Change search
Refine search result
1234 1 - 50 of 198
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Aujla, I. J.
    et al.
    University of Bedfordshire.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Redding, E.
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.
    Jobbins, V.
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.
    Developing talent among young dancers: Findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training2014In: Theatre, dance and performance training, ISSN 1944-3927, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 15-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The identification and development of talent is a key concern for many dance educators, yet little research has been conducted in the area. In order to understand better how to optimise dance talent development among young people, systematic and rigorous research is needed. This paper summarises and discusses the key findings of a ground-breaking longitudinal interdisciplinary research project into dance talent development. Over two years, almost 800 young dancers enrolled at one of the eight nationwide Centres for Advanced Training (CATs) participated in the project. Physical factors, psychological characteristics, and injury data were collected quantitatively while the students' thoughts and perspectives on commitment, creativity and cultural variables were captured using qualitative methods. The largest study of its kind, the project yielded a wide range of findings with a number of practical implications. The main focus of this paper is on how the project findings apply to important pedagogic topics such as audition criteria, passion and commitment, and teaching behaviour. The area of talent identification and development is complex, yet this research has begun to shed new light on the notion of talent and has provided novel insights to support its development.

  • 2. Aujla, Imogen J
    et al.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Redding, Emma
    Commitment, adherence and dropout among young talented dancers: Findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Aujla, Imogen J
    et al.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Redding, Emma
    Multidisciplinary predictors of adherence to contemporary dance training: findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training.2015In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 33, no 15, p. 1564-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the predictors of adherence in a dance context. The aim of this study was to investigate adherence to a dance talent programme using a multidisciplinary set of variables representing psychological correlates of adherence, maturation and physical factors relating to dance talent. Psychological (passion, motivational climate perceptions, eating attitudes), physical competence (vertical jump height, handgrip strength, hamstring flexibility, external hip rotation, aerobic fitness), and maturation-related (age of menarche) variables were gathered from female students enrolled on a dance talent programme. Participation behaviour (adherence/dropout) was collected from the talent programme's records approximately two years later. Logistic regression analysis of 287 participants revealed that greater levels of harmonious passion predicted greater likelihood of adherence to the programme, and greater ego-involving motivational climate perceptions predicted less likelihood of adherence. Neither measures of physical competence nor maturation distinguished adhering from dropout participants. Overall, the results of this study indicate that psychological factors are more important than physical competence and maturation in the participation behaviour of young talented dancers.

  • 4. Aujla, Imogen Jane
    et al.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Redding, Emma
    A qualitative investigation of commitment to dance: findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training.2014In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 138-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commitment to an activity forms an essential part of the talent development process, yet little is known about the reasons why young people commit to dance training. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors that affect young dancers’ commitment to a selective dance talent scheme. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 committed dancers and transcripts were content analysed. Enjoyment was the most important factor relating to commitment, and stemmed from several sources such as self-expression, movement sensations and feelings associated with performing. Relationships with dance peers and teachers, parental support and the opportunities available on the scheme also enhanced commitment. While some potential barriers to participation were identified, such as concerns about injury, these seemed insufficient to affect the participants’ commitment. The results of the study may help educators to develop young dancers’ talents optimally by enhancing their commitment to training. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]

  • 5. Aujla, Imogen
    et al.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Redding, Emma
    Perceptions of teacher behaviour predict students’ passion for dance.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Baltzell, Amy
    et al.
    Boston University.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Mindfulness Meditation Training for Sport (MMTS): Upgrade from version 1.0 to 2.0, and key 2.0 Self-Compassion Exercises.2017In: Proceedings from the 32th Annual Conference of the Association for the Applied Sport Psychology. Orlando, Florida, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7. Beck, Sarah
    et al.
    De'Ath, Stephanie
    Aujla, Imogen
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Redding, Emma
    Injury tracking in pre-vocational dancers.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8. Belz, Johanna
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Muestege, Jelena
    Professional development in sport psychology practitioners: merging PST and CBT2015In: Proceedings of The 14th European Congress of Sport Psychology (FEPSAC) 2015, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway .
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Exhaustion and cynicism needs to be targeted differently: a study among Paralympic coaches2016In: Proceedings from the 31th Annual Conference of the Association for the Applied Sport Psychology, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Hållbart ledarskap ur ett tränar- och coachperspektiv2016In: Utveckla ledarskapet: fakta, inspiration och reflektioner, Stockholm: SISU Idrottsböcker , 2016, p. 196-263Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med kapitlet är att presentera och diskutera teoretiska och praktiska frågor på ett sätt som främjar ett långlivat och hälsosamt ledarskap med fokus på tävlingsidrotten. Författarna utgår från det förenklade antagandet att «en coach som mår bra» sannolikt är mer framgångsrik och långlivad i jämförelse med en coach som mår dåligt. 

