86-124Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    According to the latest Gender Gap Report by the World Economic Forum, Sweden is one of the most equal countries in the world (www.weforum.org). The equality is described by for example the proportion of women working outside the home and their economical distribution. The Swedish parliament has also one of the world’s highest representation numbers of women parliament members. To be able to understand this development of equality, factors like a long period with a social democracy government and a strong popular movement are often put forward as explanations for the Swedish gender policy development. But an unproven hypothesis is also that the early education of both men and women in bodily exercise and physical activity played a role in this development. The purpose of this chapter is to pay attention to three Swedish women who, through their engagement in physical culture and sports in different time periods, made difference to the lives for girls and women. The first pioneer, Martina Bergman Österberg, established a female Physical Education Teaching Training Program (PETE), the second, Ann Elefalk, broke the way for female coaches in a male dominated sport and the third Cecilia Dahlgren brought dance into compulsory schools in Sweden. The three portraits differ, but together they illustrate how education, passion and strategies can move mountains.

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    Complete book
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    Chapter: Some early and later female pioneers...
  • 19.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Intressant som kunskapsbank, men provokativ utifrån ett nordiskt perspektiv: Recension av boken Health and Elite Sport: Is High Performance Sport a Healthy Pursuit? / Joseph Baker, Parissa Safai & Jessica Fraser-Thomas (red). Routledge 20152016In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 7 aprilArticle, book review (Other academic)
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  • 20.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik: praktiknära idrottsdidaktik2016In: Hur är det i praktiken?: Lärare utforskar ämnet idrott och hälsa / [ed] Håkan Larsson, Suzanne Lundvall, Jane Meckbach, Tomas Peterson & Mikale Quennerstedt, Stockholm: Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH , 2016, p. 5-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad ska elever lära sig i idrott och hälsa? Hur lägger man upp undervisning som stödjer alla elever i deras lärande? Hur kan lärare göra likvärdiga bedömningar av elevers kunskaper? Detta är några av de frågor som behandlas i boken du nu håller i. Boken sammanfattar den forskning som genomförts inom Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik (FIHD). FIHD startade år 2011 som ett led i den statliga satsningen Lärarlyftet, där särskilda medel avsattes för genomförandet av forskarskolor för lärare och förskollärare. Deltagarna i FIHD är alla verksamma lärare i idrott och hälsa. Detta har en central betydelse i sammanhanget. Skolämnet idrott och hälsa har funnits länge i den svenska skolan, men den vetenskapliga förankringen och utforskningen av ämnet har varit svag. Den forskning som existerat har inte i första hand genomförts av, eller på initiativ av, lärare i ämnet. Initiativen har istället kommit från annat håll, ofta från olika myndigheter. Forskningsresultaten har speglat myndigheternas intressen snarare än lärarnas. Därför är det ett stort nöje att i denna bok få möjlighet att presentera forskningsresultat som bygger på lärares frågor och där lärare har varit forskare. I detta inledande kapitel presenterar FIHD:s styrgrupp, bestående av medarbetare vid Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Malmö högskola och Örebro universitet, bakgrunden till FIHD, den forskning som fanns till hands då lärarna påbörjade sina forskningsprojekt samt de ambitioner som varit förknippade med forskarskolan.

  • 21.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Gender dynamics in the making and breaking of a female PETE culture in Sweden2016In: The Female Tradition in Physical Education: Women First reconsidered / [ed] David Kirk, Patricia Vertinsky, Routledge, 2016, p. 153-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Idrott och hälsa : en undervärderad investering (?)2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Tidén, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Movement Assessment Tools: A Critical Examination2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    In contemporary society there are calls to increase young people’s physical activity. In the wake of this concern we find a growing interest in studying and assessing children’s and adolescents’ movement abilities. Consequently, there are a number of tools developed for assessing children’s movement abilities. However, many scholars have suggested that ability is far from a neutral concept and the notion of ability is often taken for granted as simply a measureable and observable capacity. The aim with this study is to critically examine assessment tools used for healthy and typically developed children. (Evans, 2004; Hay & Macdonald, 2013; Wright & Burrows, 2006).

