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  • 1.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Bedömningsstöd i ämnet Idrott och hälsa: gymnasiet2014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 2.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Thedin Jacobsson, Britta
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Bedömningsstöd i idrott och hälsa: årskurs 7-92012Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Kraepelien Strid, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Predictors of adolescent fitness levels among Swedish adolescents, a longitudinal study2012In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, p. S185-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: It has been consistently demonstrated that low aerobic fitness is causally linked to increased cardio-metabolic risk. Aerobic fitness has also been causally related to cognitive function. From adolescence and onwards, the inter-individual stability ("tracking") in fitness is fairly high. An individual's fitness level in adolescence is therefore a central determinant for future health. However, childhood predictors of adolescent fitness levels are largely unknown. The present study aimed at identifying personal, school-specific and structural determinants in childhood (age 10 yrs) for adolescent aerobic fitness (at age 16 yrs).

    Methods: Body mass index-based overweight status (normal weight vs overweight/obese, according to Cole et al.) and gross motor skills (based on the Tidén-Nyberg test) were measured at baseline in 209 Swedish children (mean [SD] age 9.8 [0.60] yrs) from randomly selected schools on Sweden. Immigration status (self-report) and average household income in quartiles on community level (register obtained) were used as possible structural confounders. Data on educational status of the PE teacher and lesson structure (gender-separated vs mixed classes) was obtained from the PE teacher. At the reexamination (at age 15.8 [0.33] yrs), aerobic fitness was estimated using the Åstrand-Ryhming nomogram. Low aerobic fitness was defined as below the first quartile (29.7 mL x min-1 x kg-1). Risk for low aerobic fitness was assessed using logistic regression

    Results: Risk for low aerobic fitness at follow-up was lower in children who were normal weight (OR: 0.23.95% CI: 0.10 to 0.49) and in children with trained PE-teachers (OR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.93), but higher among children with poor gross motor skills (OR:1.84, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.13) at baseline. Gender, immigration history, neighborhood economical status and lesson structure were all non-significant predictors of low adolescent fitness.

    Discussion: The results stress the importance for early overweight prevention and treatment and for professional identification and treatment of children with impaired gross motor skills at young ages. In Sweden, a lagre proportion of PE-teachers in lower grades lack formal PE-teacher education, which according to the present study poses a threat to children's future health. Early screening and treatment of children with limited motor proficiencies seems may help children adapting a physically active lifestyle and avoiding low fitness levels in adolescence and young adulthood.

  • 4.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Kraepelien Strid, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Sundblad, Gunilla Brun
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Predictors of perceived competence in physical activities (PCPA) among Swedish adolescents, a longitudinal study2012In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, p. S113-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: An individual's perceived competence in physical activities (PCPA) has been proven a powerful predictor for future physical activity. However, the perception of one¥s competence may differ over time, especially during childhood and adolescence but also between types of physical activities or tasks. Further, the predictors for PCPA are largely unknown, but overweight status and gross motor skills have been proposed as candidates. We sought to identify predictors for general PCPA in Swedish adolescents, and PCPA in three highly prevalent forms of physical activities in Swedish physical education (PE), namely swimming, aerobics and soccer.

    Methods: Body mass index-based overweight status (normal weight vs overweight/obese, according to Cole et al.) and gross motor skills (based on the TidÈn-Nyberg test) were measured in 352 Swedish children (160 girls and 192 boys) at baseline (age 10). Immigration status (self-report) and average community household income level (quartiles, register obtained) at 10 yrs were used as possible socio-cultural confounders. Data on educational status of the PE teacher responsible for education at age 10 yrs was obtained by self-report from the teachers. Self reported data on general PCPA and PCPA in soccer, swimming and aerobics at 16 yrs was obtained at follow-up and predictors for PCPA was identified using logistic regression.

    Results: Being overweight or obese (OR: 2.27, 95% CI: 1.18–4.38) and attending PE classes with unqualified teachers (OR: 2.41, 95% CI: 1.36–4.27) at age 10 yrs were both risk factors for low general PCPA a age 16 yrs. Concerning the selected activities, being overweight or obese at age 10 yrs predicted low PCPA in swimming (OR: 2.67, 95% CI:1.31–5.46) but not in the other activities at age 16 yrs. Poor gross motor skills at age 10 yrs predicted low PCPA at 16 yrs only in soccer (OR:1.48, 95% CI: 1.02–2.13). Female gender (OR: 0.21, 95% CI: 0.13–0.38), and higher socioeconomic status (OR: 0.71 per quartile, 95% CI: 0.55–0.92)at age 10 yrs were both found to be associated to lower risk for low PCPA in aerobics.

