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  • 1.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Andreasson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Sweden.
    Sport and Masculinities in Sweden: Performance and the Notion of Gender Equality2020In: The Palgrave Handbook of Masculinity and Sport / [ed] Rory Magrath, Jamie Cleland, Eric Anderson, Palgrave Macmillan, 2020, p. 465-481Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the chapter is to describe and analyse how the ‘doing’ of masculinity has been performed in Sweden over time, and within two cultural contexts—that of organized (mainly competitive) sport, and physical education in school. Situated within the development of the Swedish welfare state, the research shows that the concept and idea of gender equality is largely a hegemonic sociocultural ideal. At the political and sociocultural level, there is an ongoing movement towards gender-neutral ways of constructing and understanding bodies as well as sport and physical education in Sweden. At the same time the research shows that on an interrelational level, this picture is less clear, as physical education teachers, athletes, coaches and others seemingly tend to talk about gender equality as an ideal, but sometimes fail to practise this in day-to-day living. Nevertheless, embedded in and part of social life at large, the chapter argues that relational patterns are, and will hopefully continue to be, greatly influenced by and part of the Swedish welfare system, which by necessity influences men’s choices in contemporary Sweden concerning how to ‘do’ masculinity and physical activity in relation to more gender inclusive configurations.

  • 2.
    Pringle, Richard
    et al.
    Monash University, Australia.
    Larsson, HåkanSwedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.Gerdin, GöranLinnaeus University.
    Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to Make a Difference2019Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Within the overlapping fields of the sociology of sport, physical education and health education, the use of critical theories and the critical research paradigm has grown in scope. Yet what social impact has this research had?

    This book considers the capacity of critical research and associated social theory to play an active role in challenging social injustices or at least in ‘making a difference’ within health and physical education (HPE) and sporting contexts. It also examines how the use of different social theories impacts sport policies, national curricula and health promotion activities, as well as the practices of HPE teaching and sport training and competition.

    Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education is a valuable resource for academics and students working in the fields of research methods, sociology of sport, physical education and health.

    (Text from publisher)

  • 3.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    et al.
    Dalarna University.
    Backman, Erik
    Dalarna University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Exploring the meaning of movement capability in physical education teacher education through student voices2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars argue that movement content knowledge in physical education teacher education (PETE) needs to be revisited and problematised. In this paper we develop the concept of movement capability representing a widened view of movement content knowledge. If teacher educators want to teach movement capability as an intrinsic educational goal in PETE there is an apparent need to consider what to teach, how it is taught and also how movement capability is understood by the learners. The aim of this paper is to analyse how PETE students experience the meaning of movement capability through the teaching in aquatics, dance and ice-skating. This study takes its departure from a number of previous empirical studies investigating the meaning of movement capability. Interviews with seven PETE students, divided into two focus groups, were conducted on three occasions. A phenomenographic analysis shows four qualitatively different ways of experiencing the meaning of movement capability. Major differences that can be seen when comparing the results of a previous study on physical education teachers and students in PETE are the aspect of subjective experiences and the aspect of the observer. In the main, the students do not seem to take into account an observer?s point of view to the same extent as the group of teachers. The results will hopefully contribute to a deeper and more complex understanding of what can be seen as movement capability in PETE and physical education, and thereby enhance development of the teaching and learning of this capability.

  • 4.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Gender in physical education: A case for performative pedagogy?2019In: Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to Make a Difference / [ed] Richard Pringle, Håkan Larsson, Göran Gerdin, Routledge, 2019, p. 160-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Pringle, Richard
    et al.
    Monash University, Australia.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University.
    Introduction: Are we making a difference?2019In: Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to Make a Difference / [ed] Richard Pringle, Håkan Larsson, Göran Gerdin, Routledge, 2019, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Larsson, Bengt
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Logics of practice in movement culture: a fifty-year follow-up study2019In: AISEP International Conference 2019 Book of abstracts, 2019, p. 464-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Dalarna university.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna university.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Moving beyond rigid orthodoxies in the teaching and assessment of movement in Swedish physical education teacher education: A student perspective2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss physical education teacher education (PETE) students? conceptions of teaching and assessment of movement capability as a part of content knowledge in aquatics, dance and ice-skating at a university in Sweden. The theoretical perspective involves Shulman?s concept of content knowledge, the further elaboration of content knowledge into common content knowledge, and the theoretical perspective underpinning movement capability. The sample consists of two groups with a total of seven PETE students who volunteered to take part in group interviews. Semi-structured interviews with the two groups were conducted on three occasions. Findings display that the students? conceptions of movement capability seem to be focused around performance of movements. Further, the participants felt the messages to be unclear in terms of what they are to know regarding movement capability before entering PETE. There was also a contradiction in that the PETE students felt it to be obvious that they would ?know? certain movements, and at the same time they requested clear and distinct criteria when it came to the performance of movements. This study shows that expectations in terms of PETE students? levels of movement content knowledge need to be further investigated and discussed. This study also highlights the importance of conceptualising what PETE students need to learn if they are to see the need to develop their movement capability on their own. Assessments of students? reflections on what it means to master movements are discussed as an alternative to assessment of performance of movements.