    Methods

    The examination comprises ten tools from six different countries. In the study we pay special attention to selected movement tasks in the tools and the evaluation methods. The theoretical framework is inspired by Bourdieu’s concepts of habitus and capital, (Bourdieu, 1988) which are used as analytical tools. The analysis explores and discusses what kind of movement ability the tools may construct.

    Results

    The findings show both a great variation of concepts and evaluation methods and a narrow view of what is regarded as valuable to assess. The assessment tools are strongly related to traditional sports and represent a specific form of physical capital. Rhythm and dance, for example, are never or seldom assessed, neither movements in a broader perspective as open skills or movement tasks taking place in an outdoor environment. The examined tools and tests assess a limited number of decontextualised movements and produce a narrow view of movement ability.

    Discussion

    The study gives an overview of what kind of movements and abilities that is valued and promoted in movement assessment. Evaluation processes often promotes a child who is physically mature and benefits those who have experience of traditional sports. In other words, the assessed ‘taste for sport’ and the ‘embodied physical capital’ construct what is considered to be legitimate knowledge in relation to movement culture. Accordingly, the construction of movement ability through assessment tools could affect how children see themselves and their ‘ability’. The results raises questions about how the assessments influence children’s desire to move or their interest for physical activity in broader perspectives.

    References

    Bourdieu, P. (1988). Program for Sociology of Sport. Sociology of Sport Journal, 5, 153-161.

    Evans, J. (2004). Making a difference? Education and ‘ability’ in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 10, 95-108.

    Hay, P.J., & Macdonald, D. (2013). Evidence for the social construction of ability in physical education. Sport Education and Society, 15, 1-18.

    Wright, J. & Burrows, L. (2006). Re-conceiving ability in physical education: a social analysis. Sport Education and Society, 11, 275-291.

  • 24.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Schantz, Peter
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, The Research Unit for Movement, Health and Environment.
    200 years of physical education teacher education: An overview of movement practices2016In: Researching Embodied Sport: Exploring Movement Cultures / [ed] Ian Wellard, Oxon, England: Routledge, 2016, p. 30-46Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
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  • 25.
    Mikaels, Jonas
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Backman, Erik
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    In and out of place: exploring the discursive effects of teachers' talk about outdoor education in secondary schools in New Zealand2016In: Journal of Adventure Education and Outdoor Learning, ISSN 1472-9679, E-ISSN 1754-0402, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 91-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore and problematise teachers’ talk about outdooreducation in New Zealand. The focus is on what can be said, how it is said and thediscursive effects of such ways of speaking. The inquiry draws on Foucauldiantheoretical insights to analyse interview transcripts derived from semi-structured interviewswith eight outdoor education teachers who work at secondary schools in NewZealand. Findings suggest that different discourses co-exist and are intertwined in theparticipants’ talk. Associated with a dominating discourse of adventure are subdiscoursesof risk and safety, pursuit-based activities, skill and assessment. Connected to adiscourse of learning are subdiscourses of environment, sustainability and socialcritique. Resistance towards a dominating discourse of adventure with pursuit-basedactivities can be traced in a discourse of learning in the form of a more placeresponsivepedagogy.

  • 26.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Approaching a gender neutral PE-culture? An exploration of the phase of a divergent PE-culture: Gender in Physical Culture: Crossing Boundaries – Reconstituting Cultures2016In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 640-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the phase of the divergent physical education (PE) culture in Sweden through the enactment of gender and how boundaries are formed and defended by symbolic mediating status and monopolization of resources. The study departures from a literature review with an inductive approach. Inspired by the method of critical incidents technique specific events have been studied to explore the longitudinal phase and the enactment of gender. Five critical incidents demonstrates how difference and similarity were created, maintained and contested, but also how the dismantling of gender differences came to be enacted and socially configured in space and time. The findings of the study point to a slow-but-still ongoing phase of dissolving symbolic and social boundaries. Going for a gender-neutral PE culture in the future seems to require our ability to both be gender sensitive and gender bend in order to transgress traditional gender order.

