Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Houdijk, H.
    et al.
    ter Hoeve, N.
    Nooijen, Carla
    Research Institute MOVE, Faculty of Human Movement Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Rijntjes, D.
    Tolsma, M.
    Lamoth, C.
    Energy expenditure of stroke patients during postural control tasks2010In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 321-6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two common impairments in patients after stroke are loss of balance control and fatigue. We propose that both could be inter-related. The purpose of this study was to investigate the metabolic energy demand for balance control in patients after stroke during upright standing. Ten stroke patients and 12 able-bodied controls performed four 5-min upright standing tasks on a force plate; unperturbed (SU), blindfolded (SUB), on foam surface (SUF) and with feet parallel against each other (SUP). Metabolic energy expenditure, posturography measures and muscle activity (EMG) of lower leg muscles were measured. Patients required on average 125% (33Jkg(-1)s(-1)) more metabolic energy for upright standing under the various conditions than controls. In addition, balance manipulation significantly (p<0.05) affected energy expenditure (21% higher in SUB, 52% in SUF, 40% in SUP compared to SU). Although the increase in energy expenditure was on average twice as high in patients than controls no significant group by condition interaction effect was found. Overall correlations between posturography measures, EMG and energy expenditure (r=0.33-0.60) were significant (p<0.001). We conclude that impaired balance control puts an extra demand on the energy expenditure during motor activities in stroke patients. This should be considered when prescribing interventions aimed at reducing physiological strain.

  • 2.
    Nooijen, C. F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    Stam, H. J.
    Schoenmakers, I.
    Sluis, T. A.
    Post, M. W.
    Twisk, J. W.
    Group, A. A.
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    Working mechanisms of a behavioural intervention promoting physical activity in persons with subacute spinal cord injury2016In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 583-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: In order to unravel the working mechanisms that underlie the effectiveness of a behavioural intervention promoting physical activity in persons with subacute spinal cord injury, the aim of this study was to assess the mediating effects of physical and psychosocial factors on the intervention effect on physical activity. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Four rehabilitation centres in the Netherlands. SUBJECTS: Thirty-nine persons with subacute spinal cord injury. INTERVENTION: Behavioural intervention promoting an active lifestyle, based on motivational interviewing. The intervention involved a total of 13 individual sessions beginning 2 months before and ending 6 months after discharge from initial inpatient rehabilitation. MAIN MEASURES: The potential mediating effects of fatigue, pain, depression, illness cognition, exercise self-efficacy, coping and social support on the effect of the behavioural intervention on objectively measured physical activity (B = 0.35 h, p < 0.01) were studied. Measurements were performed at baseline, discharge, 6 months and 1 year after discharge. RESULTS: No single factor was found that strongly mediated the effect of the behavioural intervention on physical activity; however, multiple factors could partly explain the effect. Mediating effects greater than 10% were found for proactive coping (17.6%), exercise self-efficacy (15.9%), pain disability (15.3%) and helplessness (12.5%). DISCUSSION: Proactive coping (the ability to anticipate and deal with potential threats before they occur), exercise self-efficacy (self-confidence with respect to performing exercise and daily physical activities), pain disability (interference by pain of daily activities) and helplessness (emphasizing the aversive meaning of the disease) are important concepts in interventions promoting physical activity in persons with subacute spinal cord injury.

  • 3.
    Nooijen, C. F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    Stam, H. J.
    Sluis, T.
    Valent, L.
    Twisk, J.
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    A behavioral intervention promoting physical activity in people with subacute spinal cord injury: secondary effects on health, social participation and quality of life2017In: Clinical Rehabilitation, ISSN 0269-2155, E-ISSN 1477-0873, Vol. 31, no 6, p. 772-780Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess, for people with subacute spinal cord injury, if rehabilitation that is reinforced with the addition of a behavioral intervention to promote physical activity leads to a better health, participation and quality of life. DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Rehabilitation centers. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 39 participants analyzed (45 included), with subacute spinal cord injury in inpatient rehabilitation, dependent on a manual wheelchair (33% tetraplegia, 62% motor complete, 150 +/-74 days postinjury). INTERVENTION: A behavioral intervention promoting physical activity after discharge, involving 13 individual sessions delivered by a coach trained in motivational interviewing, beginning two months before and ending six months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. MAIN MEASURES: Physical capacity as determined during a maximal exercise test, body mass index, blood pressure, fasting lipid profile, and social participation (IMPACT-S) and quality of life (SF-36) were determined using questionnaires. Measurements were performed two months before discharge, at discharge, and six and 12 months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. B represents the between-group difference. RESULTS: Twelve months after discharge, significant intervention effects were found for diastolic blood pressure (B = -11.35 mmHg, 95% CI = -19.98 to -2.71), total cholesterol (B = -0.89 mmol/L, 95% CI = -1.59 to -0.20), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (B = -0.63 mmol/L, 95% CI = -1.25 to -0.00) and participation (B = 9.91, 95% CI = 3.34 to 16.48). CONCLUSIONS: A behavioral intervention promoting physical activity after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation improves social participation and seems to reduce risk factors for cardiovascular disease in people with subacute spinal cord injury.