  • 8.
    Thedin Jakobsson, Britta
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Organised physical activity during the school day: a review study2019In: AISEP International Conference 2019 Book of abstracts, 2019, p. 501-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Redelius, Karin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Larsson, Lena
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Physical education teacher education in Sweden2019In: European physical education teacher education practices: initial, induction, and professional development / [ed] Ann MacPhail, Deborah Tannehill, Zuleyha Avsar, Meyer & Meyer Sport, 2019, p. 379-396Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Roe, Daniel
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Hugo, Martin
    Jönköping University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    'Rings on the water': examining the pedagogical approach at a football program for detained youth in Sweden.2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 919-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies indicate that sport within youth institutional settings can be beneficial (e.g. learning social skills) or problematic (e.g. social exclusion) depending on how they are structured, delivered and, ultimately, experienced by students. In this article, we examine the experiences of students and staff in an educational sport program at a Swedish all-male youth detention home (ages 16–20) in order to increase understanding of the pedagogical approach of a sports-based program for detained youth. Drawing on interviews with both students and staff, we identify and elaborate four aspects of the program—building a pedagogical platform, 'seeing' and meeting students, creating a supportive environment, and thinking beyond the institution—that were collectively represented to initiate and guide a process of growth and change for students. We discuss how these aspects of the program's pedagogical approach, in contrast to deficiency-based approaches, can provide a useful framework for delivering sport in ways that can benefit detained youth and other young people in socially vulnerable situations. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR

  • 11.
    MacPhail, Ann
    et al.
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Fletcher, Tim
    Brock University, Canada.
    The Research and Development Challenge: Organizing and Mobilizing Researchers in Response to, and Anticipation of, Teachers’ Needs, Priorities, and Demands.2019In: AISEP International Conference 2019 Book of abstracts, 2019, p. 163-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Joy, Phillip
    et al.
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Canada.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Unspoken: exploring the constitution of masculinities in Swedish physical education classes through body movements.2019In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 491-505Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Masculinities are fluid and socially constructed. Physical education is one means by which masculinities are constituted. Some masculinities may be limited through content, activities, and pedagogy of physical education that shape the way students come to know gender. The purpose of this study was to explore how movements contribute to the discursive construction of masculinities in secondary school physical education; specifically, how body movements constitute masculinities. Methodology: This study uses a poststructural theoretical framework to explore how masculinities are constituted through body movements. The methodology is also informed by knowledge production from bodily practices known as embodied knowledge. Video recordings of physical education classes from eight Swedish secondary schools were observed. The body movements of students were noted and analyzed through discourse analysis. Results: Masculinities were constituted in the moments between formal teaching and activities within the classrooms. Five themes were constructed from the visual observations of students' movements from all lessons including: 1) Movements of energy, 2) Movements of playfulness and bonding, 3) Swaggering movements, 4) Dividing movements, and 5) Regulating movements. These different movements are the ways boys come to know masculinities. Conclusion: This study highlights how embodied knowledge and movements of boys constitute masculinities. It is recommended that pedagogical practices that examine, challenge, and disrupt limiting gender performativity are developed in physical education teaching. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR

  • 13.
    Pringle, Richard
    et al.
    Monash University, Australia.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Gerdin, Göran
    Linnaeus University.
    "What do we want? When do we want it? Now!": Some concluding observations2019In: Critical Research in Sport, Health and Physical Education: How to Make a Difference / [ed] Richard Pringle, Håkan Larsson, Göran Gerdin, Routledge, 2019, p. 241-251Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Att motverka traditionella könsmönster: gästkrönika2018In: Idrott & hälsa, ISSN 1656-1124, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 15.
    Barker, D. M.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Aggerholm, K.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Standal, O.
    nland Norway University College of Applied Science, Elverum, Norway; Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Developing the practising model in physical education: an expository outline focusing on movement capability.2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 209-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical educators currently have a number of pedagogical (or curricular) models at their disposal. While existing models have been well-received in educational contexts, these models seek to extend students’ capacities within a limited number of ‘human activities’ (Arendt, 1958). The activity of human practising, which is concerned with the improvement of the self, is not explicitly dealt with by current models.

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to outline how a model of human practising related to movement capability could be enacted in physical education.

    Findings: Building on a theoretical exposition of human practising presented in a separate paper, this paper provides a practically oriented discussion related to: (1) the general learning outcomes as well as teaching and learning strategies of the model; (2) an outline of five activities that describe how the model could be implemented; and (3) the non-negotiable features of the model.

    Discussion: The model’s potential contribution to the ongoing revitalization of PE as an institutionalized educational practice is discussed. Points concerning how the model relates to wider physical cultures, its position regarding transfer of learning, standards of excellence, and social and cultural transmission are considered.

    Conclusion: The paper is concluded with some reflections on pedagogical models generally and how they relate to the pedagogical model of practising movement capability presented in this paper.

  • 16.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Hur står det till med jämställdheten inom idrotten?2018In: Idrottsforskning.se, ISSN 2002-3944, article id 21 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Idrottens könsmönster: “bara är så” eller “går att påverka”2018In: Resurser, representation och “riktig” idrott: om jämställdhet inom idrotten / [ed] Christine Dartsch, Johan R Norberg & Johan Faskunger, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2018, p. 57-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idrottsvärlden genomsyras av könsmönster. En del idrotter lockar flickor och pojkar, kvinnor och män i lika hög utsträckning, men många lockar i stor utsträckning bara ett av könen. Hur kan vi förstå dessa mönster? Vad innebär de för deltagarna? Går de att förändra? Hur?