  • 11.
    Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Norges Idrottshögskola.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Lemyre, Pierre Nicolas
    Norges idrottshögskola.
    Elite football coaches experiences and sense making of being fired: an interpretative phenomenological analysis2017In: Proceedings of the 11th ICCE Global Coach Conference – Challenging sport coaching frontiers: the role of sports science and technology. Liverpool, England., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Norges Idrottshögskola.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Lemyre, Pierre Nicolas
    Norges Idrottshögskola.
    Well-being for sports coaches:: equality between coaches in abledbodied elite sport and paralympic sport?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences.
    Lemyre, Nicolas
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    A Comparison of High-Performance Football Coaches Experiencing High- Versus Low-Burnout Symptoms Across a Season of Play: Quality of Motivation and Recovery Matters2017In: International Sport Coaching Journal, ISSN 2328-918X, E-ISSN 2328-9198, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 133-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current study was to provide insights in how and why four head coaches in elite football experienced being either high or low in burnout symptoms (BS) during a competitive season. A longitudinal sequential quantitative-qualitative mixed method approach was used to enhance the understanding of coaches' experiences. First, data were collected using online questionnaires at the start and at the end of the competitive season with all coaches working at the Norwegian Elite Football League level. Second, in-depth interviews were conducted with four head coaches who were purposefully selected based on having the two highest and the two lowest burnout scores across the season compared with the overall sample. A quantitative approach was used to explore whether these four coaches differed when compared with the overall population on the associated variables: performance, budget, quality of motivation, perceived workload, work-home-interference (WHI), and recovery. A qualitative approach helped gain more insight in the experiences these four coaches had with possible onset variables. Analyses comparing the two sets of coaches, indicated no difference related to performance, budget and workload. However, the motivational profile, WHI, and ability to meet recovery demands were variables that contributed to explain differences in coaches' BS.

  • 14. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Basic Psychological Needs Thwarting and Shift in Quality of Motivation: Markers of Exhaustion in Professional Sport Coaches.2015In: Proceedings of the 10th ICCE Global Coach Conference – Coach and Athlete Empowerment: A Winning Combination, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Basic Psychological Needs Thwarting and Shift in Quality of Motivation: Markers of Exhaustion in Professional Sport Coaches.2014In: Sports Coaching Review, ISSN 2164-0629, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 101-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a qualitative retrospective approach, this paper investigates how some work-related demands led to burnout among four professional coaches. Self-determination theory (SDT) offered a sound theoretical framework to better understand the motivational process leading to serious negative outcomes (Ryan & Deci, 2002). Findings indicated that all coaches experienced working in a maladaptive environment, exemplified by experiencing very heavy workloads, a lack of leader support, and work-related conflicts. These experiences had a detrimental effect on the coaches' motivation. Psychological need thwarting and a shift towards a more controlled form of motivation explained why coaches became increasingly at risk for burning out, a process that evolved over time. All four coaches experienced a wide range of burnout symptoms. Findings from this study highlight the importance for sports organizations to better cater for the psychological needs of professional coaches to prevent burnout.

  • 16. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Change in Exhaustion in High-Performance Coaches in Association with Workload and Motivation: A Person-Centered Approach.2015In: Proceedings from the 30th Annual Conference of the Association for the Applied Sport Psychology, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Changes in Motivation and Burnout Indices in High-Performance Coaches Over The Course of a Competitive Season2016In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 28-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being subject to a great range of demands is believed to increase burnout propensity in high-performance coaches. This study is the first to explore whether the 4-step self-determination theory process model is a valuable framework to better understand the process influencing burnout and well-being in high-performance coaches (N = 343, M = 40.33 years) throughout a competitive season. Findings indicated that coaches on average increased in burnout and decreased in well-being. Hypotheses were to a large extent supported: change in perceived environment → change in psychological need satisfaction → change in autonomous motivation → change in burnout and well-being.

