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  • 1.
    Åstrand, PO
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Bergh, U
    Kilbom, A
    A 33-yr follow-up of peak oxygen uptake and related variables of former physical education students.1997In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 1844-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1949, 27 female and 26 male physical education students were studied at a mean age of 22 and 25 yr, respectively. They were restudied in 1970 and 1982. Measurements included oxygen uptake, heart rate, and pulmonary ventilation during submaximal and maximal exercise on a cycle ergometer and treadmill. After 21 yr, peak aerobic power was significantly reduced, from 2.90 to 2.18 l/min and from 4.09 to 3.28 l/min for women and men, respectively. After another 12 yr, the 1970 maxima were not reduced further. From 1949 to 1982 there was a decrease in peak heart rate from 196 to 177 beats/min in women and from 190 to 175 beats/min in men (P < 0.05). Highest pulmonary ventilation did not change significantly. At an oxygen uptake of 1.5 l/min, the heart rate was the same in 1949 as in 1982. In conclusion, the physical fitness level of the subjects was well above average for these ages. From 1970 to 1982 there was no decline in the average peak aerobic power, a finding possibly related to increased habitual physical activity.

  • 2.
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Age, physical fitness and health.1994In: Sborník lékar̆ský, ISSN 0036-5327, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 59-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Celsing, F
    et al.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Sylvén, C
    Everett, J
    Åstrand, PO
    Effects of chronic iron deficiency anaemia on myoglobin content, enzyme activity, and capillary density in the human skeletal muscle.1988In: Acta medica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6101, Vol. 223, no 5, p. 451-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of chronic iron deficiency anaemia on myoglobin content, maximal enzyme activities and capillarization in the human skeletal muscle was investigated. Muscle samples from musculus vastus lateralis were screened in an Indonesian population. The causes of iron deficiency were chronic intestinal bleeding or repeated pregnancy combined with low iron intake. The maximal activities of iron-dependent and non-iron-dependent glycolytic and oxidative enzymes as well as myoglobin showed similar values in the iron-deficient group and the matched control group. The activities of the oxidative enzymes in both the iron-deficient group and the controls were lower, however, compared even to untrained Swedish subjects. The capillary density was essentially within a normal range in both groups. It is concluded that chronic iron deficiency anaemia of a moderate or severe degree, with Hb concentrations of about 80-100 g.1(-1), does not cause an impaired biochemical function of the human skeletal muscle.

  • 4.
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Exercise physiology and its role in disease prevention and in rehabilitation.1987In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 68, no 5 Pt 1, p. 305-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is an impressive fact that many musicians can perform perfectly at an advanced age. Arthur Rubenstein played very demanding compositions of Chopin at the age of 88 and Andre Segovia at the age of 91 is still giving concerts on the classical guitar. Apparently, through practice very demanding neuromuscular activities can be maintained at advanced ages. Yet hours of daily "training" are behind these achievements. This review discusses some of the general aspects of training and their effects on function and health. As an overall goal it is more important to add life to years rather than add years to life.

  • 5. Saltin, Bengt
    et al.
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Free fatty acids and exercise.1993In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 57, no 5 Suppl, p. 752S-757S; discussion 757SArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the great explorers were well aware that eating fat was an efficient way to meet their large energy demand, it was not until some decades into this century that it could be demonstrated that lipids are metabolized directly by contracting skeletal muscles. The 1950s produced the first studies with [14C]-tagged fatty acids (FAs), proving that fat is transported into the cell as FAs. An FA-transporting protein that is present in the sarcolemma and in the cytoplasma has been identified. For FA transport into the mitochondria, carnitine and carnitine transferase are needed. It is still unclear how the use of lipids as an energy source for the muscle during exercise is limited. The supply of free fatty acids (FFAs) far exceeds what is taken up by the muscle. Seldom more than 2-4% of the amount of FFAs delivered to an exercising limb is taken up by the muscles and only part of it is oxidized. Physical training induces changes that enhance the uptake of FAs by the contracting muscles, and a larger fraction of this uptake is oxidized, but it is not yet clear which mechanism is behind this adaptation. What is known is that this uptake occurs despite no elevation in the amount of FA supplied to the limb.