  • 18.
    Casey, Ashley
    et al.
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    “It’s Groundhog Day”: Foucault’s Governmentality and Crisis Discourses in Physical Education2018In: Quest (National Association for Physical Education in Higher Education), ISSN 0033-6297, E-ISSN 1543-2750, Vol. 70, no 4, p. 438-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dominant discourses in physical education research center on subject-wide crisis. This is despite repeated calls to address enduring concerns about how physical education is taught. In short, the subject seems caught in Groundhog Day (defined by Oxford Dictionaries (n.d.) as "a situation in which a series of unwelcome or tedious events appear to be recurring in exactly the same way"). This article scrutinizes this position through Foucault's lens of governmentality, which focuses particularly on power/knowledge relations and their relationship to subjectivity. Through this lens, research functions as a shaper of contemporary understanding and becomes a means for intervention by "experts." The article is structured as a conversation between authors about dominant discourses in physical education research and issues of governmentality. It argues that research approaches such as action research are framed within other power/knowledge relations and may provide a way to wake up on a new day.

  • 19.
    Engström, Lars-Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Logics of practice in movement culture: Lars-Magnus Engström’s contribution to understanding participation in movement cultures2018In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, p. 892-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present a framework for exploring participation in and social stratification of movement culture based on Pierre Bourdieu?s concept logic of practice. The background to our approach is Lars-Magnus Engström?s struggle to understand the impact of social stratification on participation in movement culture in a now nearly fifty-year follow-up study. The aim of the article is to elaborate further a framework, which Engström drafted in one of his last publications. Here, we assume that participation in movement cultures is guided by a number of logics of practice that are historically, culturally and socially constituted, and which relate to people?s tastes in particular ways that lead to social stratification. These logics are grouped into three overarching kinds of practices: performing, improving and experiencing, which engender both practice and social stratification. Further, the different logics of practice are linked to a principle of uncertainty, which means that quantitative empirical data must be interpreted rather than measured in a strict sense. The here outlined framework suggests that future research about participation in movement culture needs to take into account information about the structure, rhythm and tempo of the practice, as well as of the directionality of the actions. Information about these issues can hopefully contribute to a more elaborated understanding of the impact of social stratification on participation in movement culture, and in what forms movements are pursued.

  • 20.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Med reflektion och samtal: en lyckad lektion2018In: Idrott & hälsa, ISSN 1653-1124, no 2, p. 26-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Aggerholm, K.
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Standal, O.
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Barker, D. M.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    On practising in physical education: outline for a pedagogical model.2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 197-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Models-based approaches to physical education have in recent years developed as a way for teachers and students to concentrate on a manageable number of learning objectives, and align pedagogical approaches with learning subject matter and context. This paper draws on Hannah Arendt’s account ofvita activato map existing approaches to physical education as oriented towards: (a) health and exercise, (b) sport and games, and (c) experience and exploration.

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to outline a new pedagogical model for physical education:a practising model. We argue that the form of human activity related to practising is not well represented in existing orientations and models. To sustain this argument, we highlight the most central aspects of practising, and at the same time describe central features of the model.

    Relevance and implications: The paper addresses pedagogical implications the practising model has for physical education teachers. Central learning outcomes and teaching strategies related to four essential and ‘non-negotiable’ features of the practising model are discussed. These strategies are: (1) acknowledging subjectivity and providing meaningful challenges, (2) focusing on content and the aims of practising, (3) specifying and negotiating standards of excellence and (4) providing adequate time to practising.

    Conclusion: The practising model has the potential to inform new perspectives on pedagogical approaches, and renew and improve working methods and learning practices, in physical education. 

  • 22.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Physical education - educating bodies after postmodernism?2018In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, ISSN 0013-1857, E-ISSN 1469-5812, Vol. 50, no 14, p. 1435-1436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article offers the author's perspective about what comes after postmodernism and how it affects educational philosophy and theory, focusing on physical education (PE) in schools. The author argues that the adoption of the idea of performative pedagogies as a way to elicit social change also indicates adoption of movement. Education insights about bodies and embodiment from the case of Indian sprinter Dutee Chand are noted.

  • 23.
    Karlefors, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Searching for the ‘How’: Teaching methods in Swedish physical education2018In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, focus in educational research – as well as in policy – seems to have shifted from teaching to learning. As a result of this, we know little about what different teaching methods are used in the subject, and how. The purpose of this article is to explore how different teaching methods are used in Swedish secondary physical education. Video recorded physical education lessons in eight Swedish secondary schools were used to identify different teaching methods. Kirk’s (1996) elaboration of the Spectrum of teaching styles formed the basis of the analysis. In subsequent interviews, teachers (8) and students (24) were asked questions about teaching and learning in the subject. All of the five methods that Kirk (1996) outlined were identified in the lessons, but they were very unevenly used. The task-based method was the most frequent one, while the guided discovery method was hardly used at all. The impression was that the teachers did not seriously consider the selection of methods in relation to objective, content and group of students. The students, for their part, described a situation where they were often left to their own devices regarding what they were supposed to learn. Based on the analysis, we argue that teachers need guidance to improve and develop their deliberate use of teaching methods in general, and especially student-centred methods. This is necessary if the goals of the subject are to be achievable for all students. We conclude that the marginal focus on teaching methods in physical education is not related to a parallel increase of the interest in student learning in the subject. On the contrary, the low interest in the use of different teaching methods seems rather to be related to a low interest in what students are to learn in the subject.