  • 18. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Determinants of Burnout in high-level sport coaches2013In: Proceedings from the annual North American Society for the Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity (NASPSPA) 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Development of Exhaustion for High-level Coaches in Association with Workload and Motivation – a Personal Centered Approach2016In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 22, p. 10-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The aim of the current study was twofold. First, to explore whether there were different trajectories of exhaustion among high-performance coaches over the course of a competitive season. Then, to investigate whether workload-related variables and motivational regulations were associated with exhaustion class membership.

    Methods and design

    299 high-performance coaches responded to an online survey at the start, middle, and end of a competitive season, assessing exhaustion, workload, work home interference (WHI), recovery, and motivational regulations. Latent class growth analyses were used to identify different trajectories of perceived exhaustion. Further, multinomial logistic regression examined class associations for workload-related variables and motivational regulations at the start and at the end of competitive season.

    Results

    Four different trajectories of perceived exhaustion among coaches were identified, termed respectively “High” (10%), “Increase” (15%), “Decrease” (4%) and “Low” (71%). Higher levels of workload and WHI were associated to classes with higher levels of exhaustion. Higher levels of recovery, and intrinsic and identified regulations were associated to classes with lower levels of exhaustion. Adaptive and maladaptive profiles were identified.

    Conclusions

    Different trajectories of exhaustion among high-performance coaches over the course of a competitive season were found. A maladaptive profile was associated with higher perceived workload and WHI, as well as lower levels of recovery, intrinsic and identified regulations, when compared to the adaptive profile.

  • 20. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Variation in the ability to meet recovery demands explains susceptibility to burnout in elite soccer coaches.2015In: Proceedings from The 20th annual congress of the European College of Sport Science (ECSS 2015), 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Benzten, Marte
    et al.
    Norges Idrottshögskola.
    Richter, Anne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Lemyre, Nicolas
    Norges Idrottshögskola.
    The impact of job insecurity and value on psychological well- and ill-being among high performance coaches.2017In: Proceedings of the 11th ICCE Global Coach Conference – Challenging sport coaching frontiers: the role of sports science and technology. Liverpool, England., 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group. Karolinska Insitutet.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Karolinska institutet.
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Genetic susceptibility to burnout in a Swedish twin cohort.2012In: European Journal of Epidemiology, ISSN 0393-2990, E-ISSN 1573-7284, Vol. 27, p. 225-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most previous studies of burnout have focused on work environmental stressors, while familial factors so far mainly have been overlooked. The aim of the study was to estimate the relative importance of genetic influences on burnout (measured with Pines Burnout Measure) in a sample of monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) Swedish twins. The study sample consisted of 20,286 individuals, born 1959–1986 from the Swedish twin registry who participated in the cross-sectional study of twin adults: genes and environment. Probandwise concordance rates (the risk for one twin to be affected given that his/her twin partner is affected by burnout) and within pair correlations were calculated for MZ and DZ same—and opposite sexed twin pairs. Heritability coefficients i.e. the proportion of the total variance attributable to genetic factors were calculated using standard biometrical model fitting procedures. The results showed that genetic factors explained 33% of the individual differences in burnout symptoms in women and men. Environmental factors explained a substantial part of the variation as well and are thus important to address in rehabilitation and prevention efforts to combat burnout.

  • 23.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Svedberg, Pia
    The Importance of Genetic and Shared Environmental Factors for the Associations between Job Demands, Control, Support and Burnout.2013In: PloS one, ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 8, no 9, p. e75387-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within occupational health research, one of the most influential models is the Job Demands-Control-Support model. Numerous studies have applied the model to different domains, with both physical and psychological health outcomes, such as burnout. The twin design provides a unique and powerful research methodology for examining the effects of environmental risk factors on burnout while taking familial factors (genetic and shared environment) into account. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of familial factors on the associations of burnout with job demands, control and support. A total of 14 516 individuals from the Swedish Twin Registry, who were born between 1959 and 1986, and who participated in the Study of Twin Adults: Genes and Environment (STAGE) by responding to a web-based questionnaire in 2005, were included in the analyses. Of these, there were 5108 individuals in complete same-sex twin pairs. Co-twin control analyses were performed using linear mixed modeling, comparing between-pairs effects and within-pair effects, stratified also by zygosity and sex. The results indicate that familial factors are of importance in the association between support and burnout in both women and men, but not between job demands and burnout. There are also tendencies towards familial factors being involved in the association between control and burnout in men. These results offer increased understanding of the mechanisms involved in the associations between work stress and burnout.