  • 4.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam.
    de Groot, J. F.
    Stam, H. J.
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    Bussmann, H. B.
    Fit for the Future, Consortium
    Validation of an activity monitor for children who are partly or completely wheelchair-dependent2015In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 12, p. 11-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Children who are wheelchair-dependent are at risk for developing unfavorable physical behavior; therefore, assessment, monitoring and efforts to improve physical behavior should start early in life. VitaMove is an accelerometer-based activity monitor and can be used to detect and distinguish different categories of physical behavior, including activities performed in a wheelchair and activities using the legs. The purpose of this study was to assess the validity of the VitaMove activity monitor to quantify physical behavior in children who are partly or completely wheelchair-dependent. METHODS: Twelve children with spina bifida (SB) or cerebral palsy (CP) (mean age, 14 +/- 4 years) performed a series of wheelchair activities (wheelchair protocol) and, if possible, activities using their legs (n = 5, leg protocol). Activities were performed at their own home or school. In children who were completely wheelchair-dependent, VitaMove monitoring consisted of one accelerometer-based recorder attached to the sternum and one to each wrist. For children who were partly ambulatory, an additional recorder was attached to each thigh. Using video-recordings as a reference, primary the total duration of active behavior, including wheeled activity and leg activity, and secondary agreement, sensitivity and specificity scores were determined. RESULTS: Detection of active behaviour with the VitaMove activity monitor showed absolute percentage errors of 6% for the wheelchair protocol and 10% for the leg protocol. For the wheelchair protocol, the mean agreement was 84%, sensitivity was 80% and specificity was 85%. For the leg protocol, the mean agreement was 83%, sensitivity was 78% and specificity was 90%. Validity scores were lower in severely affected children with CP. CONCLUSIONS: The VitaMove activity monitor is a valid device to quantify physical behavior in children who are partly or completely wheelchair-dependent, except for severely affected children and for bicycling.

  • 5.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physical Therapy, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    de Groot, S.
    Postma, K.
    Bergen, M. P.
    Stam, H. J.
    Bussmann, J. B.
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    A more active lifestyle in persons with a recent spinal cord injury benefits physical fitness and health2012In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 50, no 4, p. 320-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: A prospective cohort study. OBJECTIVES: To study the longitudinal relationship between objectively measured everyday physical activity level, and physical fitness and lipid profile in persons with a recent spinal cord injury (SCI). SETTING: A rehabilitation centre in the Netherlands and the participant's home environment. METHODS: Data of 30 persons with a recent SCI were collected at the start of active rehabilitation, 3 months later, at discharge from inpatient rehabilitation, and 1 year after discharge. Physical activity level (duration of dynamic activities as % of 24 h) was measured with an accelerometry-based activity monitor. Regarding physical fitness, peak oxygen uptake (VO(2)peak) and peak power output (POpeak) were determined with a maximal wheelchair exercise test, and upper extremity muscle strength was measured with a handheld dynamometer. Fasting blood samples were taken to determine the lipid profile. RESULTS: An increase in physical activity level was significantly related to an increase in VO(2)peak and POpeak, and an increase in physical activity level favourably affected the lipid profile. A nonsignificant relation was found with muscle strength. CONCLUSION: Everyday physical activity seems to have an important role in the fitness and health of persons with a recent SCI. An increase in physical activity level was associated with an increase in physical fitness and with a lower risk of cardiovascular disease.