  • 24.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    The productive effect of power: (dis)pleasurable bodies materialising in and through the discursive practices of boys’ physical education.2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 66-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pleasure is often a key feature of school physical education (PE) and, indeed, a lot of students find pleasure in and through PE while others do not. However, pleasure is rarely considered to be of educational value in the subject [Pringle, R. (2010). “Finding Pleasure in Physical Education: A Critical Examination of the Educative Value of Positive Movement Affects.”Quest62: 119–134]. Further, since pleasure is linked to power [Foucault, M. (1980).Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972–1977. New York: Pantheon; Gerdin, G., and R. Pringle. (2015). “The Politics of Pleasure: An Ethnographic Examination Exploring the Dominance of the Multi-Activity Sport-Based Physical Education Model.”Sport, Education and Society. doi:10.1080/13573322.2015.1019448] it is in fact not entirely straightforward to legitimise the educational value of PE in relation to pleasure.

    Purpose: In this paper, we explore how a group of boys derive pleasures from their involvement in PE, but also how these power-induced pleasures are integral to gender normalisation processes. The findings presented are particularly discussed in terms of inclusive/exclusive pedagogical practices related to gender, bodies and pleasures.

    Research setting and participants: The research setting was a single-sex, boys’ secondary school in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants in this study were 60 Year 10 (age 14–15) students from two PE classes.

    Data collection and analysis: Using a visual ethnographic approach [Pink, S. (2007).Doing Visual Ethnography. London: Sage] involving observations and video recordings of boys participating in PE, the boys’ representations and interpretations of the visual data were explored during both focus groups and individual interviews. The data were analysed using (a visually oriented) discourse analysis [Foucault, M. (1998). “Foucault.” InMichel Foucault. Aesthetics, Method and Epistemology, edited by J. D. Faubion, 459–463. New York: The New Press; Rose, G. (2007).Visual Methodologies: An Introduction to the Interpretation of Visual Materials. London: Sage].

    Findings: By elucidating the discursive practices of PE in this setting and employing (Butler, J. (1993).Bodies that Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’. New York: Routledge] concept of ‘materialisation’, we suggest that boy’s bodies materialise as productive and pleasurable or displeasurable bodies through submitting/subjecting to certain bodily regimes, developing embodied mastery when it comes to certain sports, and displaying bodies in particular ways. The analysis indicate that the discursive practices of PE contribute to boys’ bodies materialising as pleasurable or displeasurable and the (re)production of gender in the subject as shaped by discourse and the productive effect of power.

    Discussion and conclusions: In line with [Gard, M. (2008). “When a Boy’s Gotta Dance: New Masculinities, Old Pleasures.”Sport, Education and Society13 (2): 181–193], we conclude that the focus on certain discursively constructed bodily practices at the same time continues to restrict the production of a diversity of bodily movement pleasures. Hence, traditional gender patterns are reproduced through a selection of particular sports/physical activities that all the students are expected to participate in. We propose that the ongoing constitution of privileged forms of masculinity, masculine bodies and masculine pleasures as related to fitness, health and sport and (certain) boys’ subsequent exercise of power in PE needs further critical examination. 

  • 25.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Högskolan Dalarna, Idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Assessment of movement in Swedish PETE: A matter of learning or just ticking a box?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general knowledge base of Health and Physical Education Teacher Education (HPETE) is growing stronger. As a part of that knowledge base there is an ongoing discussion of the meaning of HPETE students’ movement capabilities (Brown 2013, Capel et al 2011, Johnson 2013, Siedentop 2009, Tinning 2010). Lee Shulman’s (1987) framework of Content Knowledge (CK) and Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) have been used by scholars to examine how students’ ability to move and their ability to teach are valued in HPETE (Backman & Pearson 2016, Herold & Waring 2016, Ward et al 2015). However, the students’ own voices about these issues have rarely been acknowledged. The aim with this paper is therefore to examine how HPETE students at one university in Sweden experience the assessment of movement knowledge in and about aquatics, dance and ice-skating. Semi-structured interviews with two groups including a total of seven students were performed by the one researcher at three different occasions. The interviewing researcher’s regularly work is not at the same university as the participating students. The interviews focused specifically on the teaching and assessment of aquatics, dance and skating within the first semester of HPETE. The transcription of the six interviews was performed by external assistance and the students were all anonymized in the transcribed material. The following analysis, performed by two researchers stationed at the same university as the participating students, focused on how the transcribed material related to the aim and the concepts of Shulman. Preliminary results show several expressions of that the students in our study were not sure of what kinds or what level of movement knowledge were expected of them as they entered HPETE. Further, several students expressed limited possibilities to develop movement ability merely through HPETE teaching but at the same time, practicing unfamiliar movements outside HPETE teacher-led teaching was rare. Although assessment of movement knowledge were most commonly expressed as a qualitative process, some students mentioned that they occasionally experienced assessment of movement knowledge as “a-tick-in-a-box”. Interestingly, the cognitive aspects of movement knowledge (i.e. describe, observe, analyse, discuss, etc.) were on the one hand expressed as vital, but on the other as less characterized by learning compared to the practice of movement skills. The results will be analysed and discussed in relation to research within the field and in relation to Lee Shulman’s framework of CK and PCK. Although making no claims to generalize the results in this study based on the limited number of participants, they might contribute to the discussion of what forms of knowledge to prioritise in HPETE, and thereby also help develop HPE on a school level.

    References

    Backman, E. & Pearson, P. 2016. “We should assess the students in more authentic situations”. Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers. European Physical Education Review. 22(1): 47-64.

    Brown, T.D. 2013. “A vision lost? (Re)articulating an Arnoldian conception of education ‘in’ movement in physical education.” Sport, Education and Society 18 (1): 21-37.