  • 27.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Fagrell, Birgitta
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Gör läraren skillnad2011In: Idrott & hälsa : organ för Svenska idrottslärarföreningen, ISSN 1653-1124, no 4, p. 3p. 16-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Tiden, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Thedin Jakobsson, Britta
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Bedömningsstöd idrott och hälsa årskurs 4-62014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Som stöd för bedömning i idrott och hälsa i årskurs 6 finns ett material som ger tydliga exempel på bedömningar av de kunskaper som eleverna visar upp utifrån kunskapskraven. Bedömningsstödet syftar till att konkretisera delar av kunskapskraven genom elevexempel och lärares samtal kring bedömning.

  • 29.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Physical Culture, PETE and the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences: A 200-year perspective2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Estetik och rörelse i skolan: om relationen mellan dans och gymnastik2015In: Kunskapande i dans: Om estetiskt lärande och kommunikation / [ed] Britt-Marie Styrke, Liber, 2015, 1, p. 39-52Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    How does ’physical literacy’ resonate with ’human practising’?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Tidén, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    The social construction of ability in movment assessment tools.2017In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 697-709Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper focuses on how 'ability' is conceptualised, configured and produced in movement assessment tools. The aim of the study was to critically analyse assessment tools used for healthy and typically developed children. The sample consists of 10 tools from 6 different countries. In the study, we pay special attention to content and evaluation methods. The theoretical analysis explores and discusses what kind of movement ability the tools construct. The theoretical framework is inspired by Bourdieu's concepts of habitus, capital and field which are used as analytical tools to explore how the testing processes and content shape what is regarded as ability. Our findings show both a great variation of concepts and evaluation methods and a narrow view of what is regarded as valuable to assess. The assessed movements are strongly related to traditional sports and construct a specific form of physical capital. None of the tasks assessed take place in natural outdoor environments. Open skills, rhythmical movements to music or tasks including a wider range of flexibility are also absent in the assessment tools. The explored tools and tests assess a limited number of decontextualised movements and produce a narrow view of 'ability'. Hence, the testing process itself often promotes a child who is physically mature and benefits those who have experience of traditional sports. In other words, the assessed 'taste for sport' and the 'embodied physical capital' construct what is considered to be legitimate knowledge in relation to movement and physical culture. Accordingly, the social construction of movement ability through assessment tools is far from a neutral concept and could affect how children see themselves and their 'ability'.

  • 33.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Viktigt om ungas fysiska aktivitet: recension av boken Young People, Physical Activity and the Everyday av Jan Wright & Doune Macdonald (red)2012In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 18 aprilArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Från gymnastikdirektör till lärare i idrott och hälsa2012In: Idrottsdidaktiska utmaningar / [ed] Larsson, H. & Meckbach, J, Stockholm: Liber, 2012, 2, p. 250-265Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Tid för dans2012In: Idrottsdidaktiska utmaningar / [ed] Larsson, H. & Meckbach, J, Stockholm, Stockholm: Liber, 2012, 2, p. 103-119Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Meckbach, Jane
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Idrottsdidaktik - konsten att undervisa idrott2012In: Idrottsdidaktiska utmaningar / [ed] Larsson, H. & Meckbach, J, Stockholm: Liber, 2012, 2, p. 17-35Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Physical literacy in the field of physical education: A challenge and a possibility2015In: Journal of sport and health sciences, ISSN 2095-2546, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 113-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Publications of articles with physical literacy as topic have increased dramatically since the beginning of 2000s. The aim of this paper is to, through an explorative literature overview with an inductive approach, analyze frequent, and significant themes in published peer reviewed articles, with a focus on physical literacy. The database EBSCO has been used with the identifiers “physical literacy” and “physical literacy and evidence”. Furthermore ICSSPE Bulletin's special issue on physical literacy has been included in the overview. The findings have resulted in three key themes: assumptions of the concept physical literacy and its educative role, sports development and physical literacy, and assessment and physical literacy. Future studies are needed to examine if the advocated pedagogical strategies based on the concept physical literacy have led to a re-organized and revitalized school subject. There is also an existing critique towards making physical literacy an idealistic neutral concept or synonym with fundamental movement skills or sports talent identification. The role of higher education emerges as crucial for the next step of the development of the scientific framework as this involves how physical literacy will be socially configured, nurtured, and embodied in practice.