  • 6.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Galanti, M. R.
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Engstrom, K.
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Moller, J.
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Forsell, Y.
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Effectiveness of interventions on physical activity in overweight or obese children: a systematic review and meta-analysis including studies with objectively measured outcomes2017In: Obesity Reviews, ISSN 1467-7881, E-ISSN 1467-789X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 195-213Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is no consensus on interventions to be recommended in order to promote physical activity among overweight or obese children. The objective of this review was to assess the effects on objectively measured physical activity, of interventions promoting physical activity among overweight or obese children or adolescents, compared to no intervention or to interventions without a physical activity component. Publications up to December 2015 were located through electronic searches for randomized controlled trials resulting in inclusion of 33 studies. Standardized mean differences from baseline to post-intervention and to long-term follow-up were determined for intervention and control groups and meta-analysed using random effects models. The meta-analysis showed that interventions had no effect on total physical activity of overweight and obese children, neither directly post-intervention (-0.02 [-0.15, 0.11]) nor at long-term follow-up (0.07 [-0.27, 0.40]). Separate analyses by typology of intervention (with or without physical fitness, behavioural or environmental components) showed similar results (no effect). In conclusion, there is no evidence that currently available interventions are able to increase physical activity among overweight or obese children. This questions the contribution of physical activity to the treatment of overweight and obesity in children in the studied interventions and calls for other treatment strategies.

  • 7.
    Nooijen, Carla F J
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. Karolinska institutet.
    Del Pozo-Cruz, Borja
    Australian Catholic University, Sydney.
    Nyberg, Gisela
    Karolinska institutet.
    Sanders, Taren
    Australian Catholic University, Sydney.
    Galanti, Maria R
    Karolinska institutet.
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Karolinska institutet.
    Are changes in occupational physical activity level compensated by changes in exercise behavior?2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physically active occupations with high-energy expenditure may lead to lower motivation to exercise during leisure time, while the reverse can be hypothesized for sedentary occupations. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of changing occupational activity level on exercise behavior.

    Methods: Data on occupational physical activity and leisure time exercise were taken from a population-based cohort, with surveys completed in 2010 and 2014. Using data on those employed in both years, two trajectories were analyzed: (i) participants who changed from sedentary to active occupations and (ii) participants who changed from active to sedentary occupations. Exercise was reported in hours per week and changes from 2010 to 2014 were categorized as decreased, increased or stable. Associations were expressed as ORs and 95% CIs adjusting for age, gender and education.

    Results: Data were available for 12 969 participants (57% women, aged 45 ± 9 years, 57% highly educated). Relative to participants whose occupational activity was stable, participants who changed to active occupations (n = 549) were more likely to decrease exercise (OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.02-1.47) and those who changed to sedentary occupations (n = 373) more likely to increase exercise levels (OR = 1.21, 95% CI = 0.97-1.52).

    Conclusion: People changing from sedentary to active occupations compensate by exercising less, and those changing from physically active to sedentary occupations seem to compensate by exercising more in their leisure time. When developing and evaluating interventions to reduce occupational sedentary behavior or to promote exercise, mutual influences on physical activity of different contexts should be considered.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-07-27 12:00
  • 8.
    Nooijen, Carla F J
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institutet.
    Kallings, Lena
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Blom, Victoria
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group. Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekblom, Maria
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control. Karolinska Institutet.
    Common Perceived Barriers and Facilitators for Reducing Sedentary Behaviour among Office Workers.2018In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 15, no 4, article id E792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative studies identified barriers and facilitators associated with work-related sedentary behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine common perceived barriers and facilitators among office workers, assess subgroup differences, and describe sedentary behaviour. From two Swedish companies, 547 office workers (41 years (IQR = 35–48), 65% women, 66% highly educated) completed questionnaires on perceived barriers and facilitators, for which subgroup differences in age, gender, education, and workplace sedentary behaviour were assessed. Sedentary behaviour was measured using inclinometers (n = 311). The most frequently reported barrier was sitting is a habit (67%), which was reported more among women than men (X2 = 5.14, p = 0.03) and more among highly sedentary office workers (X2 = 9.26, p < 0.01). The two other most reported barriers were that standing is uncomfortable (29%) and standing is tiring (24%). Facilitators with the most support were the introduction of either standing- or walking-meetings (respectively 33% and 29%) and more possibilities or reminders for breaks (31%). The proportion spent sedentary was 64% at the workplace, 61% on working days, and 57% on non-working days. This study provides a detailed understanding of office workers’ ideas about sitting and means to reduce sitting. We advise to include the supported facilitators and individualized support in interventions to work towards more effective strategies to reduce sedentary behaviour.