    Capel, S., Hayes, S., Katene, W. and P. Velija. 2011. “The interaction of factors which influence secondary student physical education teachers’ knowledge and development as teachers.” European Physical Education Review, 17 (2): 183–201.

    Herold, F. and M. Waring. 2016. “Is practical subject matter knowledge still important? Examining the Siedentopian perspective on the role of content knowledge in physical education teacher education.” Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/17408989.2016.1192592

    Johnson, T.G. 2013. “The value of performance in Physical Education teacher education.” Quest 65 (4): 485-497.

    Shulman, L.S. 1987. “Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform.” Harvard Educational Review 57 (1): 1-21.

    Siedentop, D. 2009. “Content Knowledge for Physical Education. In The Routledge Physical Education Reader, edited by R. Bailey and D. Kirk, 243-253. Abingdon: Routledge

    Tinning, R. 2010. Pedagogy and human movement: theory, practice, research. Abingdon: Routledge.

    Ward, P., Kim, I., Ko, B. and W. Li. 2015. “Effects of Improving Teachers’ Content Knowledge on Teaching and Student Learning in Physical Education.” Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport 86 (2): 130–139.

  • 26.
    Göran, Gerdin
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    (Dis)pleasurable boys' bodies materialising in PE2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pleasure is often a key feature of school physical education (PE) and, indeed, a lot of students find pleasure in and through PE while others do not. However, pleasure is rarely considered to be of educational value in the subject. Further, since pleasure is linked to power it is in fact not entirely straightforward to legitimise the educational value of PE in relation to pleasure. In this paper, we will explore how a group of boys derive pleasures from their involvement in PE, but also how these power-induced pleasures are integral to gender normalisation processes. The paper draws on ethnographic data from a single-sex, boys’ secondary school in New Zealand involving 60 Year 10 (age 14-15) students. Using a visual ethnographic approach (Pink, 2007) consisting of observations and video recordings of boys participating in PE, the boys’ representations and interpretations of the visual data were explored during both focus groups and individual interviews. The data was analysed using (a visually oriented) discourse analysis (Foucault, 1980; Rose, 2007). By elucidating the discursive practices of PE in this setting and employing Butler’s (1993) concept of ‘materialisation’, we argue that boy’s bodies materialise as productive and pleasurable or displeasurable bodies through submitting/subjecting to certain bodily regimes, developing embodied mastery when it comes to certain sports, and displaying bodies in particular ways. The analysis indicates that the discursive practices of PE contribute to boys’ bodies materialising as pleasurable or dis-pleasurable and the (re)production of gender in the subject as shaped by discourse and the productive effect of power. We conclude that the focus on certain discursively constructed bodily practices at the same time continues to restrict the production of a diversity of bodily movement pleasures. Hence, traditional gender patterns are reproduced through a selection of particular sports/physical activities that all the students are expected to participate in. We propose that the ongoing constitution of privileged forms of masculinity, masculine bodies and masculine pleasures as related to fitness, health and sport and (certain) boys’ subsequent exercise of power in PE needs further critical examination.

  • 27.
    Linghede, Eva
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Figuring More Livable Elsewheres: Queering Acts, Moments, and Spaces in Sport (Studies)2017In: Journal of Sport and Social Issues, ISSN 0193-7235, E-ISSN 1552-7638, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 290-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by calls for an emphasis on the "potentiality of the present" in feminist and queer (sport) studies, this article explores queering acts, moments, and spaces in stories of athletes living nonstraight. To do this, we use Haraway's and Braidotti's notion of figuration and creative analytical writing. With one foot rooted in what is, our three figurations of the queering athlete take us into and beyond heteronormativity to what can be(come). Two figurations enact how sex segregation and gender norms in sports can serve as conditions of possibilities that open up for other-worlds-in-the-making and the third works sexuality against identity and queers the hetero–homo binary. They are figurations—in form and content—of a "science of the possibility of science."

  • 28.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University.
    ‘It doesn't matter how they move really, as long as they move.’ Physical education teachers on developing their students’ movement capabilities.2017In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 137-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Movement is key in physical education, but the educational value of moving is sometimes obscure. In Sweden, recent school reforms have endeavoured to introduce social constructionist concepts of knowledge and learning into physical education, where the movement capabilities of students are in focus. However, this means introducing a host of new and untested concepts to the physical education teacher community. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to explore how Swedish physical education teachers reason about helping their students develop movement capability. Participants, setting and research design. The data are taken from a research project conducted in eight Swedish secondary schools called ‘Physical education and health – a subject for learning?’ in which students and teachers were interviewed and physical education lessons were video-recorded. This article draws on data from interviews with the eight participating teachers, five men and three women. The teachers were interviewed partly using a stimulated recall technique where the teachers were asked to comment on video clips from physical education lessons where they themselves act as teachers. Data analysis. A discourse analysis was conducted with a particular focus on the ensemble of more or less regulated, deliberate and finalised ways of doing things that characterise the eight teachers’ approach to helping the students develop their movement capabilities. Findings. The interviews indicate that anactivation discourse(‘trying out’ and ‘being active’) dominates the teachers’ ways of reasoning about their task (a focal discourse). When the teachers were specifically asked about how they can help the students improve their movement capacities, asport discourse(a referential discourse) was expressed. This discourse, which is based on the standards of excellence of different sports, conditions what the teachers see as (im)possible to do due to time limitations and a wish not to criticise the students publicly. The mandated holisticsocial constructionist discourseabout knowledge and learning becomes obscure (an intruder discourse) in the sense that the teachers interpret it from the point of view of a dualist discourse, where ‘knowledge’ (theory) and ‘skill’ (practice) are divided. Conclusions. Physical education teachers recoil from the task of developing the students’ movement capabilities due to certain conditions ofimpossibility related to the discursive terrain they are moving in. The teachers see as their primary objective the promotion of physical activity – now and in the future; they conceptualise movement capability in such a way that emphasising the latter would jeopardise their possibilities of realising the primary objective. Should the aim be to reinforce the social constructionist national curriculum, where capability to move is suggested to be an attempt at formulating a concept of knowledge that includes both propositional and procedural aspects and which is not based on the standards of excellence of either sport techniques or motor ability, then teachers will need support to interpret the national curriculum from a social constructionist perspective. Further, alternative standards of excellence as well as a vocabulary for articulating these will have to be developed. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR

  • 29.
    Gibbs, Béatrice
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. School of Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Teaching dance in physical education using exergames2017In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 237-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the different ways in which a dance exergame can be used to teach dance in upper secondary school physical education. Particular attention is paid to the learning processes that students are involved in when the dance game is used as a teaching resource. A socio-cultural perspective on learning constitutes the analytical framework. The study demonstrates three different uses: instructor, facilitator and inspirer. In relation to these uses the students are involved in the following learning processes: learning by imitating, repeating, communicating, negotiating, instructing, modelling and using metaphors. It is argued that dance exergames can be used pedagogically to teach dance because they focus on the moves and steps and allow the teacher to focus on observing, supporting, assigning tasks and providing feedback.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Susanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    ‘This might be him; the guy I’m gonna marry’: Love and sexual relationships between female elite-athletes and male coaches2017In: International Review for the Sociology of Sport, ISSN 1012-6902, E-ISSN 1461-7218, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 819-838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Infatuation, love and sexual relationships exist virtually anywhere. Coach–athlete sexualrelationships (CASR), however, are overlooked and under-researched. Within sport sociology, CASR have been framed predominantly by a sexual abuse discourse. Informed by Foucault’s discourse analysis, this study explores how discourses regarding performance enhancement in elite-sport and coaching, and romantic love, frame female elite-athletes’ experiences with CASR. Interviews with four female elite-athletes aged 26–30 were conducted. The results indicate that CASR are potentially problematic because they intersect and challenge discourses comprising elite-sports, coach–athlete relationships, female sexual agency, and love. Moreover, discourses of power differ between the professional and private contexts. While the athletes expect their coaches to exert dominance and control in the elite-sport context, love relationships are about equally and mutually giving away power and control. Although CASR can facilitate motivation and performance, framing CASR as inherently unequal and abusive can contribute to stigmatisation, secrecy and athlete disempowerment.

  • 31.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Bedömningar av ungas rörelseförmåga – intervju med Anna Tidén2016In: Idrottsforskaren: Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Didaktiska perspektiv på idrott2016In: Idrottsvetenskap: en introduktion / [ed] Susanna Hedenborg, Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 89-112Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik: praktiknära idrottsdidaktik2016In: Hur är det i praktiken?: Lärare utforskar ämnet idrott och hälsa / [ed] Håkan Larsson, Suzanne Lundvall, Jane Meckbach, Tomas Peterson & Mikale Quennerstedt, Stockholm: Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH , 2016, p. 5-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad ska elever lära sig i idrott och hälsa? Hur lägger man upp undervisning som stödjer alla elever i deras lärande? Hur kan lärare göra likvärdiga bedömningar av elevers kunskaper? Detta är några av de frågor som behandlas i boken du nu håller i. Boken sammanfattar den forskning som genomförts inom Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik (FIHD). FIHD startade år 2011 som ett led i den statliga satsningen Lärarlyftet, där särskilda medel avsattes för genomförandet av forskarskolor för lärare och förskollärare. Deltagarna i FIHD är alla verksamma lärare i idrott och hälsa. Detta har en central betydelse i sammanhanget. Skolämnet idrott och hälsa har funnits länge i den svenska skolan, men den vetenskapliga förankringen och utforskningen av ämnet har varit svag. Den forskning som existerat har inte i första hand genomförts av, eller på initiativ av, lärare i ämnet. Initiativen har istället kommit från annat håll, ofta från olika myndigheter. Forskningsresultaten har speglat myndigheternas intressen snarare än lärarnas. Därför är det ett stort nöje att i denna bok få möjlighet att presentera forskningsresultat som bygger på lärares frågor och där lärare har varit forskare. I detta inledande kapitel presenterar FIHD:s styrgrupp, bestående av medarbetare vid Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Malmö högskola och Örebro universitet, bakgrunden till FIHD, den forskning som fanns till hands då lärarna påbörjade sina forskningsprojekt samt de ambitioner som varit förknippade med forskarskolan.

  • 34.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Forskning om undervisning och lärande i skolämnet idrott och hälsa2016In: Idrottsforskaren: Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, no 1, p. 5-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, SuzanneSwedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.Meckbach, JaneSwedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.Peterson, TomasMalmö högskola.Quennerstedt, MikaelÖrebro universitet.
    Hur är det i praktiken?: Lärare utforskar ämnet idrott och hälsa2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad ska elever lära sig i idrott och hälsa? Hur lägger man upp undervisning som stödjer alla elever i deras lärande? Hur kan lärare göra likvärdiga bedömningar av elevers kunskaper? Detta är några av de frågor som behandlas i denna bok. Boken sammanfattar den forskning som genomförts inom Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik (FIHD). FIHD startade år 2011 som ett led i den statliga satsningen Lärarlyftet, där särskilda medel avsattes för genomförandet av forskarskolor för lärare och förskollärare. Deltagarna i FIHD är alla verksamma lärare i idrott och hälsa. I denna bok presenterar de översiktligt resultat och slutsatser från sina olika forskningsprojekt. Kapitlen behandlar aktuella teman som lärande, hälsa, etnicitet och genus samt betyg och bedömning i idrott och hälsa.