  • 38.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Antologi som problematiserar maskulinitet och femininitet inom idrott och fritid: recension av Kjønnsmakt i idrett og friluftsliv / Gerd von der Lippe & Hans K. Hognestad (red)2015In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 8 majArticle, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Från Idrottsforum:

    Den 28 mars 2012 publicerades på idrottsforum.orgs (1.0) löpsedel följande nyhet: ”Vi nås av det nedslående beskedet att Gerd von der Lippes karriär på Høgskolen i Telemark ’nærmer seg slutten’. Det är svårt att tro att denna otroligt vitala, initiativrika och kritiska forskare ska kunna sluta vara just det, och vi förväntar oss åtskilligt fler interventioner framöver. Vid hennes Høgskole har man i alla händelser beslutat arrangera ett symposium om kön och makt inom idrott och friluftsliv till hennes ära, ’Hva er nytt under solen? Symposium om kjønn og makt i idrett/ friluftsliv’.” Mot bakgrund av dessa rader kan vi idag konstatera två saker. För det första att det blev åtskilligt fler interventioner, och akademiska aktiviteter av olika slag, från von der Lippes sida. Nämnvärt i sammanhanget, utöver en artikel om Nanna With på idrottsforum.org, är hennes engagemang i Ship to Gaza-kampanjen, en intervention som gett eko i och utanför forskarvärlden, och i den palestinske fotbollsspelaren Mahmoud Sarsaks öde – han definierades som jihadkrigare av den israeliska säkerhetstjänsten, nästan hungerstrejkade sig till döds, och släpptes så småningom fri. von der Lippes synpunkter och åsikter i dessa frågor kan man med fördel ta del av i en intervju av Peder Samdals, här. Tjänstgörande redaktör har vid mer än ett tillfälle (särskilt minnesvärt var det i Umeå) lyssnat på von der Lippe i seminarier och druckit hennes skål på efterfester. Jag har sett denna en gång norska mästare på 100, 200 och 400 meter göra en enhandsvolt, 70 år fyllda! Nåväl, för det andra, att konferensen sannolikt var framgångsrik, att döma av att det sedan en tid föreligger en välmatad antologi med publicerade konferensbidrag. Festföremålet själv, tillsammans med Hans Hognestad, har redigerat Kjønnsmakt i idrett og friluftsliv (Novus forlag). Vi gav den nya boken till en meriterad svensk forskare på området, Suzanne Lundvall vid GIH, och hennes insiktsfulla läsning ovh väl genomförda recension ger bilden av en bok som man svårligen kan bortse från om man vill förstå hur kön och makt samspelar inom idrott och friluftsliv.

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  • 39.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    From Ling Gymnastics to Sport Science: The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, from 1813 to 20132015In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 789-799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2013, the former Royal Gymnastic Central Institute, now the Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences (GIH), celebrated its bicentenary. The purpose of this paper is to describe, by means of a literature review, the holding blocks that have contributed to the continuity of the oldest institute for PE teacher education in the world. For the first hundred years Ling gymnastics represented a legitimate system for the schooling of the body, the promotion of health and the rehabilitation of the sick. This resulted in strong markers of exclusivity, keeping the institution together. The next hundred years saw the discontinuity of Ling gymnastics, including medical gymnastics, and a call for sport education. The new cornerstones were exercise science research and the establishment of the Institute as an autonomous university college with the assignment to meet society's continued need for knowledge of how to support healthy citizens. Today's challenges for GIH include dealing with a changing society, the conflicting dimensions of (competitive) sport, and the more philanthropic ideas of body and physicality.