  • 6.
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    From exercise physiology to preventive medicine.1988In: Annals of clinical research, ISSN 0003-4762, Vol. 20, no 1-2, p. 10-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study of the normal human individual provides an important baseline for the study of disease. Exercise physiology is particularly important because an exercise situation provides a unique opportunity to study how different functions are coordinated and integrated. In fact, most functions and structures are in one way or another affected by acute and chronic (i.e. training) exercise. There is unanimous agreement that regular exercise is essential for optimal function of the human body. It is evident that extrinsic factors, such as diet and exercise habits, are reflected in the morbidity and mortality statistics, especially in aging. Both healthy individuals and those with chronic illnesses and functional handicaps can improve their performances and, therefore, their quality of life by increased physical activity. In my opinion, epidemiological research has established that physical inactivity from a medical viewpoint is a risk factor threatening health and an optimal life style. Adverse effects of non-competitive exercises are very small in comparison with health benefits.

  • 7. Åstrand, Per-Olof
    et al.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Ekblom, Bjorn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Född Till rörelse: En bok om kost och motion2011Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Praktiskt taget alla vuxna svenskar anser att regelbunden motion är bra för hälsa och arbetsförmåga. Vi är också upplysta om hur våra matvanor, alkoholintag och rökning påverkar vår hälsa. Varför är det då en minoritet som har en livsstil som styrs av kunskap och förnuft? Finns svaret förankrat i vårt biologiska arv? Hur levde våra förfäder? Att sitta still i flera timmar utan att röra sig alls utgör en risk för utveckling av hjärt- och kärlsjukdom, cancer och annan ohälsa, trots att man kanske motionerar ett par gånger i veckan. Den fysiologiska förklaringen är den att om inte musklerna får arbeta regelbundet, om än mycket lite, så påverkas viktiga processer i musklerna, som sedan påverkar hela kroppen. Det räcker att regelbundet resa sig och gå en liten bit för att undvika de negativa effekterna av långvarigt sittande.I Född till rörelse kan du läsa om faktorer som har betydelse för vår kondition och hälsa. Varför är det så viktigt att vi rör på oss? Hur kan man motverka eller mildra effekten av vissa sjukdomar? Vad innebär det att vara fysiskt aktiv? Hur ska man träna och hur jobbigt bör det vara?

  • 8. Nie, Z T
    et al.
    Lisjö, S
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, J
    In-vitro stimulation on the rat epitrochlearis muscle. II. Effects of catecholamines and nutrients on protein degradation and amino acid metabolism.1989In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 135, no 4, p. 523-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of catecholamines and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) plus insulin on protein degradation and amino acid metabolism was investigated in isolated and electrically stimulated rat epitrochlearis muscles. 10(-7) M adrenaline significantly increased the total amount of muscle tyrosine during 40 min of stimulation with 50 Hz (I s min 1) pulse trains. On the other hand, BCAA + insulin at normal and five times normal plasma concentrations had no effect on muscle tyrosine. Muscle 3- methylhistidine was not influenced by any of the treatments. Muscle release and content of aspartate, alanine, glutamate and glutamine showed individual response characteristics to catecholamines and BCAA + insulin. The data indicate that adrenaline can induce an increased total protein degradation in rat fast muscle during acute contractions in vitro and, furthermore, that BCAA + insulin does not retard protein breakdown during acute muscle contraction.