    Boken finns fritt tillgänglig på webben.

    Innehåll:

    • Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik: praktiknära idrottsdidaktik
    • Träffar vi alltid rätt? Elevers lärande i idrott och hälsa / Andreas Jacobsson
    • Elevers förståelse av hälsa i idrott och hälsa / Annika Ahlberg
    • Är grönsaker alltid hälsosamt? / Magnus Brolin
    • Hitta lätt – så blir det rätt! / Kerstin Nilsson
    • Dansspel som läromedel / Béatrice Gibbs
    • Dokumentation i idrott och hälsa – en omöjlig ekvation? / Rickard Håkanson
    • Passar jag in? Nyanlända ungas möte med idrott och hälsa / Åke Huitfeldt
    • Att göra tudelning – idrott och hälsa i åk 1 ur ett genusperspektiv / Inga Oliynyk
    • Bedömning för lärande (BFL) i ämnet idrott och hälsa / Björn Tolgfors
    • Vad är ”kroppslig förmåga”? Om behovet av ett yrkesspråk i idrott och hälsa / Jenny Kroon
    • Betygsättning – ett (o)möjligt uppdrag? / Izabela Seger
  • 36.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Idrott och hälsa: i går, i dag, i morgon2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I Idrott och hälsa – i går, i dag, i morgon belyser författaren utifrån aktuellt forsknings- och utvecklingsarbete bakgrunden till varför kunskap och rörelse ofta antas stå i motsats till varandra, vilket inte alls behöver vara fallet. Författaren betonar att det behövs idrott och hälsa som vänder sig till alla elever, även de som har negativa erfarenheter av att röra sig. För att kunna organisera och leda sådan undervisning krävs lärare som själva förstår, kan delta i och förändra rörelsekulturer.Boken behandlar frågor som: Vad är kunskap i idrott och hälsa? Vad innebär det att undervisa för lärande i idrott och hälsa i en målstyrd skola? Hur kan idrott och hälsa utvecklas för att möta kritiken om bristande jämställdhet och mångfald samt svårigheter att integrera elever med funktionsnedsättning?Idrott och hälsa – i går, i dag, i morgon riktar sig främst till blivande och yrkesverksamma lärare inom ämnet idrott och hälsa. Boken kan fungera som diskussionsunderlag för utveckling av undervisning och som läromedel i fortbildning av lärare och vid handledarutbildningar.

    (Förlagets text)

  • 37. Gleddie, Doug
    et al.
    Feith, Joey
    Howe, P. David
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Cale, Lorraine
    Casey, Ashley
    Joey: social media as a tool for professional development2016In: Digital technologies and learning in physical education: pedagogical cases / [ed] Ashley Casey, Victoria A. Goodyear, Kathleen M. Armour, Routledge, 2016, p. 121-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Pedagogiska perspektiv på idrott2016In: Idrottsvetenskap: en introduktion / [ed] Susanna Hedenborg, Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 67-88Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Linghede, Eva
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    (Re)presenting equestrian histories—storytelling as a method of inquiry.2016In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 82-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responding to calls about the need to ‘give voice’ to groups previously marginalized in research and to challenge meta-narratives about men in sports this paper explores the use of a narrative approach to illuminate men's experiences—and the doing of gender—within equestrian sports, a sport dominated by women in Sweden. Adopting the position of a storyteller three literary short-stories were constructed from interviews with men active in equestrianism. (Re)presenting research findings in this way evoke a lot of questions in academic circles. We have often been askedhowthe stories were constructed and how one judges whether they are representative and trustworthy. These are legitimate questions, no doubt. But questions that are of importance to all qualitative research. It is as if the writing of stories is some kind of mysterious abracadabra activity and not a deliberate and theoretically informed creative process. While reading critique of narrative ways to (re)present research findings, where some researchers suggest that narrative inquiry is a retreat from the difficult academic work of generating new and important ideas, our assumption is that it stems from this misunderstanding about story writing. And maybe the construction of stories has not been given enough attention in narrative research. The purpose of this article is therefore to illustrate the difficult but inspiring activity of transforming 19 interviews into literary short-stories and to highlight methodological concerns relating to presenting these stories. We also demonstrate that creative analytical writing is not just a way of presenting research findings but also a method of inquiry. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]

  • 40.
    Nyberg, Gun
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Rörelseförmåga i idrott och hälsa: en bok om rörelse, kunskap och lärande2016Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I ämnet idrott och hälsa ska eleverna få möjlighet att utveckla sin rörelse­förmåga. Men vad är rörelseförmåga egentligen? Innebär det att vara framgångsrik i bollspel, att kunna springa fort eller att behärska en satstagning för en rotation i luften? 

    Genom att ge en bild av vad rörelseförmåga kan vara, hur rörelse­förmåga kan utvecklas och vad det kan betyda för elever att röra sig på olika sätt i olika sammanhang, bidrar Rörelseförmåga i idrott och hälsa med tankar och idéer om hur undervisning i ämnet kan utformas.