  • 40.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Kraepelien Strid, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Predictors of adolescent fitness levels among Swedish adolescents, a longitudinal study2012In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, p. S185-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: It has been consistently demonstrated that low aerobic fitness is causally linked to increased cardio-metabolic risk. Aerobic fitness has also been causally related to cognitive function. From adolescence and onwards, the inter-individual stability ("tracking") in fitness is fairly high. An individual's fitness level in adolescence is therefore a central determinant for future health. However, childhood predictors of adolescent fitness levels are largely unknown. The present study aimed at identifying personal, school-specific and structural determinants in childhood (age 10 yrs) for adolescent aerobic fitness (at age 16 yrs).

    Methods: Body mass index-based overweight status (normal weight vs overweight/obese, according to Cole et al.) and gross motor skills (based on the Tidén-Nyberg test) were measured at baseline in 209 Swedish children (mean [SD] age 9.8 [0.60] yrs) from randomly selected schools on Sweden. Immigration status (self-report) and average household income in quartiles on community level (register obtained) were used as possible structural confounders. Data on educational status of the PE teacher and lesson structure (gender-separated vs mixed classes) was obtained from the PE teacher. At the reexamination (at age 15.8 [0.33] yrs), aerobic fitness was estimated using the Åstrand-Ryhming nomogram. Low aerobic fitness was defined as below the first quartile (29.7 mL x min-1 x kg-1). Risk for low aerobic fitness was assessed using logistic regression

    Results: Risk for low aerobic fitness at follow-up was lower in children who were normal weight (OR: 0.23.95% CI: 0.10 to 0.49) and in children with trained PE-teachers (OR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.93), but higher among children with poor gross motor skills (OR:1.84, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.13) at baseline. Gender, immigration history, neighborhood economical status and lesson structure were all non-significant predictors of low adolescent fitness.

    Discussion: The results stress the importance for early overweight prevention and treatment and for professional identification and treatment of children with impaired gross motor skills at young ages. In Sweden, a lagre proportion of PE-teachers in lower grades lack formal PE-teacher education, which according to the present study poses a threat to children's future health. Early screening and treatment of children with limited motor proficiencies seems may help children adapting a physically active lifestyle and avoiding low fitness levels in adolescence and young adulthood.

  • 41.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Kraepelien Strid, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Predictors of perceived competence in physical activities (PCPA) among Swedish adolescents, a longitudinal study2012In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, p. S113-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: An individual's perceived competence in physical activities (PCPA) has been proven a powerful predictor for future physical activity. However, the perception of one¥s competence may differ over time, especially during childhood and adolescence but also between types of physical activities or tasks. Further, the predictors for PCPA are largely unknown, but overweight status and gross motor skills have been proposed as candidates. We sought to identify predictors for general PCPA in Swedish adolescents, and PCPA in three highly prevalent forms of physical activities in Swedish physical education (PE), namely swimming, aerobics and soccer.

    Methods: Body mass index-based overweight status (normal weight vs overweight/obese, according to Cole et al.) and gross motor skills (based on the TidÈn-Nyberg test) were measured in 352 Swedish children (160 girls and 192 boys) at baseline (age 10). Immigration status (self-report) and average community household income level (quartiles, register obtained) at 10 yrs were used as possible socio-cultural confounders. Data on educational status of the PE teacher responsible for education at age 10 yrs was obtained by self-report from the teachers. Self reported data on general PCPA and PCPA in soccer, swimming and aerobics at 16 yrs was obtained at follow-up and predictors for PCPA was identified using logistic regression.