  • 24.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Svedberg, Pia
    Applying the demand-control-support model on burnout in managers and non-managers.2016In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 110-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study the demand-control-support (DCS) model on burnout in male and female managers and non-managers, taking into account genetic and shared family environmental factors, contributing to the understanding of mechanisms of how and when work stress is related to burnout. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 5,510 individuals in complete same-sex twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry were included in the analyses. Co-twin control analyses were performed using linear mixed modeling, comparing between-pairs and within-pair effects, stratified by zygosity and sex. Findings – Managers scored higher on demands and control in their work than non-managers, and female managers seem to be particularly at risk for burnout facing more demands which are not reduced by a higher control as in their male counterparts. Co-twin analyses showed that associations between control and burnout as well as between demands and burnout seem to be affected by shared family environmental factors in male non-managers but not in male managers in which instead the associations between social support and burnout seem to be influenced by shared family environment. Practical implications – Taken together, the study offers knowledge that shared environment as well as sex and managerial status are important factors to consider in how DCS is associated to exhaustion. Originality/value – Using twin data with possibilities to control for genetics, shared environment, sex and age, this study offers unique insight into the DCS research, which focusses primarily on the workplace environment rather than individual factors.

  • 25.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Richter, Anne
    Hallsten, Lennart
    Svedberg, Pia
    The associations between job insecurity, depressive symptoms and burnout: The role of performance-based self-esteem2018In: Economic and Industrial Democracy, ISSN 0143-831X, E-ISSN 1461-7099, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 48-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite agreement on the negative effects of job insecurity, more knowledge needs to be generated on the health effects in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms and for whom job insecurity has these negative effects. The present study aims to investigate the associations between job insecurity and burnout and depressive symptoms respectively, by studying the moderation influences of performance-based self-esteem (PBSE), a form of contingent self-esteem. A population-based sample with 4145 twins was used. The results showed that job insecurity was significantly associated with both burnout and depressive symptoms, and that PBSE acted as a moderator, so that the associations were stronger for individuals with high PBSE than for individuals with low PBSE. The study contributes by including a personality characteristic to gain more knowledge about the mechanisms of job insecurity on mental ill-health, and by illustrating that job insecurity has an impact on severe health outcomes in terms of burnout and depressive symptoms.

  • 26.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergstrom, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Div Intervent & Implementat Res, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mather, Lisa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stress in paid and unpaid work as related to cortisol and subjective health complaints in women working in the public health care sector2017In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 286-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Focusing on 420 women employed within the woman-dominated health care sector, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how any variation in their total workload (TWL) in terms of paid and unpaid work relate to various subjective health complaints (SHC) (n = 420) and the neuroendocrine stress marker cortisol (n = 68). Design/methodology/approach - The authors explored how any variation in their TWL in terms of paid and unpaid work related cross-sectionally to SHC (n = 420), and the neuroendocrine stress marker cortisol (n = 68). Findings - Hierarchical regression analyses showed that stress of unpaid work was most strongly related to diurnal variations in cortisol. Both stress of paid and unpaid work as well as TWL stress, but not hours spent on TWL, were related to SHC. Practical implications - Taken together, objective measures of hours spent on various TWL domains were unrelated to outcome measures while perceptions of having too much TWL and TWL stress were linked to both cortisol and SHC, i.e. how individuals perceive a situation seem to be more important for health than the actual situation, which has implications for research and efforts to reduce individual TWL. Originality/value - This study is unique in showing that unpaid work and perceptions having too much TWL relate to stress markers in women working in the public health care sector.

  • 27.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Sverke, Magnus
    Bodin, Lennart
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Lindfors, Petra
    Svedberg, Pia
    Work-home interference and burnout: a study based on Swedish twins.2014In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, ISSN 1076-2752, E-ISSN 1536-5948, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 361-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: This study sets out to investigate the impact of work-home interference on burnout in women and men, while taking genetic and family environmental factors into account.

    METHODS: A total of 4446 Swedish twins were included in the study. The effects of work-home conflict (WHC) and home-work conflict (HWC) on burnout between and within pairs were analyzed with co-twin control analyses.