  • 9.
    Nooijen, Carla F J
    et al.
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Möller, Jette
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Forsell, Yvonne
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Ekblom, Maria
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Galanti, Maria R
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Engström, Karin
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Do unfavourable alcohol, smoking, nutrition and physical activity predict sustained leisure time sedentary behaviour? A population-based cohort study.2017In: Preventive Medicine, ISSN 0091-7435, E-ISSN 1096-0260, Vol. 101, p. 23-27, article id S0091-7435(17)30182-2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Comparing lifestyle of people remaining sedentary during longer periods of their life with those favourably changing their behaviour can provide cues to optimize interventions targeting sedentary behaviour. The objective of this study was to determine lifestyle predictors of sustained leisure time sedentary behaviour and assess whether these predictors were dependent on gender, age, socioeconomic position and occupational sedentary behaviour. Data from a large longitudinal population-based cohort of adults (aged 18-97years) in Stockholm responding to public health surveys in 2010 and 2014 were analysed (n=49,133). Leisure time sedentary behaviour was defined as >3h per day of leisure sitting time e.g. watching TV, reading or using tablet. Individuals classified as sedentary at baseline (n=9562) were subsequently categorized as remaining sedentary (n=6357) or reduced sedentary behaviour (n=3205) at follow-up. Lifestyle predictors were unfavourable alcohol consumption, smoking, nutrition, and physical activity. Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding 95% Confidence Intervals (CI) were calculated, adjusting for potential confounders. Unfavourable alcohol consumption (OR=1.22, CI:1.11-1.34), unfavourable candy- or cake consumption (OR=1.15, CI:1.05-1.25), and unfavourable physical activity in different contexts were found to predict sustained sedentary behaviour, with negligible differences according to gender, age, socioeconomic position and occupational sedentary behaviour. People with unfavourable lifestyle profiles regarding alcohol, sweets, or physical activity are more likely to remain sedentary compared to sedentary persons with healthier lifestyle. The impact of combining interventions to reduce leisure time sedentary behaviour with reducing alcohol drinking, sweet consumption and increasing physical activity should be tested as a promising strategy for behavioural modification.

  • 10.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physical Therapy, Rotterdam.
    Post, M. W.
    Spijkerman, D. C.
    Bergen, M. P.
    Stam, H. J.
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    Exercise self-efficacy in persons with spinal cord injury: psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale2013In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 347-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the reliability and validity of the Dutch version of the exercise self-efficacy scale (ESES) in persons with spinal cord injury. This is the first independent study of ESES psychometric properties, and the first report on ESES test-retest reliability. SUBJECTS/PATIENTS: A total of 53 Dutch persons with spinal cord injury. METHODS: Subjects completed the Dutch ESES twice, with 2 weeks between (ESES_1 and ESES_2). Subjects also completed the General self-efficacy scale (GSE), and a questionnaire regarding demographic characteristics and lesion characteristics. Psychometric properties of the Dutch translation of the ESES were assessed and compared with those of the original English-language version. RESULTS: The Dutch ESES was found to have good internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha for ESES_1 = 0.90, ESES_2 = 0.88). Test-retest reliability was adequate (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.81, 95% confidence interval 0.70-0.89). For validity, a moderate, statistically significant correlation was found between ESES and the GSE (Spearman's rho ESES_1 = 0.52, ESES_2 = 0.66, p < 0.01). Furthermore, the psychometric properties of the Dutch ESES were found to be similar to those of the original English version. CONCLUSION: The results of this study support the use of the ESES as a reliable and valid measure of exercise self-efficacy.

