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  • 1.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, The Research Unit for Movement, Health and Environment.
    Hemmingsson, Erik
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Kallings, Lena
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Latent profile analysis patterns of exercise, sitting and fitness in adults - Associations with metabolic risk factors, perceived health, and perceived symptoms.2020In: PLoS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, no 4, article id e0232210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To identify and describe the characteristics of naturally occurring patterns of exercise, sitting in leisure time and at work and cardiorespiratory fitness, and the association of such profiles with metabolic risk factors, perceived health, and perceived symptoms.

    METHODS: 64,970 participants (42% women, 18-75 years) participating in an occupational health service screening in 2014-2018 were included. Exercise and sitting were self-reported. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated using a submaximal cycle test. Latent profile analysis was used to identify profiles. BMI and blood pressure were assessed through physical examination. Perceived back/neck pain, overall stress, global health, and sleeping problems were self-reported.

    RESULTS: Six profiles based on exercise, sitting in leisure time and at work and cardiorespiratory fitness were identified and labelled; Profile 1 "Inactive, low fit and average sitting in leisure, with less sitting at work"; Profile 2 "Inactive, low fit and sedentary"; Profile 3 "Active and average fit, with less sitting at work"; Profile 4 "Active, average fit and sedentary in leisure, with a sedentary work" (the most common profile, 35% of the population); Profile 5 "Active and fit, with a sedentary work"; Profile 6 "Active and fit, with less sitting at work". Some pairwise similarities were found between profiles (1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 and 6), mainly based on similar levels of exercise, leisure time sitting and fitness, which translated into similar dose-response associations with the outcomes. In general, profile 1 and 2 demonstrated most adverse metabolic and perceived health, profile 4 had a more beneficial health than profile 3, as did profile 6 compared to profile 5.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present results implies a large variation in exercise, sitting, and fitness when studying naturally occurring patterns, and emphasize the possibility to target exercise, sitting time, and/or fitness in health enhancing promotion intervention and strategies.

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  • 2.
    Ivarsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Weman Josefsson, Karin
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Höglind, Sten
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Associations between physical activity and core affects within and across days: a daily diary study.2020In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The objective of the present study was to investigate (a) if daily physical activity at the within-person level is related to four different core affects the same evening, (b) if core affects in the evening predict physical activity the following day, and (c) if physical activity predicts core affects the following day.

    Design: A total of 166 university students were asked to complete the affect and physical activity measures once a day (in the evening), for seven days. Bivariate unconditional latent curve model analyses with structured residuals were performed to investigate the relations within days and across days between the core affects and physical activity.

    Main outcome measures: Core affects and physical activity.

    Results: Physical activity had positive within-day associations with pleasant-activated and pleasant-deactivated core affects and a negative within-day association with unpleasant-deactivated affective responses. There were, however, no statistically significant relations between core affects and physical activity across days.

    Conclusion: These results highlight that the measurement interval might be an important factor that influences the association between core affects and physical activity behaviors.

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  • 3.
    Gerber, Markus
    et al.
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Börjesson, Mats
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jonsdottir, Ingibjörg H
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Association of change in physical activity associated with change in sleep complaints: results from a six-year longitudinal study with Swedish health care workers.2020In: Sleep Medicine, ISSN 1389-9457, E-ISSN 1878-5506, Vol. 69, p. 189-197, article id S1389-9457(18)30304-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To increase our understanding of patterns of change in physical activity and sleep complaints and to test whether intra-individual changes in physical activity are correlated with intra-individual changes in sleep complaints across four measurement time-points over six years, adopting both a between-person and within-person perspective.

    METHODS: Data from a longitudinal cohort study were used in this research. At baseline, 3187 participants took part in the study (86% women, Mage = 46.9 years). The response rate was 84% (n = 3136) after two years, 60% (n = 2232) after four years, and 40% (n = 1498) after six years. Physical activity was assessed with the [51] widely used 4-level physical activity scale (SGPALS), and sleep complaints with three items from the Karolinska Sleep Questionnaire (KSQ). Patterns and correlations of change between physical activity and sleep complaints were examined with latent growth curve modeling.

    RESULTS: Changes in physical activity were associated with changes in sleep complaints across the six years. More specifically, significant associations occurred between baseline levels, correlated (between-person) change, and coupled (within-person change). These associations indicate that higher physical activity levels are not only cross-sectionally linked with fewer sleep complaints, but that increases in physical activity over time (either in comparison to others or to oneself) are paralleled by decreases in sleep complaints.

    CONCLUSIONS: Given that changes in physical activity and sleep are correlated, our findings indicate that it is worthwhile to initiate more physically active lifestyles in physically inactive individuals; and to ensure that those who are already physically active maintain their physical activity levels over longer periods.

  • 4.
    Henning, Georg
    et al.
    German Centre of Gerontology, Berlin, Germany..
    Stenling, Andreas
    University of Umeå, Umeå, Sweden..
    Bielak, Allison A M
    Colorado State University, Fort Collins, USA.
    Bjälkebring, Pär
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Gow, Alan J
    Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, UK.
    Kivi, Marie
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Muniz-Terrera, Graciela
    University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK.
    Johansson, Boo
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Towards an active and happy retirement? Changes in leisure activity and depressive symptoms during the retirement transition.2020In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Retirement is a major life transition in the second half of life, and it can be associated with changes in leisure activity engagement. Although theories of retirement adjustment have emphasized the need to find meaningful activities in retirement, little is known about the nature of changes in leisure activity during the retirement transition and their association with mental health.

    Methods: Based on four annual waves of the 'Health, Aging and Retirement Transitions in Sweden' study, we investigated the longitudinal association of leisure activity engagement and depressive symptoms using bivariate dual change score models. We distinguished intellectual, social, and physical activity engagement.

    Results: We found increases in all three domains of activity engagement after retirement. Although level and change of activity and depressive symptoms were negatively associated, the coupling parameters were not significant, thus the direction of effects remains unclear.

    Conclusion: The results highlight the need to consider the role of lifestyle changes for retirement adjustment and mental health.

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