    RESULTS: Both WHC and HWC were significantly associated with burnout. Genetic factors may be involved in the association between HWC and burnout in women. Familial factors were not involved for WHC and burnout, neither for women nor for men.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study shows the importance to encounter WHC per se to prevent burnout. Because of genetic confounding in HWC and burnout in women, preventive efforts may also take into account individual characteristics.

  • 28.
    Carlsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Låg kunskap om trötthet ger tröttare idrottare2013In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 28-32Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    En intervjustudie med idrottare och deras tränare visar på likheter, men också en del intressanta skillnader i sättet att se på trötthetsbegreppet. Artikeln diskuterar vad det kan bero på och ger förslag på hur tränare kan bli bättre på att läsa av sina utövares trötthet.

  • 29.
    Carlsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    The Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S): A psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study validated a Swedish version of the 47-item Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS-S). Sample 1 consisted of 506 team sport athletes [262 men and 244 women; mean age: 22.20, standard deviation (SD) = 3.90] distributed across 41 coaches at the two highest national levels of various sports. Athletes completed the CBS-S and established questionnaires of coaching behaviors (LSS), self-confidence (CSAI-2R), and coach-athlete relationship (CART-Q). An additional sample of 39 basketball players (21 men and 18 women; mean age = 17.40, SD = 2.39) completed the CBS-S twice, approximately 4 weeks apart. Confirmatory factor analysis showed an acceptable model fit for the seven-factor version of the CBS-S, although two items of the negative personal rapport subscale displayed insufficient factor loadings. Correlations between the subscales of the CBS-S and established instruments were in accordance with theoretical expectations, supporting the concurrent validity. Cronbach's alpha (> 0.82) for all dimensions provided support for the reliability of the CBS-S, and test-retest correlations indicated moderate stability over time. Cultural differences in the assessment of coaching behaviors and the usability of the CBS-S by coaches for self-reflection and development are discussed.

  • 30.
    Clements, Lucie
    et al.
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Chappell, Kerry
    University of Exeter.
    Watson, Debbie
    Redding, Emma
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music & Dance.
    May, Jon
    University of Plymouth.
    The development and validation of a dance-specific creativity questionnaire.: 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31. Davis, P.
    et al.
    Gustafsson, H.
    Skoog, T.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Haberl, P.
    Mindfulness and the Relation with Stress, Affect and Burnout in Elite Junior Athletes2014In: Proceedings from The 19th annual congress of the European College of Sport Science (ECSS 2014): Sport Science around the Canals, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 32. De'Ath, Stephanie
    et al.
    Quin, Edel
    Redding, Emma
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Aujla, Imogen
    An inquiry into the correlation between knee injuries and hypermobility.2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33. Dieffenbach, Kristen
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Sheehy, Tammy
    Olusoga, Peter
    Self-awareness: What elite coaches say about the value and development with a high performance environment.2015In: Proceedings of the 10th ICCE Global Coach Conference – Coach and Athlete Empowerment: A Winning Combination, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Eib, Constanze
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Schwarz, Ulrica von Thiele
    Stockholm University.
    Blom, Victoria
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group. Karolinska Institutet.
    Don't Let It Get to You! A Moderated Mediated Approach to the (In)Justice-Health Relationship2015In: Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, ISSN 1076-8998, E-ISSN 1939-1307, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 434-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the consequences of overall justice perceptions on employees' mental health and work-family conflict. While many studies have found that perceiving injustice at work is harmful, little is known about the underlying processes. Based on the allostatic load model, it is hypothesized that mental preoccupation with work, defined as a cognitive state, is a mediator linking overall justice perceptions to employee health. Moreover, we argue that locus of control is a moderator for the mediated relationship. We tested our hypotheses with panel data consisting of 412 Swedish office workers. Results support that mental preoccupation with work mediates the relationship between overall justice and mental health, and overall justice and work-family conflict. Results also reveal that mental preoccupation with work plays a greater mediating role for individuals with an external locus of control. Implications and suggestions for future studies on the emerging relationship between organizational justice and health are discussed.