  • 11.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center Rotterdam.
    Post, M. W.
    Spooren, A. L.
    Valent, L. J.
    Broeksteeg, R.
    Sluis, T. A.
    Stam, H. J.
    Act-Active Research, Group
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    Exercise self-efficacy and the relation with physical behavior and physical capacity in wheelchair-dependent persons with subacute spinal cord injury2015In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 12, p. 103-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Since physical activity and exercise levels are known to be generally low in persons with spinal cord injury (SCI), there seems to be a need for intervention. Exercise self-efficacy (ESE), the confidence persons have in their ability to be physically active and exercise, is an important and modifiable predictor of physical behavior. The goal of this study was to 1) describe ESE in persons with subacute SCI, 2) to assess ESE in subgroups based on demographic and lesion characteristics, and 3) to explore the relation between ESE and physical behavior and physical capacity. METHODS: Thirthy-seven persons with subacute SCI who are wheelchair dependent participated. Participants completed the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale. We recorded age and lesion characteristics, measured physical behavior (physical activity, motility and sedentary day time, n = 35) with an accelerometer-based activity monitor and measured physical capacity (peak power output, n = 28 and peak oxygen uptake, n = 24) during a maximal hand-cycling test. Measurements were performed 2 months prior to discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. Mann-Whitney tests were used to test for differences between subgroups based on age and lesion characteristics and spearman correlations were used to assess the relation between ESE and physical activity and physical capacity. RESULTS: Persons with tetraplegia had lower ESE compared to persons with paraplegia (Z = -1.93, p = 0.05). No differences in ESE were found between subgroups based on age and motor completeness of the lesion. In persons with paraplegia, ESE was positively related to peak power output (rho = 0.58, p = 0.02). The relation of ESE with wheeled physical activity was rho = 0.36, p = 0.09. CONCLUSIONS: In persons with SCI who are dependent on a manual wheelchair, lesion level when categorized as paraplegic and tetraplegic affected ESE whereas age categories and completeness categories did not. Persons with tetraplegia were found to have lower confidence with regard to physical activity and exercise indicating that this subgroup can benefit from extra attention in the promotion of physical activity and exercise. In persons with paraplegia, ESE seemed to be lower in persons with less peak power output and less daily physical activity.

  • 12.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Research lines MoveFit & Transition and Lifespan Research, Erasmus MC, University Medical Centre, Rotterdam.
    Slaman, J.
    Stam, H. J.
    Roebroeck, M. E.
    Berg-Emons, R. J.
    Learn2Move Research, Group
    Inactive and sedentary lifestyles amongst ambulatory adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy2014In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 11, p. 49-Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: To assess physical behaviour, including physical activity and sedentary behaviour, of ambulatory adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy (CP). We compared participant physical behaviour to that of able-bodied persons and assessed differences related to Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) level and CP distribution (unilateral/bilateral). METHODS: In 48 ambulatory persons aged 16 to 24 years with spastic CP and in 32 able-bodied controls, physical behaviour was objectively determined with an accelerometer-based activity monitor. Total duration, intensity and type of physical activity were assessed and sedentary time was determined (lying and sitting). Furthermore, distribution of walking bouts and sitting bouts was specified. RESULTS: Adolescents and young adults with CP spent 8.6% of 24 hours physically active and 79.5% sedentary, corresponding with respectively 123 minutes and 1147 minutes per 24 hours. Compared to able-bodied controls, persons with CP participated 48 minutes less in physical activities (p < 0.01) and spent 80 minutes more sedentary per 24 hours (p < 0.01). Physical behaviour was not different between persons with GMFCS level I and II and only number of short sitting bouts were significantly more prevalent in persons with bilateral CP compared to unilateral CP (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Ambulatory adolescents and young adults with CP are less physically active and spend more time sedentary compared to able-bodied persons, suggesting that this group may be at increased risk for health problems related to less favourable physical behaviour. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Nederlands trial register: NTR1785.