    Boken handlar också om hur vi kan utmana normer som påverkar elevers lärande, undervisningens innehåll samt våra föreställningar om vad som räknas som ”bra i idrott”. Författarna hoppas att boken ska kunna bidra till ett perspektivskifte som utmanar de (ofta outtalade och förgivettagna) kvalitetskrav som etablerade och formaliserade idrotter bär med sig till undervisningen i idrott och hälsa.

    Boken vänder sig främst till studerande som ska bli lärare i idrott och hälsa samt verksamma lärare, men också till andra som har intresse av undervisning i rörelse och rörelseförmåga.

    (Text från förlaget)

  • 41.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Undervisning för lärande i idrott och hälsa – hur kan det se ut?2016In: Idrottsforskaren: Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, no 1, p. 74-84Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    What should a Physical Education teacher know?: An analysis of learning outcomes for future Physical Education teachers in Sweden.2016In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 185-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research indicates that Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) has only limited impact on how physical education (PE) is taught in schools. This paper offers possible explanations for the difficulties of influencing subject traditions in PE through analysing PETE curriculum documents. The purpose is show how knowledge is expressed through learning outcomes in local curriculum documents at six PETE institutions in Sweden. Inspired by Fenstermacher’s ideas about teacher knowledge, our ambition is to discuss the potential educational consequences of the epistemological assumptions underlying specific learning outcomes. From the total number of 224 learning outcomes described in the curriculum documents, different types of knowledge were identified and clustered together into the following themes: Teaching PE, Interpreting curriculum documents, Physical movement skills, Science, Social health, Pedagogy, Critical inquiry, and Research methods. In most of the identified themes, learning outcomes are formulated with an integrated perspective on so called performance knowledge and propositional knowledge. However, particularly in the themes Science and Physical movement skills, two very influential themes, the concept of knowledge is limited and unilateral in relation to ideas of different forms of teacher knowledge. Drawing on the work of Tinning, we offer an explanation as to how teacher knowledge in the themes Science and Physical movement skills, emanating from behaviouristic and craft knowledge orientations, is formulated.

  • 43.
    Redelius, Karin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Youth's participation rights in relation to dominant movement cultures2016In: Routledge Handbook of Youth Sport / [ed] Ken Green, Andy Smith, Routledge, 2016, p. 332-339Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Svender, Jenny
    Riksidrottsförbundet.
    Att utveckla idrott med ett genusperspektiv2015In: Idéer för idrottsutveckling / [ed] Josef Fahlén och Staffan Karp, Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker , 2015, p. 77-92Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Learning movement cultures in physical education practice2015In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 565-572Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    The focus of this special issue is how learning occurs in physical education (PE) practice in relation to different movement cultures in various contexts. The basis for the special issue is the Invited Symposium held at the AIESEP World Congress 2014 in Auckland, New Zealand, entitled Physical education – a subject for learning? The symposium revolved around learning in PE and the presenters, in line with a Swedish Didactics of Physical Education research tradition, were inspired by research in didactics and what in a wide sense can be called a sociocultural perspective of learning. In relation to learning, Wertsch (1998 p. 24) states that: ‘The task of a sociocultural approach is to explicate the relationship between human action, on the one hand, and the cultural, institutional and historical contexts in which action occurs on the other’.Researchers from other countries were also involved in the special issue in order to attract and include scholars from a wider research community. The special issue accordingly aims to bring scholars from different countries together in order to explore learning in PE and what is considered as valuable knowledge in different movement cultures.

  • 46.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Karlefors, Inger
    Umeå universitet.
    Physical education cultures in Sweden: fitness, sports, dancing … learning?2015In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 573-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a significant article from 1993, Crum describes the purpose of physical education (PE) as a ‘planned introduction into movement culture’. In broad terms, this purpose is tantamount to the stated purpose of Swedish PE in national steering documents. Crum contends, however, that physical educators do not prioritise learning, which is largely due to the different ‘movement cultures’ that constitute the PE lessons. This article explores how practice unfolds in movement cultures that are included in Swedish PE and their implications for teaching and learning in the subject. Some 30 (indoor) PE lessons in eight secondary schools in four cities throughout Sweden were video recorded. At ‘first glance’ these lessons indicated the prevalence of four logics of practice: a physical training logic, a sports logic, a sport technique logic and a dance logic. However, further analysis revealed that the teachers' and students' actions were not entirely in line with a logic of practice of training the body, winning the game, learning sporting skills or learning to dance. Instead, the PE practice largely unfolded as a ‘looks-like-practice’, where the purpose of teaching was blurred, and where any ‘planned introduction into movement culture’ was difficult to identify. In the final section, the authors discuss how physical activity logics can be recontextualised in a PE setting in order to emphasise the educational contribution of PE.

  • 47.
    Redelius, Karin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Fagrell, Birgitta
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Symbolic capital and the hetero norm as doxa in physical education2015In: Pierre Bourdieu and Physical Culture / [ed] lisahunter, Smith & Emerald, New York: Routledge, 2015, 1, p. 126-133Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Vad innebär det att bli lärare i idrott och hälsa?: Recension av boken Becoming a physical education teacher av Gary Stidder (2015)2015In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, article id 10 decemberArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Aage Radmann. Huliganlandskapet. Medier, våld och maskuliniteter: Recension2014In: Tidskrift för Genusvetenskap, ISSN 1654-5443, E-ISSN 2001-1377, Vol. 35, no 2-3, p. 155-157Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Larssson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Bedömning och betyg i Idrott och hälsa2014Conference paper (Other academic)
123 1 - 50 of 108
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