    Results: Being overweight or obese (OR: 2.27, 95% CI: 1.18–4.38) and attending PE classes with unqualified teachers (OR: 2.41, 95% CI: 1.36–4.27) at age 10 yrs were both risk factors for low general PCPA a age 16 yrs. Concerning the selected activities, being overweight or obese at age 10 yrs predicted low PCPA in swimming (OR: 2.67, 95% CI:1.31–5.46) but not in the other activities at age 16 yrs. Poor gross motor skills at age 10 yrs predicted low PCPA at 16 yrs only in soccer (OR:1.48, 95% CI: 1.02–2.13). Female gender (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.13–0.38), and higher socioeconomic status (OR: 0.71 per quartile, 95% CI: 0.55–0.92)at age 10 yrs were both found to be associated to lower risk for low PCPA in aerobics.

    Discussion: Overweight status and educational status of the PE teacher both affect the risk of having low general PCPA. The effect of gender, overweight status, gross motor skill and socio-economy seem to differ between specific activities, indicating that PCPA may be task specific in adolescents. These results may serve as background when planning physical activity interventions. Further, they stress the need for professional PE teachers to teach in younger classes.

  • 42.
    Graffman-Sahlberg, Marie
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Brun Sundblad, Gunilla
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Teaching Health for Understanding?: A phenomenographic analysis of learn-ing experiences2014Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Learning experiences in Physical Education and Health : a longitudinal study2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH: a 200 year old history of continuity and discontinuity2013In: ISHPES Bulletin, Vol. 43, no August, p. 9-10Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Maivorsdotter, Ninitha
    et al.
    Högskolan i Skövde.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Kroppsliggörande, estetik och genusdidaktik2014In: Lärande i handling: en pragmatisk didaktik / [ed] Britt Jakobson, Iann Lundegård, Per-Olof Wickman, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2014, 1:1, p. 153-162Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Learning experiences in Physical Education and Health : a longitudinal study2014In: Global Forum for Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy. / [ed] Mingkai Chin and Edgington, Christopher, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim:

    Health and Physical education (HPE) has during the last decades been under debate. Reports claim that students learn sport but not health. Changes in society show new scenarios around health and a growing uneven distribution of access to physical activity. This leads to questions about students’ learning experiences from school HPE.

     

    The aim of the study has been, with the help of a nine year follow-up study, to describe and analyze students’ attitudes to participation and learning in HPE over the school years.

    Method The study was based on a population from randomly selected schools in Sweden, with students born 1991, 1988 and 1985. The year of the baseline study was 2001. Here the focus is on the students born 1991, and the follow up made six and nine years after the base line study. The method used was questionnaires with both closed and open answers. In 2010, 75% of the original population (1290) answered a revised, almost identical questionnaire. Data has been analyzed with descriptive statistics and cross tabulations. Chi-square was used for examining group differences.

    Results The results show a significant difference in participation pattern between male and female students, where 18% of the female students in relation to 8% of the male students never or very seldom participated in HPE in their older ages. From 15 to 18 years of age, one third of those who experience that they learned “nothing” remained in this category. Leaving school, 21% of the students at the age of 18 thought that they knew well how to train and be physically active by their own. 2 out of 10 regarded themselves as not having this knowledge. Over one third of the students were uncertain of relationships between health, life style and environment. The open answers to questions about general attitude towards PEH in upper secondary school resulted in two main categories: the value of having possibilities to engage in physical activity during the school week, and the need to restructure how HPE is organized and taught. The results point to a questioning and restructuring of existing programs in PEH.

  • 47.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Learning experiences in Physical Education and Health : a longitudinal study,2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical Education has during the last decades been under debate in several countries. Reports claim that students learn sport but not health. Alongside with this, changes in society show new scenarios around health, wellbeing and illness among young people, and a growing uneven distribution of access to physical activity and knowledge in health. This leads to questions about students’ learning experiences from school PE. The aim of the presentation is to, with the help of a nine year follow up study, describe and analyze students’ attitudes to participation and learning in PE over the school years. The study consists of a population from randomly selected schools in Sweden, with students aged 9, 12, and 15, in the year of the baseline study, 2001. Follow-up studies were made three, six and nine years later. In 2010, 75% of the original population (1290) answered a revised, almost identical questionnaire. The results show a significant difference in participation pattern between male and female students, where 18% of the female students never or very seldom participates in PE in their older ages, in relation to 8% of the male students. From 15 to 18 years of age, one third of those who experience that they learned “nothing” remained in this category. Leaving school, 21% of the students at the age of 18 thought that they knew well how to train and be physically active by their own. 2 out of 10 regarded themselves as not having this knowledge at all. Over one third of the students were uncertain of relationships between health, life style and environment. Those who scored themselves as very active in the age of 12, were also the ones most stable over the years, with the female students being the most stable. Future challenges for PE and health will be discussed.