  • 13.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    Stam, H. J.
    Bergen, M. P.
    Bongers-Janssen, H. M.
    Valent, L.
    van Langeveld, S.
    Twisk, J.
    Act-Active Research, Group
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    A behavioural intervention increases physical activity in people with subacute spinal cord injury: a randomised trial2016In: Journal of Physiotherapy, ISSN 1836-9553, E-ISSN 1836-9561, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 35-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    QUESTIONS: For people with subacute spinal cord injury, does rehabilitation that is reinforced with the addition of a behavioural intervention to promote physical activity lead to a more active lifestyle than rehabilitation alone? DESIGN: Randomised, controlled trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis, and blinded assessors. PARTICIPANTS: Forty-five adults with subacute spinal cord injury who were undergoing inpatient rehabilitation and were dependent on a manual wheelchair. The spinal cord injuries were characterised as: tetraplegia 33%; motor complete 62%; mean time since injury 150 days (SD 74). INTERVENTION: All participants received regular rehabilitation, including handcycle training. Only the experimental group received a behavioural intervention promoting an active lifestyle after discharge. This intervention involved 13 individual sessions delivered by a coach who was trained in motivational interviewing; it began 2 months before and ended 6 months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcome was physical activity, which was objectively measured with an accelerometer-based activity monitor 2 months before discharge, at discharge, and 6 and 12 months after discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. The accelerometry data were analysed as total wheeled physical activity, sedentary time and motility. Self-reported physical activity was a secondary outcome. RESULTS: The behavioural intervention significantly increased wheeled physical activity (overall between-group difference from generalised estimating equation 21minutes per day, 95% CI 8 to 35). This difference was evident 6 months after discharge (28minutes per day, 95% CI 8 to 48) and maintained at 12 months after discharge (25minutes per day, 95% CI 1 to 50). No significant intervention effect was found for sedentary time or motility. Self-reported physical activity also significantly improved. CONCLUSION: The behavioural intervention was effective in eliciting a behavioural change toward a more active lifestyle among people with subacute spinal cord injury. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NTR2424.

  • 14.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    The Miami Project to Cure Paralysis, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL, USA.
    Ter Hoeve, N.
    Field-Fote, E. C.
    Gait quality is improved by locomotor training in individuals with SCI regardless of training approach2009In: Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation, ISSN 1743-0003, E-ISSN 1743-0003, Vol. 6, p. 36-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While various body weight supported locomotor training (BWSLT) approaches are reported in the literature for individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI), none have evaluated outcomes in terms of gait quality. The purpose of this study was to compare changes in measures of gait quality associated with four different BWSLT approaches in individuals with chronic motor-incomplete SCI, and to identify how gait parameters differed from those of non-disabled (ND) individuals. METHODS: Data were analyzed from 51 subjects with SCI who had been randomized into one of four BWSLT groups: treadmill with manual assistance (TM), treadmill with electrical stimulation (TS), overground with electrical stimulation (OG), treadmill with locomotor robot (LR). Subjects with SCI performed a 10-meter kinematic walk test before and after 12 weeks of training. Ten ND subjects performed the test under three conditions: walking at preferred speed, at speed comparable to subjects with SCI, and with a walker at comparable speed. Six kinematic gait quality parameters were calculated including: cadence, step length, stride length, symmetry index, intralimb coordination, and timing of knee extension. RESULTS: In subjects with SCI, all training approaches were associated with improvements in gait quality. After training, subjects with SCI walked at higher cadence and had longer step and stride lengths. No significant differences were found among training groups, however there was an interaction effect indicating that step and stride length improved least in the LR group. Compared to when walking at preferred speed, gait quality of ND subjects was significantly different when walking at speeds comparable to those of the subjects with SCI (both with and without a walker). Post training, gait quality measures of subjects with SCI were more similar to those of ND subjects. CONCLUSION: BWSLT leads to improvements in gait quality (values closer to ND subjects) regardless of training approach. We hypothesize that the smaller changes in the LR group were due to the passive settings used for the robotic device. Compared to walking at preferred speed, gait quality values of ND individuals walking at a slower speed and while using a walker were more similar to those of individuals with SCI.