  • 9.
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    J.B. Wolffe Memorial Lecture. "Why exercise?".1992In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 153-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a pronounced plasticity and adaptability in the structural and/or functional properties of cells, tissues, and organ systems in the human body when exposed to various stimuli. While there is unanimous agreement that regular exercise is essential for optimal function of the human body, it is evident that extrinsic factors, such as diet and exercise habits, are reflected in the morbidity and mortality statistics, especially in the aged. Aging is obligatorily associated with reduced maximal aerobic power and reduced muscle strength, i.e., with reduced physical fitness. As a consequence of diminished exercise tolerance, a large and increasing number of elderly persons will be living below, at, or just above "thresholds" of physical ability, needing only a minor intercurrent illness to render them completely dependent. Physical training can readily produce a profound improvement of functions essential for physical fitness in old age. Adaptability to regular physical activity serves to cause less disruption of the cell's "milieu interieur" and minimizes fatigue, thereby enhancing performance and the economy of energy output during exercise.

  • 10. Bergh, U
    et al.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Maximal oxygen uptake "classical" versus "contemporary" viewpoints.2000In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 85-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In two articles Timothy Noakes proposes a new physiological model in which skeletal muscle recruitment is regulated by a central "govenor," specifically to prevent the development of a progressive myocardial ischemia that would precede the development of skeletal muscle anaerobiosis during maximal exercise. In this rebuttal to the Noakes' papers, we argue that Noakes has ignored data supporting the existing hypothesis that under normal conditions cardiac output is limiting maximal aerobic power during dynamic exercise engaging large muscle groups.

  • 11.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Randall-Fox, Emily
    Hutchison, Wallace
    Tydén, Anders
    Åstrand, Per-Olof
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Muscle fibre type distribution, muscle cross-sectional area and maximal voluntary strength in humans1983In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 117, p. 219-226Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Moritani, T
    et al.
    Oddsson, L
    Thorstensson, Alf
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Astrand, P O
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Neural and biomechanical differences between men and young boys during a variety of motor tasks.1989In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 137, no 3, p. 347-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The adaptation in activation patterns of the ankle extensor muscles to different functional demands was studied in adult men (n = 10) and 9-year-old boys (n = 10). The relative magnitude of the activation of the slow soleus (SOL) and the relatively fast medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle was measured during various postures and hopping tasks on a force plate. In addition, the myo-electric activity was quantified in three different phases of the stretch-shortening cycles during hopping. Major differences between boys and adults were observed in the postural tasks, where the boys appeared to utilize the MG to a relatively larger extent. During maximal height hopping there was a clearly larger potentiation of the MG activity in the adults, particularly in the eccentric phase. On the other hand, there were striking similarities between boys and adults with respect to the degree of pre-activation of both muscles during the different hopping regimes as well as potentiation of muscle activity during the concentric phase of maximal height hopping. Thus, some aspects of the selective neural control of the ankle extensor muscles appear to be manifested in pre-pubertal boys. However, the data also indicate that other factors, such as utilization of stored elastic energy in the muscles and stretch reflex potentiation, will still continue to develop from the age of nine.

  • 13.
    Åstrand, PO
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Physical activity and fitness.1992In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, ISSN 0002-9165, E-ISSN 1938-3207, Vol. 55, no 6 Suppl, p. 1231S-1236SArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is unanimous agreement that regular exercise is essential for optimal function of the human body. It is evident that extrinsic factors, such as diet and exercise habits, are reflected in the morbidity and mortality statistics, especially in aging. Aging is obligatorily associated with reduced maximal aerobic power and reduced muscle strength, ie, with reduced physical fitness. As a consequence of diminished exercise tolerance, a large and increasing number of elderly people will be living below, at, or just above "thresholds" of physical ability, needing only a minor intercurrent illness to render them completely dependent. Physical training can readily produce a profound improvement of functions also essential for physical fitness in old age. From a nutritional viewpoint one advantage of physical activity, and increased metabolic rate, is that a higher energy intake can better secure an adequate intake of essential nutrients.

  • 14.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Åstrand, Per-Olof
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Physiological characteristics of classical ballet1984In: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 472-476Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, The Research Unit for Movement, Health and Environment.
    Åstrand, Per-Olof
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Gyllensten, Lars
    Unika parkområden hotade: Ge Brunnsvikenområdet skydd som nationell kulturpark manar debattörer1991Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
1 - 15 of 15
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