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  • 1.
    Edwards, John
    et al.
    ICF Paracanoe Committee, Canada.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Rosén, Johanna S
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Tarassova, Olga
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Paracanoe2019In: Canoeing / [ed] Don McKenzie, Bo Berglund, Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell, 2019, p. 106-115Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Rosén, Johanna S
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Arndt, Anton
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control. Karolinska institutet.
    Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Mason, Barry S
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Hutchinson, Michael J
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Tarassova, Olga
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    The impact of impairment on kinematic and kinetic variables in Va'a paddling: Towards a sport-specific evidence-based classification system for Para Va'a.2019In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 37, no 17, p. 1942-1950Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Para Va'a is a new Paralympic sport in which athletes with trunk and/or leg impairment compete over 200 m. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of impairment on kinematic and kinetic variables during Va'a ergometer paddling. Ten able-bodied and 44 Para Va'a athletes with impairments affecting: trunk and legs (TL), legs bilaterally (BL) or leg unilaterally (UL) participated. Differences in stroke frequency, mean paddling force, and joint angles and correlation of the joint angles with paddling force were examined. Able-bodied demonstrated significantly greater paddling force as well as knee and ankle flexion ranges of movement (ROM) on the top hand paddling side compared to TL, BL and UL. Able-bodied, BL and UL demonstrated greater paddling force and trunk flexion compared to TL, and UL demonstrated larger bottom hand paddling side knee and ankle flexion ROM compared to BL. Significant positive correlations were observed for both male and female athletes between paddling force and all trunk flexion angles and ROM in the trunk and pelvis rotation and bottom hand paddling side hip, knee and ankle flexion. The results of this study are important for creating an evidence-based classification system for Para Va'a.

  • 3.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Rosén, Johanna S
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Tarassova, Olga
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Arndt, Anton
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Three-Dimensional Kinematics and Power Output in Elite Para-Kayakers and Elite Able-Bodied Flat-Water Kayakers.2019In: Journal of Applied Biomechanics, ISSN 1065-8483, E-ISSN 1543-2688, p. 93-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Trunk, pelvis and leg movement are important for performance in sprint kayaking. Para-kayaking is a new Paralympic sport in which athletes with trunk and/or leg impairment compete in three classification groups. The purpose of this study was to identify how physical impairments impact on performance by examining: differences in three-dimensional joint range of motion (RoM) between 10 (4 females, 6 males) elite able-bodied kayakers and 41 (13 females, 28 males) elite para-kayakersfrom the three classification groups, and which joint angles were correlated with power output during high intensity kayak ergometer paddling. There were significant differences in RoM between the able-bodied kayakers and the three para-kayak groups for the shoulders (flexion, rotation: able-bodied kayakers<para-kayakers), trunk and pelvis (rotation: able-bodied kayakers>para-kayakers) and legs (hip, knee, ankle flexion: able-bodied kayakers>para-kayakers) during paddling. Furthermore, athletes with greater impairment exhibited lower trunk and leg RoM compared to those with less impairment. Significant positive correlations were observed for both males and females between power output and peak shoulder and trunk flexion, trunk and pelvis rotation RoM and hip, knee and ankle flexion RoM. This information is important for understanding how key kinematic and kinetic variables for para-kayaking performance vary between athletes from different classification groups.

  • 4.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control. Karolinska institutet.
    Tarassova, Olga
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Rosén, Johanna S
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Zakaria, Pascal
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Arndt, Anton
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control. Karolinska institutet.
    Three-dimensional kinematic analysis and power output of elite flat-water kayakers.2018In: Sports Biomechanics, ISSN 1476-3141, E-ISSN 1752-6116, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 414-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose was to examine power output and three-dimensional (3D) kinematic variables in the upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk in elite flat-water kayakers during kayak ergometer paddling. An additional purpose was to analyse possible changes in kinematics with increased intensity and differences between body sides. Six male and four female international level flat-water kayakers participated. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected during three tasks; low (IntL), high (IntH) and maximal (IntM) intensities. No differences were observed in any joint angles between body sides, except for shoulder abduction. Significantly greater range of motion (RoM) values were observed for IntH compared to IntL and for IntM compared to IntL in trunk and pelvis rotation, and in hip, knee and ankle flexion. The mean maximal power output was 610 ± 65 and 359 ± 33 W for the male and female athletes, respectively. The stroke frequencies were significantly different between all intensities (IntL 59.3 ± 6.3; IntH 108.0 ± 6.8; IntM 141.7 ± 18.4 strokes/min). The results showed that after a certain intensity level, the power output must be increased by other factors than increasing the joint angular RoM. This information may assist coaches and athletes to understand the relationship between the movement of the kayaker and the paddling power output.

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