     

     

  • 48.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Physical activities and their relation to physical education: A 200-year perspective and future challenges 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A female PETE culture was gradually established in Sweden during early 1900s. It was built on a division of gender with separate PETE programs for male and female students. The aim of the proposed text is to describe and analyze the challenge of gender constructions and crossing of boundaries that the change from single sex to co-educated programs brought about during late 1970s. The analyze is done from three points of reference: 1/What concrete forms of changes occurred during and after the process of integration, 2/ What values came to be represented?, 3/What power structures remained after the merging of the two former PETE cultures? The empirical material consists of annual reports, curricula documents, film sequences and interviews with former PETE educators. The analyses will departure from a gender perspective and draw on Foucault’s productive concept of power and Bourdieu’s analytical concepts of symbolic capital and symbolic violence. The conclusions are discussed in the light of current time and the field of sport and physical culture.

  • 49.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    The making and breaking of a female PE culture2014In: The making and breaking of a female PE culture / [ed] Partricia Vertinsky, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Tidén, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    The social construction of ability in movement assessment tools2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    THE SOCIAL CONSTRUCTION OF ABILITY IN MOVEMENT ASSESSMENT TOOLS

    Anna Tidén

    Karin Redelius

    Suzanne Lundvall

    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Studies, Stockholm, Sweden (GIH)

    The notion of ability is often taken for granted as simply a measureable and observable capacity. Consequently, there is a number of assessment tools developed for evaluation children’s movement abilities. However, many scholars have suggested that ability is far from a neutral concept. The aim with this study is to investigate how ability is conceptualized and socially configured in a number of movement tests. Questions of particular interest are: What are the purposes of the tests? What kinds of evaluation methods are used and what movement ‘abilities’ are valued? Different assessment tools used in research and education have been examined regarding purpose, content, and assessment orientation. The tests have been analyzed from a sociocultural perspective and Bernstein’s models of pedagogies and Bourdieu’s concept of physical capital have been used. Preliminary findings indicate that the kind of abilities or physical capital that renders high scores on many tests is integral to traditional sports. Rhythm and dance, for example, are never or seldom assessed, neither movements in a broader perspective. The construction of ability in the tests seems to be related to Bernstein’s hierarchical model of pedagogy, performance codes, rather than to competence codes which relates to a more holistic perspective on human movement. The study gives a picture about what kind of movements and abilities that is valued in movement assessment. It raises question about which child benefits from the testing and which child does not. How will the testing influence children’s desire to move or their interest for physical activity in a broader perspective?

    References

    Burton, A. W., & Miller, D. E. (1998). Movement Skill Assessment. Champaign. IL: Human Kinetics.

    Bernstein, B. (1990). The Structuring of Pedagogic Discourse. London: Routledge.

    Bourdieu, P. (1988). Program for Sociology of Sport. Sociology of Sport Journal.5, 153-161.

    Evans, J. (2004). Making a difference? Education and ‘ability’ in physical education. European Physical Education Review, 10, 95-108.

    Evans, J., & Penney, D. (2008). Levels on the playing field: The social construction of physical ‘ability’ in physical education curriculum. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 13(1), 31-47.

    Hay, P.J., & Macdonald, D. (2013). Evidence for the social construction of ability in physical education. Sport Education and Society, 15(1), 1-18.

    Wright, J. & Burrows, L. (2006). Re-conceiving ability in physical education: a social analysis. Sport Education and Society, 11(3), 275-291.

    Anna Tidén – anna.tiden@gih.se

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