  • 15.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam, Rotterdam.
    van den Brand, I. L.
    Ter Horst, P.
    Wynants, M.
    Valent, L. J.
    Stam, H. J.
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    Act-Active Research, Group
    Feasibility of Handcycle Training During Inpatient Rehabilitation in Persons With Spinal Cord Injury2015In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 96, no 9, p. 1654-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility of a handcycle training program during inpatient rehabilitation and the changes in physical capacity in persons with subacute spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: Before-after trial. SETTING: Rehabilitation centers. PARTICIPANTS: Persons with subacute SCI in regular rehabilitation (N=45). INTERVENTIONS: A structured handcycle interval training program during the last 8 weeks of inpatient rehabilitation. Training was scheduled 3 times per week (24 sessions total), with an intended frequency of >/=2 times per week. Intended intensity was a Borg score of 4 to 7 on a 10-point scale. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Feasibility was assessed, and participant satisfaction was evaluated (n=30). A maximal handcycling test was performed 8 weeks prior to discharge and at discharge to determine peak power output and peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak) (n=23). RESULTS: Of the participants, 91% completed the handcycle training, and no adverse events were reported. Mean training frequency was 1.8+/-0.5 times per week, and mean Borg score was 6.2+/-1.4. Persons with complete lesions demonstrated lower training feasibility. Most participants were satisfied with the handcycle training. Peak power output and VO2peak improved significantly after the training period (P<.01) by 36.4% and 9.6%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, handcycle training during inpatient rehabilitation in persons with SCI was feasible except for the training frequency. Persons with complete lesions likely need extra attention to benefit optimally from handcycling training. Because the improvements in physical capacity were larger than those known to occur in persons with paraplegia receiving regular rehabilitation, the results suggest that the addition of handcycle training may result in larger increases in physical capacity compared with regular rehabilitation only.

  • 16.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    et al.
    Erasmus MC University Medical Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Rotterdam.
    Vogels, S.
    Bongers-Janssen, H. M.
    Bergen, M. P.
    Stam, H. J.
    van den Berg-Emons, H. J.
    Act-Active Research, Group
    Fatigue in persons with subacute spinal cord injury who are dependent on a manual wheelchair2015In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 53, no 10, p. 758-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence and severity of fatigue in persons with subacute spinal cord injury (SCI), assess whether demographic and lesion characteristics are related to fatigue and determine the relationship with physical fitness and physical behavior. SETTING: Measurements were performed 2 months before discharge from inpatient rehabilitation. METHODS: Thirty-six persons with subacute SCI, dependent on a manual wheelchair, mean age 43+/-15 and 83% men, completed the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS). FSS scores >4 indicated fatigue. We recorded age and lesion characteristics, measured body mass index, measured peak power output and peak oxygen uptake during a maximal handcycling test and determined physical behavior using an accelerometer-based activity monitor. T-tests were used to test for differences in fatigue between subgroups based on age and lesion characteristics, and regression analyses to assess the relationship with physical fitness and physical behavior. RESULTS: Mean FSS was 3.3+/-1.3. Fatigue, including severe fatigue, was prevalent in 31% (95% confidence interval: 16-46) of participants compared with 18% in the general population. Furthermore, mean fatigue was significantly higher in persons with incomplete compared with complete lesions (t=2.22, P=0.03). Mean scores between other subgroups did not differ significantly. Of the physical fitness and physical behavior measures, only peak oxygen uptake tended to be related to more fatigue (B=-1.47, P=0.05). CONCLUSION: Fatigue was prevalent and is of concern in persons with subacute SCI. Those with incomplete lesions seem to be at higher risk. Because fatigue is known to persist among persons with SCI, interventions to reduce fatigue seem necessary.

  • 17.
    Nooijen, Carla
    et al.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physical Therapy, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    Slaman, J.
    van der Slot, W.
    Stam, H.
    Roebroeck, M.
    van den Berg-Emons, R.
    Learn2Move Research, Group
    Health-related physical fitness of ambulatory adolescents and young adults with spastic cerebral palsy2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 7, p. 642-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe in detail the health-related physical fitness of adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy, compared with able-bodied references, and to assess differences related to Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) level and distribution of cerebral palsy. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SUBJECTS: Fifty ambulatory persons with spastic cerebral palsy, GMFCS level I or II, aged 16-24 years. METHODS: Physical fitness measures were: (i) cardiopulmonary fitness by maximal cycle ergometry, (ii) muscle strength, (iii) body mass index and waist circumference, (iv) skin-folds, and (v) lipid profile. RESULTS: Regression analyses, corrected for age and gender, showed that persons with bilateral cerebral palsy had lower cardiopulmonary fitness and lower hip abduction muscle strength than those with unilateral cerebral palsy. Comparisons between persons with GMFCS levels I and II showed a difference only in peak power during cycle ergometry. Cardiopulmonary fitness, hip flexion and knee extension strength were considerably lower (< 75%) in persons with cerebral palsy than reference values. CONCLUSION: The distribution of cerebral palsy affects fitness more than GMFCS level does. Furthermore, adolescents and young adults with cerebral palsy have reduced health-related physical fitness compared with able-bodied persons. This stage of life has a strong influence on adult lifestyle, thus it is an important period for intervention.

  • 18. Post, M. W.
    et al.
    Nooijen, Carla
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center Rotterdam.
    Postma, K.
    Dekkers, J.
    Penninx, F.
    van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    Stam, H. J.
    People with Spinal Cord Injury in the Netherlands2017In: American Journal of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, ISSN 0894-9115, E-ISSN 1537-7385, Vol. 96, no 2 Suppl 1, p. S93-S95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    et al.
    L'Ortye, A. A.
    Buffart, L. M.
    Nieuwenhuijsen, C.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine and Physical Therapy, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    Bergen, M. P.
    Stam, H. J.
    Bussmann, J. B.
    Validation of the Physical Activity Scale for individuals with physical disabilities2011In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 92, no 6, p. 923-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the criterion validity of the Physical Activity Scale for Individuals With Physical Disabilities (PASIPD) by means of daily physical activity levels measured by using a validated accelerometry-based activity monitor in a large group of persons with a physical disability. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. SETTING: Participants' home environment. PARTICIPANTS: Ambulatory and nonambulatory persons with cerebral palsy, meningomyelocele, or spinal cord injury (N=124). INTERVENTIONS: Not applicable. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Self-reported physical activity level measured by using the PASIPD, a 2-day recall questionnaire, was correlated to objectively measured physical activity level measured by using a validated accelerometry-based activity monitor. RESULTS: Significant Spearman correlation coefficients between the PASIPD and activity monitor outcome measures ranged from .22 to .37. The PASIPD overestimated the duration of physical activity measured by using the activity monitor (mean +/- SD, 3.9+/-2.9 vs 1.5+/-0.9h/d; P<.01). Significant correlation (rho=-.74; P<.01) was found between average number of hours of physical activity per day measured by using the 2 methods and difference in hours between methods. This indicates larger overestimation for persons with higher activity levels. CONCLUSIONS: The PASIPD correlated poorly with objective measurements using an accelerometry-based activity monitor in people with a physical disability. However, similar low correlations between objective and subjective activity measurements have been found in the general population. Users of the PASIPD should be cautious about overestimating physical activity levels.

  • 20. van den Berg-Emons, R. J.
    et al.
    van Ginneken, B. T.
    Nooijen, Carla F.
    Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam.
    Metselaar, H. J.
    Tilanus, H. W.
    Kazemier, G.
    Stam, H. J.
    Fatigue after liver transplantation: effects of a rehabilitation program including exercise training and physical activity counseling2014In: Physical Therapy, ISSN 0031-9023, E-ISSN 1538-6724, Vol. 94, no 6, p. 857-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: It is hypothesized that increasing physical fitness and daily physical activity can lead to a reduction in fatigue. However, standard medical care following liver transplantation seldom includes rehabilitation that focuses on physical fitness and physical activity. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore whether a rehabilitation program can reduce fatigue in recipients of liver transplants. Furthermore, effects on physical fitness, physical activity, and cardiovascular risk were studied, and adherence, satisfaction, and adverse events were assessed. DESIGN: This was an uncontrolled intervention study. SETTING: The study took place in an outpatient rehabilitation clinic. PATIENTS: Eighteen recipients of a liver transplant who were fatigued participated in a 12-week rehabilitation program including physical exercise training and counseling on physical activity. The primary outcome measure was fatigue. Other outcome measures were: aerobic capacity, muscle strength, body fat, daily physical activity, lipid profile, and glycemic control. All measurements were performed before and after the rehabilitation program. Adherence, satisfaction, and adverse events were registered. RESULTS: After the program, participants were significantly less fatigued, and the percentage of individuals with severe fatigue was 22% to 53% lower than before the program. In addition, aerobic capacity and knee flexion strength were significantly higher, and body fat was significantly lower after the program. Participants were able to perform physical exercise at the target training intensity, no adverse events were registered, and attendance (93%) and mean patient satisfaction (8.5 out of 10, range=7-10) were high. LIMITATIONS: No control group was used in the study. CONCLUSIONS: A rehabilitation program consisting of exercise training and physical activity counseling is well tolerated and seems promising in reducing fatigue and improving fitness among recipients of liver transplants.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf