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  • 1. Dal Maso, Fabien
    et al.
    Raison, Maxime
    Lundberg, Arne
    Arndt, Anton
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC).
    Allard, Paul
    Begon, Mickaël
    Glenohumeral translations during range-of-motion movements, activities of daily living, and sports activities in healthy participants.2015Inngår i: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 30, nr 9, s. 1002-1007Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Glenohumeral translations have been mainly investigated during static poses while shoulder rehabilitation exercises, activities of daily living, and sports activities are dynamic. Our objective was to assess glenohumeral translations during shoulder rehabilitation exercises, activities of daily living, and sports activities to provide a preliminary analysis of glenohumeral arthrokinematics in a broad range of dynamic tasks.

    METHODS: Glenohumeral translations were computed from trajectories of markers fitted to intracortical pins inserted into the scapula and the humerus. Two participants (P1 and P2) performed full range-of-motion movements including maximum arm elevations and internal-external rotations rehabilitation exercises, six activities of daily living, and five sports activities.

    FINDINGS: During range-of-motion movements, maximum upward translation was 7.5mm (P1) and 4.7mm (P2). Upward translation during elevations was smaller with the arm internally (3.6mm (P1) and 2.9mm (P2)) than neutrally (4.2mm (P1) and 3.7mm (P2)) and externally rotated (4.3mm (P1) and 4.3mm (P2)). For activities of daily living and sports activities, only anterior translation during reach axilla for P1 and upward translation during ball throwing for P2 were larger than the translation measured during range-of-motion movements (108% and 114%, respectively).

    INTERPRETATION: While previous electromyography-based studies recommended external rotation during arm elevation to minimize upward translation, measures of glenohumeral translations suggest that internal rotation may be better. Similar amplitude of translation during ROM movement and sports activities suggests that large excursions of the humeral head may be caused not only by fast movements, but also by large amplitude movements.

  • 2. Dal Maso, Fabien
    et al.
    Raison, Maxime
    Lundberg, Arne
    Arndt, Anton
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC).
    Begon, Mickaël
    Coupling between 3D displacements and rotations at the glenohumeral joint during dynamic tasks in healthy participants.2014Inngår i: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 29, nr 9, s. 1048-1055Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Glenohumeral displacements assessment would help to design shoulder prostheses with physiological arthrokinematics and to establish more biofidelic musculoskeletal models. Though displacements were documented during static tasks, there is little information on their 3D coupling with glenohumeral angle during dynamic tasks. Our objective was to characterize the 3D glenohumeral displacement-rotation couplings during dynamic arm elevations and rotations.

    METHODS: Glenohumeral displacements were measured from trajectories of reflective markers fitted on intracortical pins inserted into the scapula and humerus. Bone geometry was recorded using CT-scan. Only four participants were recruited to the experiment due to its invasiveness. Participants performed dynamic arm abduction, flexion and axial rotations. Linear regressions were performed between glenohumeral displacements and rotations. The pin of the scapula of one participant moved, his data were removed from analysis, and results are based on three participants.

    FINDINGS: The measurement error of glenohumeral kinematics was less than 0.15mm and 0.2°. Maximum glenohumeral displacements were measured along the longitudinal direction and reached up to +12.4mm for one participant. Significant couplings were reported especially between longitudinal displacement and rotation in abduction (adjusted R(2) up to 0.94).

    INTERPRETATION: The proposed method provides the potential to investigate glenohumeral kinematics during all kinds of movements. A linear increase of upward displacement during dynamic arm elevation was measured, which contrasts with results based on a series of static poses. The systematic investigation of glenohumeral displacements under dynamic condition may help to provide relevant recommendation for the design of shoulder prosthetic components and musculoskeletal models.

  • 3. Frohm, A
    et al.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC).
    Thorstensson, Alf
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC).
    Patellar tendon load in different types of eccentric squats.2007Inngår i: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 22, nr 6, s. 704-11Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Differences in mechanical loading of the patellar tendon have been suggested as a reason for varying effects in rehabilitation of patellar tendinopathy using different eccentric squat exercises and devices. The aim was to characterize the magnitude and pattern of mechanical load at the knee and on the patellar tendon during four types of eccentric squat. METHODS: Subjects performed squats with a submaximal free weight and with maximal effort in a device for eccentric overloading (Bromsman), on a decline board and horizontal surface. Kinematics was recorded with a motion-capture system, reaction forces with force plates, and electromyography from three leg muscles with surface electrodes. Inverse dynamics was used to calculate knee joint kinetics. FINDINGS: Eccentric work, mean and peak patellar tendon force, and angle at peak force were greater (25-30%) for squats on decline board compared to horizontal surface with free weight, but not in Bromsman. Higher knee load forces (60-80%), but not work, were observed with Bromsman than free weight. Angular excursions at the knee and ankle were larger with decline board, particularly with free weight, and smaller in Bromsman than with free weight. Mean electromyography was greater on a decline board for gastrocnemius (13%) and vastus medialis (6%) with free weight, but in Bromsman only for gastrocnemius (7%). INTERPRETATION: The results demonstrated clear differences in the biomechanical loading on the knee during different squat exercises. Quantification of such differences provides information that could be used to explain differences in rehabilitation effects as well as in designing more optimal rehabilitation exercises for patellar tendinopathy.

  • 4.
    Gago, Paulo
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC).
    Arndt, Anton
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC). Karolinska Institutet.
    Marques, Mário C.
    University of Beira Interior (UBI), Covilhã, Portugal.
    Marinho, Daniel A.
    University of Beira Interior (UBI), Covilhã, Portugal.
    Ekblom, Maria
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC).
    Effects of post activation potentiation on electromechanical delay2019Inngår i: Clinical Biomechanics, ISSN 0268-0033, E-ISSN 1879-1271, Vol. 70, s. 115-122Artikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert)
    Abstract [en]

    Electromechanical delay (EMD) presumably depends upon both contractile and tensile factors. It has recently been used as an indirect measure of muscle tendon stiffness to study adaptations to stretching and training. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether contractile properties induced by a 6 s maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) could affect EMD without altering passive muscle tendon stiffness or stiffness index. Plantar flexor twitches were evoked via electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve in eight highly trained male sprinters before and after a 6 s MVIC in passive isometric or passively shortening or lengthening muscles. For each twitch, EMD, twitch contractile properties and SOLM-Wave were measured. Passive muscle tendon stiffness was measured from the slope of the relation between torque and ankle angle during controlled passive dorsal flexion and stiffness index by curve-fitting the torque angle data using a second-order polynomial function. EMD did not differ between isometric, lengthening or shortening movements. EMD was reduced by up to 11.56 ± 5.64% immediately after the MVIC and stayed depressed for up to 60 s after conditioning. Peak twitch torque and rate of torque development were potentiated by up to 119.41 ± 37.15% and 116.06 ± 37.39%, respectively. Rising time was reduced by up to 14.46 ± 7.22%. No significant changes occurred in passive muscle tendon stiffness or stiffness index. Using a conditioning MVIC, it was shown that there was an acute enhancement of contractile muscle properties as well as a significant reduction in EMD with no corresponding changes in stiffness. Therefore, caution should be taken when using and interpreting EMD as a proxy for muscle tendon stiffness.

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