  • 35.
    Ekblom, Maria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Blom, Victoria
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Kallings, Lena
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Nooijen, Carla F J
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Fysisk aktivitet och hjärnhälsa2018In: Fysioterapi, ISSN 1653-5804, no 5, p. 32-35Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Psykisk ohälsa är den vanligaste orsaken till sjukskrivning. Fysisk aktivitet kan förebygga många former av ohälsa, men vilka fysiska aktivitetsmönster som gynnar psykisk hälsa och kognitiva förmågor är fortfarande okänt. Denna typ av forskning är komplex och kräver samarbete med många olika aktörer i samhället.

  • 36. Ekstedt, Mirjam
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Återhämtning självklart för elitidrottare ... men inte för yrkesarbetare2011In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, no 36, p. 1684-1687Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Högpresterande människor i arbetslivet och idrotten möter likartade krav på prestation, engagemang och uthållighet.

    Hur väl idrottare lyckas upprätthålla hälsa och prestationsutveckling trots hög belastning bestäms i huvudsak av den psykofysiologiska återhämtningsprocessen, vars främsta syfte är att eliminera trötthet och återställa vitalitet.

    Därför utbildas idrottare till att bli medvetna om sitt återhämtningsbehov och hur det ska tillgodoses.

    Människor i yrkeslivet där­emot möter ofta hög belastning med nedprioritering av sin sömn och återhämtning.En förutsättning för ett långsiktigt engagemang är att tidigt upptäcka tecken på dysfunktionell återhämtning och främja miljöer med utrymme för dynamisk växling mellan anspänning och vila.

  • 37.
    Fahlström, Per Göran
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Glemme, Mats
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Hageskog, Carl-Axel
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Linnér, Susanne
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Friidrottens elitcoacher om sin egen kompetens2013In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 27-31Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Framgångar före och under ett VM ställer stora och olika krav på coachernas kompetens. Behovet av en kontinuerlig kompetensutveckling är stort, men enligt coacherna själva är det inget som sker systematiskt. Det är den egna drivkraften som styr utvecklingen.

  • 38.
    Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Birgegård, Andreas
    Karolinska institutet.
    Clinton, David
    Karolinska institutet.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Palmberg, Karolina
    Föreningen Tjejzonen.
    Selenius, Sofia
    I Care, Riksföreningen mot ätstörningar, Frisk & Fri.
    Tvångsmässig träning måste tas på allvar2018In: Läkartidningen, ISSN 0023-7205, E-ISSN 1652-7518, Vol. 115, article id E7T1Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39. Gajic, Jelena
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Theoretical and empirical comparison of applied sport psychology activities between Serbia and Sweden2011In: Book of abstracts from International Scientific Conference about Effects of physical activity application to anthropological status with children, youth and adults., 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40. Glemne, Mats
    et al.
    Fahlström, Per Göran
    Hageskog, Carl-Axel
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Linnér, Susanne
    London calling – OS 2012 är målet för Coachteamet2011In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 29-33Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Ett samverkansprojekt om coaching vid mästerskap pågår mellan Linnéuniversitetet och Svenska Friidrottsförbundet. Projektet Coachteamet har gett fruktbara möten mellan akademi och elitidrott; forskning och utbildning. Samtidigt visar hittills gjorda erfarenheter att det behövs tid för att överbrygga bland annat kulturella skillnader.

  • 41.
    Golding, Alison
    et al.
    Department of Dance Science, Trinity Laban, London, UK.
    Boes, Claudia
    School of Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Investigating learning through developmental dance movement as a kinaesthetic tool in the Early Years Foundation Stage2016In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 235-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of the significance of movement to learning benefits from advances in neuroscience. This study considered a neurophysiological perspective in relation to the educational theory of Accelerated Learning (AL) for which little empirical evidence exists. Childhood development themes and learning strategies from a neurophysical-psychological viewpoint were investigated through the use of developmental dance movement (DDM) as a kinaesthetic tool over an eight-session programme with three early years practitioners and two reception classes in two UK primary schools. The research strategy included both qualitative and quantitative methods to capture examples of accelerated learning and transfer. Qualitative data from three semi-structured interviews with early years practitioners was based on their observations of intervention sessions on a whole-group level and selected case studies of children in their class. The data were analysed with the aim of addressing their views on the children’s learning, which influenced and elucidated the practitioners own learning outcomes. Quantitative methods utilised the Goodenough–Harris draw-a-person test with participating children to explore change in visual-motor integration and developmental maturity as a measure of accelerated learning and transfer. Findings supported neuroscientific research and highlighted useful and contradictory aspects of AL theory. Practitioners were able to identify benefits for pupils with specific learning needs. Case studies demonstrated accelerated learning through observed changed behaviour. T-test results from Aston index pre-post scored drawings showed significant differences (p = 0.005) in visual-motor integration and developmental maturity. It is concluded that DDM can provide opportunity for physical/cognitive advancement for young children.