    Discussion: Overweight status and educational status of the PE teacher both affect the risk of having low general PCPA. The effect of gender, overweight status, gross motor skill and socio-economy seem to differ between specific activities, indicating that PCPA may be task specific in adolescents. These results may serve as background when planning physical activity interventions. Further, they stress the need for professional PE teachers to teach in younger classes.

  • 5.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Tiden, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Thedin Jakobsson, Britta
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Bedömningsstöd idrott och hälsa årskurs 4-62014Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Som stöd för bedömning i idrott och hälsa i årskurs 6 finns ett material som ger tydliga exempel på bedömningar av de kunskaper som eleverna visar upp utifrån kunskapskraven. Bedömningsstödet syftar till att konkretisera delar av kunskapskraven genom elevexempel och lärares samtal kring bedömning.

  • 6.
    Meckbach, Jane
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Frykman Järlefelt, Margareta
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Hägglöf, Caroline
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Söderström (Lundvall), Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Wedin, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Att lära sig dansa - eller - att lära sig en dans1999Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7.
    Meckbach, Jane
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Söderström (Lundvall), Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Frykman Järlefeldt, Margareta
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Hägglöf, Caroline
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Wedin, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Börja Dansa: Idrotteket nr 92001Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Nyberg, Marie
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Sterner, Tage
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Gymnastik som redskap2012In: Idrottsdidaktiska utmaningar / [ed] Larsson, H. & Meckbach, J, Stockholm, Stockholm: Liber, 2012, 2, p. 87-102Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Nyberg, Marie
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Alltsidig rörelseförmåga - ett kroppsligt abc2012In: Idrottsdidaktiska utmaningar / [ed] Larsson, H. & Meckbach, J, Stockholm, Stockholm: Liber, 2012, 2, p. 70-86Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Nyberg, Marie
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Att kunna – en förutsättning för att vilja?!2004In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, no 4, p. 57-60Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Har barns möjligheter att träna och befästa motoriska grundformer minskat i skolan och på fritiden? Det kan man fråga sig då resultaten från SIH-projektets motorikstudie analyseras. Många barn och ungdomar brister i sin motoriska förmåga. Exempelvis kan 40% av eleverna i år sex inte utföra motoriska grundformer såsom att balansera, kasta, stödja och rulla på ett tillfredsställande sätt.

  • 11.
    Tidén, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Development and Initial Validation of the NyTid Test: A Movement Assessment Tool for Compulsory School Pupils.2015In: Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, ISSN 1091-367X, E-ISSN 1532-7841, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 34-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study presents the development process and initial validation of the NyTid test, a process-oriented movement assessment tool for compulsory school pupils. A sample of 1,260 (627 girls and 633 boys; mean age of 14.39) Swedish school children participated in the study. In the first step, exploratory factor analyses (EFAs) were performed in Sample 1, consisting of one third of the participants. The EFA indicated that the 17 skills in the test could be reduced to 12 and divided into four factors. In the second step, the suggested factor structure was cross-validated with confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) in the larger Sample 2. The NyTid test adopts a holistic perspective in which qualitative criteria offer an alternative approach to product-oriented measurement. The study confirms that the NyTid test is a valid process-oriented assessment tool designed for typically developed children aged 12 and 16. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR

  • 12.
    Tidén, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Development of movement skills among Swedish children and adolescents – a longitudinal study2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Development of movement skills among Swedish children and adolescents – a longitudinal study

    Anna Tidén, Marie Nyberg

    The Swedish School of Sport and health sciences

    To develop a broad repertoire of gross motor skill in the early school years seams important. Children’s movements and play contributes to both social and physical development. To develop and to master a wide range of movements skills seams also contribute to better self-esteem and a higher physical self worth. The gross motor skills and coordinative skills are also a solid ground for sports and other physical and health activities.

    The Swedish curriculum for PE stipulates that the students should master the gross motor skills in the 5th school year.

    The motor skill study is a part of a Swedish multi-disciplinary project called School- Sport-Health and started in 2001 and data has been gathered 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010. The aim of motor skill study in 2001 was to investigate how students in the age of 10, 13 and 16 managed in 16 different motor skills such as skipping, jumping, crawling, rolling, balancing, bouncing, throwing and catching a ball and also combination of these skills.

    The results have been analyzed using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) and results from 2001 indicate that 29% of the pupils in the 6th school year are not able to manage the gross motor skill tests without remarks. The pupils with the lowest scores can be found among young female children with low strength and overweight. The test also shows that in the 9th school year boys are stronger than girls. Boys and girls in the lower ages (school year 3 and 6) are more similar in the gross motor skills profile but not on the single movement level. It can also be noted that girls are better in skipping and some of the movements of more gymnastic character whereas boys are better in throwing balls and beanbags. Boys and girls have nearly identical results in the test of balance, walking on a balance beam where gender or age does not seem to have any affect. In the following up study of the 10 year old students in 2007 the results shows that if a student mastered the motor skills in 2001 they also did it six years later (there where only 10% risk to lower the score). The scores do also correlate with the student’s strength, the stronger they are the higher scores on the skills test. Among the students who had a high BMI in 2001 only 20% had developed their motor skills to a sufficient level.

    The study is ongoing and during 2010 the participants from 2001 and 2007 have answered a questionnaire relating to social background, physical education, sports and leisure time activities and perceived health. The incoming results from the questionnaires will be discussed in relation to the motor skills results in a socio-cultural perspective.

  • 13.
    Tidén, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Nyberg, Marie
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Screening of gross motor skills among Swedish children and adolescents2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Screening of gross motor skills among Swedish children and adolescents

    Anna Tidén, Marie Nyberg

    Stockholm University College of Physical Education and Sports, Sweden

    Physical Education (PE) teachers in Sweden have noticed that pupils are getting worse in their ability to manage gross motor skills. The gross motor skills and coordinative skills are the solid ground for sports and other health activities. If not developing their gross motor skill children tends to avoid taking part in games and sports. The benefits of sports and outdoor activities such as social and health benefits can therefore be missed. The aim of the study was to investigate 2000 pupils in school year 3, 6 and 9 concerning their: physical and health status, the level of physical activity and conception of the subject “PE and health”. The selection of pupils was based on randomly chosen schools and classes from Sweden. The aim of  the motor skills test, was to make a survey of what Swedish pupils can manage in gross motor skills today. Based upon these results we can in the future tell whether the pupils are maintaining today’s level of gross motor skills or not. The Swedish curriculum for “sports and health” states that pupils should manage gross motor skills in the 5th year of school. Can they manage to do that?

    The study started with the construction of the gross motor and coordinative skill tests. The movements selected for the test were based on gross motor skills, coordinative skills and combinations of these skills. The test included 16 movements measured on a scale from 1 to 4. The levels of the scale have a written description to support the ocular observations. The highest score to achieve was 64 and the lowest was 16. Examples of skills tested were; skipping, jumping, crawling, rolling, being upside down, bouncing and throwing balls. The results are analyzed both on an aggregated level here referred to as gross motor skills profile, as well as on a single movement level. The results indicate that 29% of the pupils in the 6th school year are not able to manage the gross motor skill tests without remarks. The pupils with the lowest scores can be found among young female children with low strength and overweight. The test also shows that in the 9th school year boys are stronger than girls. Boys and girls in the lower ages (school year 3 and 6) are more similar in the gross motor skills profile but not on the single movement level. It can also be noted that girls are better in skipping and some of the movements of more gymnastic character whereas boys are better in throwing balls and beanbags. Boys and girls have nearly identical results in the test of balance, walking on a balance beam where gender or age does not seem to have any affect.

    From the main findings of the tests we can observe that the younger pupils have not yet developed the gross motor skills. It is also noticeable that many of the pupils in the 6th school year are achieving poor results in the tests even though the Swedish curriculum for “sports and health” states that the pupils should have achieved these skills already in the 5th school year. Many of the girls in the 9th school year are very poor in the movements that included some strength ability. This weakness is important for PE teachers to pay attention to, at an early stage of the girl’s physical development when girls do not develop the same strength as boys during their puberty.

    If children do not have the gross motor skill and some strength it is more likely that they will choose other activities or have other interest then physical activities and sports on their leisure time. This may in the future give them health problems because we know from fact that physical inactivity is one of the main causes to bad health.

1 - 13 of 13
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