  • 42. Goodger, K
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Professional practice issues in athlete burnout2012In: Professional Practice in Sport Psychology / [ed] S. Hanton & SD. Mellalieu, New York: Routledge, 2012, p. 133-164Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 43.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstads universitet.
    Davis, Paul
    Skoog, Therese
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Haberl, Peter
    Mindfulness and its Relationship with Perceived Stress, Affect and Burnout in Elite Junior Athletes2015In: Journal of Clinical Sport Psychology, ISSN 1932-9261, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 263-281Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro universiet.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Burnout in athletes: A comparison between team and individual sports2006In: Proceedings of the 11th European College of Sports Sciences (ECSS) congress. Schweiz: Lausanne, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45. Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Athlete burnout: an integrated model and future research directions2011In: International Review of Sport and Exercise Psychology, ISSN 1750-984X, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 3-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Athlete burnout is a multifaceted phenomenon. As a consequence, several attempts have been made to describe it from both a process and a state perspective. A number of theories and models exist that deal with the process of burning out and/or its antecedents. When viewed separately, the presented findings may be perceived as contradicting each other, or at best as confusing. To advance the field, we offer a comprehensive review of what is presently known within the area of athlete burnout and what new knowledge is needed. Furthermore, we suggest an integrated model of athlete burnout. This model includes major antecedents, early signs, consequences, and factors related to personality, coping and the environment. Our purpose is not to present the definitive model but to create a conceptual understanding of the field as it is seen today, and thereby stimulate empirical research to further advance the knowledge base.

  • 46.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Prevalence of burnout in adolescent athletes2007In: The Sport psychologist, ISSN 0888-4781, E-ISSN 1543-2793, no 21, p. 21-37Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Karlstad universitet.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Hassmén, Peter
    Psykologiska institutionen, Stockholms universitet .
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Durand-Bush, Natalie
    Ottawa University.
    The process of burnout: A multiple case study of three elite endurance athletes2007In: International Journal of Sport Psychology, ISSN 0047-0767, no 38, p. 388-416Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48. Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Podlog, Lesley
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Positive psychology and elite sport: a potential nurturing relationship?2013In: Proceedings from The 13th European Congress of Psychology (ECP 2013)., 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 49. Gustafsson, Henrik
    et al.
    Skoog, Therese
    Podlog, Leslie
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Wagnsson, Stefan
    Hope and Athlete Burnout: Stress and Affect as Mediators2013In: Psychology of Sport And Exercise, ISSN 1469-0292, E-ISSN 1878-5476, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 640-649Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In this study we examined the relationship between trait hope and burnout in elite junior soccer players and whether stress and positive and negative affect mediated this relationship.

    Methods

    Participants were 238 Swedish soccer players (166 males, 71 females; one did not indicate gender) aged 15–19 years who completed questionnaires measuring trait hope, perceived stress, positive and negative affect, and athlete burnout (i.e., emotional/physical exhaustion, a reduced sense of accomplishment, and sport devaluation).

    Results

    Bivariate correlations were consistent with hope theory contentions indicating significant negative relationships between hope and all three burnout dimensions. The relationship between hope and emotional/physical exhaustion was fully mediated by stress and positive affect. For sport devaluation and reduced sense of accomplishment, stress and positive affect partially mediated the relationship with hope. In contrast, negative affect did not mediate the relationship between hope and any of the burnout dimensions.

    Conclusion

    The results support earlier findings that hope is negatively related to athlete burnout. Support was also found for the hypothesis that high hope individuals would experience less stress and therefore less burnout. Promoting hope may be relevant in reducing the likelihood of this detrimental syndrome.

  • 50. Gustafsson, Linnea
    et al.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Källor till stress och medvetenhet om återhämtningsbehov hos elitorienterare: En kvalitativ studie2014In: Årsbok: Svensk idrottspsykologisk förening (SIPF), 2013, Vol. 11, p. 34-59Article in journal (Other academic)
1234 1 - 50 of 198
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf