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  • 1. Alvehus, Malin
    et al.
    Boman, Niklas
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Svensson, Michael B
    Burén, Jonas
    Metabolic adaptations in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and whole-body oxidative capacity in response to resistance training.2014In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 114, no 7, p. 1463-1471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The effects of resistance training on mitochondrial biogenesis and oxidative capacity in skeletal muscle are not fully characterized, and even less is known about alterations in adipose tissue. We aimed to investigate adaptations in oxidative metabolism in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue after 8 weeks of heavy resistance training in apparently healthy young men.

    METHODS: Expression of genes linked to oxidative metabolism in the skeletal muscle and adipose tissue was assessed before and after the training program. Body composition, peak oxygen uptake (VO2 peak), fat oxidation, activity of mitochondrial enzyme in muscle, and serum adiponectin levels were also determined before and after resistance training.

    RESULTS: In muscle, the expression of the genes AdipoR1 and COX4 increased after resistance training (9 and 13 %, respectively), whereas the expression levels of the genes PGC-1α, SIRT1, TFAM, CPT1b, and FNDC5 did not change. In adipose tissue, the expression of the genes SIRT1 and CPT1b decreased after training (20 and 23 %, respectively). There was an increase in lean mass (from 59.7 ± 6.1 to 61.9 ± 6.2 kg), VO2 peak (from 49.7 ± 5.5 to 56.3 ± 5.0 ml/kg/min), and fat oxidation (from 6.8 ± 2.1 to 9.1 ± 2.7 mg/kg fat-free mass/min) after training, whereas serum adiponectin levels decreased significantly and enzyme activity of citrate synthase and 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase did not change.

    CONCLUSION: Despite significant increases in VO2 peak, fat oxidation, and lean mass following resistance training, the total effect on gene expression and enzyme activity linked to oxidative metabolism was moderate.

  • 2. Balsom, Paul D
    et al.
    Gaitanos, G C
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    High-intensity exercise and muscle glycogen availability in humans.1999In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 165, no 4, p. 337-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated the effects of muscle glycogen availability on performance and selected physiological and metabolic responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Seven male subjects completed a regimen of exercise and dietary intake (48 h) to either lower and keep low (LOW-CHO) or lower and then increase (HIGH-CHO) muscle glycogen stores, on two separate occasions at least a week apart. On each occasion the subjects completed a short-term (<10 min) and prolonged (>30 min) intermittent exercise (IEX) protocol, 24 h apart, which consisted of 6-s bouts of high-intensity exercise performed at 30-s intervals on a cycle ergometer. Glycogen concentration (mean +/- SEM) in m. vastus lateralis before both IEx(short) and IEx(long) was significantly lower following LOW-CHO [180 (14), 181 (17) mmol kg (dw)(-1)] compared with HIGH-CHO [397 (35), 540 (25) mmol kg (dw)(-1)]. In both IEx(short) and IEx(long), significantly less work was performed following LOW-CHO compared with HIGH-CHO. In IEx(long), the number of exercise bouts that could be completed at a pre-determined target exercise intensity increased by 265% from 111 (14) following LOW-CHO to 294 (29) following HIGH-CHO (P < 0.05). At the point of fatigue in IEx(long), glycogen concentration was significantly lower with the LOW-CHO compared with HIGH-CHO [58 (25) vs. 181 (46) mmol kg (dw)(-1), respectively]. The plasma concentrations of adrenaline and nor-adrenaline (in IEx(short) and IEx(long)), and FFAand glycerol (in IEx(long)), increased several-fold above resting values with both experimental conditions. Oxygen uptake during the exercise periods in IEx(long), approached 70% of Vo2max. These results suggest that muscle glycogen availability can affect performance during both short-term and more prolonged high-intensity intermittent exercise and that with repeated exercise periods as short as 6 s, there can be a relatively high aerobic contribution.

  • 3.
    Carlström, P.A.
    et al.
    Idrottsmedicin Umeå Universitet.
    Boman, N
    Idrottsmedicin Umeå Universitet.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Isaksson, A
    Idrottsmedicin umeå Universitet.
    Johansson, J
    Idrottsmedicin Umeå universitet.
    Burén, J
    Idrottsmedicin Umeå Universitet.
    Svensson, M.B.
    Idrottsmedicin Umeå Universitet.
    Adaptations in peak oxygen consumption and fat oxidation following hypertrophy-induced heavy resistance training2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Edman, Sebastian
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Anabolic signalling in individual muscle fibres following resistance exercise in combination with amino acid intake: PO-2602018In: Exercise Biochemistry Review: Vol 1 No 5 (2018): Proceedings of IBEC 2018, Beijing, China (PO-201 -> PO-308), 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective Human muscle consists of a mixture of fibres with different contractile and metabolic properties, type I (slow-twitch) and type II (fast-twitch) fibres. Little is known about the effect of anabolic stimuli, in particular nutrition, on the molecular response in the different fibre types. Here, we examine the effect of resistance exercise and essential amino acid (EAA) supplementation on mTOR signalling in individual type I and type II human muscle fibres.

    Methods Five strength-trained male subjects performed two sessions of leg press exercise (10 x 10 repetition at 62-85 % of 1RM). During exercise and recovery, the subjects ingested an aqueous solution with EAA (290 mg/kg) or flavoured water (placebo). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 90 min after exercise. The biopsies were freeze-dried and single fibres dissected out and weighed (range 0.9 – 8 ug). The fibres were individually homogenized and analysed for proteins in the mTOR pathway using Western blot. Membranes were repeatedly stripped and fibres were identified as type I or type II following incubation with antibodies against the different myosin isoforms.

    Results Exercise led to a significant increase in mTOR and p70S6k1 phosphorylation and a fall in eEF2 phosphorylation, similar in both fibre types. There was a large variation between individual fibres; some fibres were highly activated whereas others were not activated at all despite the heavy exercise performed. Intake of EAA caused a 2- to 6-fold higher increase in mTOR and p70S6k1 phosphorylation in both type I and type II fibres as compared to intake of placebo, with no difference between the fibre types. The phosphorylation of eEF2 was not affected by intake of EAA. The total expression of p70S6k1 and eEF2 was 145% and 155% higher in type II than in type I fibres (P<0.05), respectively, whereas no difference between the fibre types was observed for mTOR protein.

    Conclusions The response to heavy resistance exercise regarding mTOR signalling was similar in type I and type II fibres in trained subjects, but with a large variation between single fibres of both types. Furthermore, ingestion of EAA enhanced the effect of resistance exercise on phosphorylation of mTOR and p70S6k1 in both fibre types.

  • 5.
    Edman, Sebastian
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Moberg, Marcus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Apro, William
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    mTORC1 Signaling in Individual Human Muscle Fibers Following Resistance Exercise in Combination With Intake of Essential Amino Acids2019In: Frontiers in nutrition, ISSN 2296-861X, Vol. 6, article id 96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human muscles contain a mixture of type I and type II fibers with different contractile and metabolic properties. Little is presently known about the effect of anabolic stimuli, in particular nutrition, on the molecular responses of these different fiber types. Here, we examine the effect of resistance exercise in combination with intake of essential amino acids (EAA) on mTORC1 signaling in individual type I and type II human muscle fibers. Five strength-trained men performed two sessions of heavy leg press exercise. During exercise and recovery, the subjects ingested an aqueous solution of EAA (290 mg/kg) or flavored water (placebo). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 90 min after exercise. The biopsies were freeze-dried and single fibers dissected out and weighed (range 0.95-8.1 mu g). The fibers were homogenized individually and identified as type I or II by incubation with antibodies against the different isoforms of myosin. They were also analyzed for both the levels of protein as well as phosphorylation of proteins in the mTORC1 pathway using Western blotting. The levels of the S6K1 and eEF2 proteins were similar to 50% higher in type II than in type I fibers (P < 0.05), but no difference was found between fiber types with respect to the level of mTOR protein. Resistance exercise led to non-significant increases (2-3-fold) in mTOR and S6K1 phosphorylation as well as a 50% decrease (P < 0.05) in eEF2 phosphorylation in both fiber types. Intake of EAA caused a 2 and 6-fold higher (P < 0.05) elevation of mTOR and S6K1 phosphorylation, respectively, in both type I and type II fibers compared to placebo, with no effect on phosphorylation of eEF2. In conclusion, protein levels of S6K1 and eEF2 were significantly higher in type II than type I fibers suggesting higher capacity of the mTOR pathway in type II fibers. Ingestion of EAA enhanced the effect of resistance exercise on phosphorylation of mTOR and S6K1 in both fiber types, but with considerable variation between single fibers of both types.

  • 6.
    Faager, Gun
    et al.
    Medicin/Thoraxsektionen, sjukgymnastikkliniken Karolinska universitetssjukhuset Solna.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Sköld, Carl Magnus
    Rundgren, Siw
    Tollbäck, Anna
    Jakobsson, Per
    Creatine supplementation and physical training in patients with COPD: a double blind, placebo-controlled study.2006In: International journal of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ISSN 1176-9106, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 445-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY OBJECTIVES: Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have low exercise capacity and low content of high energetic phosphates in their skeletal muscles. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether creatine supplementation together with exercise training may increase physical performance compared with exercise training in patients with COPD. DESIGN: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, 23 patients with COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] < 70% of predicted) were randomized to oral creatine (n = 13) or placebo (n = 10) supplementation during an 8-week rehabilitation programme including exercise training. Physical performance was assessed by Endurance Shuttle Walking Test (ESWT), dyspnea and leg fatigue with Borg CR- 10, quality of life with St George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). In addition, lung function test, artery blood gases, grip strength test, muscle strength and fatigue in knee extensors were measured. RESULTS: COPD patients receiving creatine supplementation increased their average walking time by 61% (ESWT) (p < 0.05) after the training period compared with 48% (p = 0.07) in the placebo group. Rated dyspnea directly after the ESWT decreased significantly from 7 to 5 (p < 0.05) in the creatine group. However, the difference between the groups was not statistically significant neither in walking time nor in rated dyspnea. Creatine supplementation did not increase the health related quality of life, lung function, artery blood gases, grip strength and knee extensor strength/fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Oral creatine supplementation in combination with exercise training showed no significant improvement in physical performance, measured as ESWT, in patients with COPD compared with exercise training alone.

  • 7.
    Gray, Stuart R
    et al.
    Strathclyde inst of pharmacy and biomedical sciences, university of strathclyde, Glasgow UK.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ferguson, Richard A
    ATP and phosphocreatine utilization in single human muscle fibres during the development of maximal power output at elevated muscle temperatures.2008In: Journal of Sports Sciences, ISSN 0264-0414, E-ISSN 1466-447X, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 701-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, we examined the effect of muscle temperature (Tm) on adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and phosphocreatine utilization in single muscle fibres during the development of maximal power output in humans. Six male participants performed a 6-s maximal sprint on a friction-braked cycle ergometer under both normal (Tm = 34.3 degrees C, s = 0.6) and elevated (T(m) = 37.3 degrees C, s = 0.2) muscle temperature conditions. During the elevated condition, muscle temperature of the legs was raised, passively, by hot water immersion followed by wrapping in electrically heated blankets. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and immediately after exercise. Freeze-dried single fibres were dissected, characterized according to myosin heavy chain composition, and analysed for ATP and phosphocreatine content. Single fibres were classified as: type I, IIA, IIAX25 (1 - 25% IIX isoform), IIAX50 (26 - 50% IIX), IIAX75 (51 - 75% IIX), or IIAX100 (76 - 100% IIX). Maximal power output and pedal rate were both greater (P < 0.05) during the elevated condition by 258 W (s = 110) and 22 rev . min(-1) (s = 6), respectively. In both conditions, phosphocreatine content decreased significantly in all fibre types, with a greater decrease during the elevated condition in type IIA fibres (P < 0.01). Adenosine triphosphate content was also reduced to a greater (P < 0.01) extent in type IIA fibres during the elevated condition. The results of the present study indicate that after passive elevation of muscle temperature, there was a greater decrease in ATP and phosphocreatine content in type IIA fibres than in the normal trial, which contributed to the higher maximal power output.

  • 8.
    Gray, Stuart R
    et al.
    Institute of medical sciences, University of Aberdeen, Skottland.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Watson, Moira
    Ferguson, Richard A
    Skeletal muscle ATP turnover and single fibre ATP and PCr content during intense exercise at different muscle temperatures in humans.2011In: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0031-6768, E-ISSN 1432-2013, Vol. 462, no 6, p. 885-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of temperature on skeletal muscle ATP turnover, pulmonary oxygen uptake and single fibre ATP and PCr content was studied during intense cycling exercise. Six healthy male subjects performed 6-min intense (Δ50%LT-VO(2peak)) cycling, at 60 rpm, under conditions of normal (N) and elevated muscle temperature (ET). Muscle biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis at rest, 2 and 6 min were analysed for homogenate ATP, PCr, lactate and glycogen, allowing estimation of anaerobic ATP turnover. Freeze-dried single fibres from biopsies were characterised according to their myosin heavy chain composition (type I, IIA or IIAX) and analysed for ATP and PCr content. Pulmonary gas exchange was measured throughout. There was no difference in pulmonary oxygen uptake between the trials. The elevation of muscle temperature resulted in a lower (P < 0.05) PCr content, higher (P < 0.05) lactate content and greater (P < 0.05) anaerobic ATP turnover after 2 min of exercise. There was no effect of temperature on these measures at 6 min. In single fibres it was observed that in ET, there was a lower (P < 0.05) PCr content in type I fibres after 2 min with no differences between conditions after 6 min. The present study demonstrates that elevation of muscle temperature results in a greater anaerobic ATP turnover and type I fibre PCr degradation during the initial 2 min of intense exercise.

  • 9. Kalsen, Anders
    et al.
    Hostrup, Morten
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Karlsson, Sebastian
    Backer, Vibeke
    Bangsbo, Jens
    Inhaled Beta2-agonist Increases Power Output and Glycolysis during Sprinting in Men.2016In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 39-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of the beta2-agonist terbutaline (TER) on power output and muscle metabolism during maximal sprint cycling.

    METHODS: In a randomized double-blind crossover design, nine moderately trained men (VO2max: 4.6±0.2 L[BULLET OPERATOR]min) conducted a 10-s cycle sprint after inhalation of either 15 mg TER or placebo (PLA). A muscle biopsy was collected before and <10 s after the sprint, and analyzed for metabolites.

    RESULTS: Mean and peak power during the sprint were 8.3±1.1 and 7.8±2.5 % higher (P<0.05) in TER than in PLA, respectively. Moreover, net rate of glycogenolysis (6.5±0.8 vs. 3.1±0.7 mmol glucosyl units kg dw s) and glycolysis (2.4±0.2 vs. 1.6±0.2 mmol glucosyl units kg dw s) were higher (P<0.05) in TER than in PLA. After the sprint, ATP was reduced in PLA (P<0.05), but not in TER. During the sprint, there was no difference in breakdown of phosphocreatine (PCr) between treatments. Estimated anaerobic ATP utilization was 9.2 ±4.0 % higher (P<0.05) in TER than in PLA. After the sprint, ATP was lowered (P <0.05) by 25.7±7.3 % in type II fibers in PLA with no reduction in TER. Before the sprint, PCr was 24.5±7.2 % lower (P <0.05) in type II fibers in TER than in PLA. In PLA, breakdown of PCr was 50.2±24.8 % higher (P <0.05) in type II than in type I fibers with no difference in TER.

    CONCLUSION: The present study shows that a terbutaline-induced increase in power output is associated with increased rates of glycogenolysis and glycolysis in skeletal muscles. Furthermore, as terbutaline counteracted a reduction in ATP in type II fibers, terbutaline may postpone fatigue development in these fibers.

  • 10.
    Krustrup, Peter
    et al.
    Inst of exercise and sport sciences dept of human physiology, August Krogh inst, University of Copenhagen .
    Secher, Niels H
    Relu, Mihai U
    Hellsten, Ylva
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Bangsbo, Jens
    Neuromuscular blockade of slow twitch muscle fibres elevates muscle oxygen uptake and energy turnover during submaximal exercise in humans.2008In: Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0022-3751, E-ISSN 1469-7793, Vol. 586, no Pt 24, p. 6037-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the hypothesis that a greater activation of fast-twitch (FT) fibres during dynamic exercise leads to a higher muscle oxygen uptake (VO2 ) and energy turnover as well as a slower muscle on-kinetics. Subjects performed one-legged knee-extensor exercise for 10 min at an intensity of 30 W without (CON) and with (CUR) arterial injections of the non-depolarizing neuromuscular blocking agent cisatracurium. In CUR, creatine phosphate (CP) was unaltered in slow twitch (ST) fibres and decreased (P < 0.05) by 28% in FT fibres, whereas in CON, CP decreased (P < 0.05) by 33% and 23% in ST and FT fibres, respectively. From 127 s of exercise, muscle VO2 was higher (P < 0.05) in CUR compared to CON (425 +/- 25 (+/- S.E.M.) versus 332 +/- 30 ml min(-1)) and remained higher (P < 0.05) throughout exercise. Using monoexponential fitting, the time constant of the exercise-induced muscle VO2 response was slower (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (55 +/- 6 versus 33 +/- 5 s). During CUR and CON, muscle homogenate CP was lowered (P < 0.05) by 32 and 35%, respectively, and also muscle lactate production was similar in CUR and CON (37.8 +/- 4.1 versus 35.2 +/- 6.2 mmol). Estimated total muscle ATP turnover was 19% higher (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (1196 +/- 90 versus 1011 +/- 59 mmol) and true mechanical efficiency was lower (P < 0.05) in CUR than in CON (26.2 +/- 2.0 versus 30.9 +/- 1.5%). In conclusion, the present findings provide evidence that FT fibres are less efficient than ST fibres in vivo at a contraction frequency of 1 Hz, and that the muscle VO2 kinetics is slowed by FT fibre activation.

  • 11. Krustrup, Peter
    et al.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Mohr, Magni
    Bangsbo, Jens
    Slow-twitch fiber glycogen depletion elevates moderate-exercise fast-twitch fiber activity and O2 uptake.2004In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 973-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: We tested the hypotheses that previous glycogen depletion of slow-twitch (ST) fibers enhances recruitment of fast-twitch (FT) fibers, elevates energy requirement, and results in a slow component of VO2 during moderate-intensity dynamic exercise in humans. METHODS: Twelve healthy, male subjects cycled for 20 min at approximately 50% VO2max with normal glycogen stores (CON) and with exercise-induced glycogen depleted ST fibers (CHO-DEP). Pulmonary VO2 was measured continuously and single fiber, muscle homogenate, and blood metabolites were determined repeatedly during each trial. RESULTS: ST fiber glycogen content decreased (P < 0.05) during CON (293 +/- 24 to 204 +/- 17 mmol x kg d.w.), but not during CHO-DEP (92 +/- 22 and 84 +/- 13 mmol x kg d.w.). FT fiber CP and glycogen levels were unaltered during CON, whereas FT fiber CP levels decreased (29 +/- 7%, P < 0.05) during CHO-DEP and glycogen content tended to decrease (32 +/- 14%, P = 0.07). During CHO-DEP, VO2 was higher (P < 0.05) from 2 to 20 min than in CON (0-20 min:7 +/- 1%). Muscle lactate, pH and temperature, ventilation, and plasma epinephrine were not different between trials. From 3 to 20 min of CHO-DEP, VO2 increased (P <0.05) by 5 +/- 1% from 1.95 +/- 0.05 to 2.06 +/- 0.08 L x min but was unchanged during CON. In this exercise period, muscle pH and blood lactate were unaltered in both trials. Exponential modeling revealed a slow component of VO2 equivalent to 0.12 +/- 0.04 L x min during CHO-DEP. CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates that previous glycogen depletion of ST fibers enhances FT fiber recruitment, elevates O2 cost, and causes a slow component of VO2 during dynamic exercise with no blood lactate accumulation or muscular acidosis. These findings suggest that FT fiber recruitment elevates energy requirement of dynamic exercise in humans and support an important role of active FT fibers in producing the slow component of VO2

  • 12.
    Krustrup, Peter
    et al.
    Inst of exercise and sport sciences, Dept of human physiology August Krogh Institute University of Copenhagen.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Mohr, Magni
    Bangsbo, Jens
    The slow component of oxygen uptake during intense, sub-maximal exercise in man is associated with additional fibre recruitment.2004In: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0031-6768, E-ISSN 1432-2013, Vol. 447, no 6, p. 855-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Single muscle fibre metabolites and pulmonary oxygen uptake (VO2) were measured during moderate and intense, sub-maximal exercise to test the hypothesis that additional fibre recruitment is associated with the slow component of VO2. Seven healthy, male subjects performed 20 min moderate (MOD, approximately 50% of VO(2,max)) and intense (INT, approximately 80% VO(2,max)) cycling at 70 rpm. Glycogen content decreased significantly in type I and IIa fibres during INT, but only in type I fibres during MOD. During INT, creatine phosphate (CP) content decreased significantly both in types I and II fibres in the first 3 min (DeltaCP: 16.0+/-2.7 and 16.8+/-4.7 mmol kg(-1) d.w., respectively) and in the next 3 min (DeltaCP: 16.2+/-4.9 and 25.7+/-6.7 mmol kg(-1) d.w., respectively) with no further change from 6-20 min. CP content was below the pre-exercise level (mean-1 SD) in 11, 37, 70 and 74% of the type I fibres after 0, 3, 6 and 20 min of INT, respectively, and in 13, 45, 83 and 74% of the type II fibres. During INT, VO2 increased significantly by 6+/-1 and 4+/-1% in the periods 3-6 and 6-20 min, respectively (Delta VO(2,(6-3 min)): 0.14+/-0.02 l min(-1)), whereas VO2 was unchanged from 3 to 20 min of MOD. Exponential fitting revealed a slow component of VO2 during INT that appeared after approximately 2.6 min and amounted to 0.24 l min(-1). The present study demonstrates that additional type I and II fibres are recruited with time during intense sub-maximal exercise in temporal association with a significant slow component of VO2.

  • 13.
    Krustrup, Peter
    et al.
    Inst of exercise and sport sciences, dept of human physiology, August Krogh Institut, University of Copenhagen.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Mohr, Magni
    González-Alonso, José
    Bangsbo, Jens
    Recruitment of fibre types and quadriceps muscle portions during repeated, intense knee-extensor exercise in humans.2004In: Pflügers Archiv: European Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0031-6768, E-ISSN 1432-2013, Vol. 449, no 1, p. 56-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To investigate recruitment of slow-twitch (ST) and fast-twitch (FT) muscle fibres, as well as the involvement of the various quadriceps femoris muscle portions during repeated, intense, one-legged knee-extensor exercise, 12 healthy male subjects performed two 3-min exercise bouts at approximately 110% maximum thigh O2 consumption (EX1 and EX2) separated by 6 min rest. Single-fibre metabolites were determined in successive muscle biopsies obtained from the vastus lateralis muscle (n = 6) and intra-muscular temperatures were continuously measured at six quadriceps muscle sites (n = 6). Creatine phosphate (CP) had decreased (P < 0.05) by 27, 73 and 88% in ST fibres and 25, 71 and 89% in FT fibres after 15 and 180 s of EX1 and after 180 s of EX2, respectively. CP was below resting mean-1 SD in 15, 46, 84 and 100% of the ST fibres and 9, 48, 85 and 100% of the FT fibres at rest, after 15 and 180 s of EX1 and after 180 s of EX2, respectively. A significant muscle temperature increase (deltaTm) occurred within 2-4 s at all quadriceps muscle sites. DeltaTm varied less than 10% between sites during EX1, but was 23% higher (P < 0.05) in the vastus lateralis than in the rectus femoris muscle during EX2. DeltaTm in the vastus lateralis was 101 and 109% of the mean quadriceps value during EX1 and EX2, respectively. We conclude that both fibre types and all quadriceps muscle portions are recruited at the onset of intense knee-extensor exercise, that essentially all quadriceps muscle fibres are activated during repeated intense exercise and that metabolic measurements in the vastus lateralis muscle provide a good indication of the whole-quadriceps muscle metabolism during repeated, intense, one-legged knee-extensor exercise.

  • 14.
    Mattsson, C. Mikael
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Flockhart, Mikael
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Hendo, Gina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Jakobsson, Madeleine
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Pontén, Marjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Effects of prolonged low intensity exercise with energy deficit (military training operation) on markers of muscle protein turnover.2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    It is well known that ultra-endurance exercise, such as Adventure racing and military operations, often induce substantial energy deficits. This suggests a catabolic state, but the exact effects on protein turnover have not yet been sufficiently investigated. The aim of this study was to examine several markers involved in muscle protein turnover before and after a multi-day physically demanding military training operation.

    Methods

    Seven female (age 21 ± 5 years, weight 71.2 ± 6.6 kg) and seventeen male (age 20 ± 1 years, weight 76.6 ± 6.2 kg) performed a 185 hours military training operation. Energy intake was estimated from food supply and energy expenditure was calculated from continuous heart rate and accelerometer recordings. Muscle biopsies were taken from M Vastus Lateralis before and after the operation.

    Results

    A negative energy balance of 1,500-2,000 kcal/24 hours was estimated. Body weight declined 3.4 (95% CI 3.0-3.8) kg and muscle explosive strength, evaluated from squad and counter movement jumps, was reduced 5 and 6 %, respectively, after the operation with no difference between genders. Muscle glycogen content was reduced from 269 ± 58 to 181 ± 44 mmol/kg dry muscle (p<0.05) with no difference between genders. Muscle content of mTOR and p70 as well as MAFbx were unchanged while the protein content of MuRF-1 was significantly down regulated in both genders.

    Discussion

    The study indicated that prolonged low intensity exercise with substantial energy deficit reduces muscle function and muscle glycogen content. Proteins for muscle synthesis mTOR and p70 were unchanged while the down regulation of MuRF-1 indicates a protection against muscle break down during the energy deficit situation, preserving the muscle mass.

  • 15.
    Moberg, Marcus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Hendo, Gina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Jakobsson, Madeleine
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Mattsson, C. Mikael
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Flockhart, Mikael
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Pontén, Marjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Increased autophagy signalling but not proteasome activity in human skeletal muscle after prolonged low-intensity exercise with negative energy balance2017In: ICSPP Abstracts: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Volume 20, Supplement 2, November 2017, Pages S166, 2017, Vol. 20, no Supplement 2, p. S166-, article id 287Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Moberg, Marcus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Hendo, Gina
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Madelene
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, C Mikael
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom-Bak, Elin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Flockhart, Mikael
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Pontén, Marjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Increased autophagy signaling but not proteasome activity in human skeletal muscle after prolonged low-intensity exercise with negative energy balance2017In: Physiological Reports, E-ISSN 2051-817X, Vol. 5, no 23, article id e13518Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little is known about the molecular regulation of skeletal muscle protein turnover during exercise in field conditions where energy is intake inadequate. Here, 17 male and 7 female soldiers performed an 8 day long field based military operation. Vastus lateralis muscle biopsies, in which autophagy, the ubiquitin-proteasome system and the mTORC1 signaling pathway where studied, were collected before and after the operation. The 187 h long operation resulted in a 15% and 29% negative energy balance as well as a 4.1% and 4.6% loss of body mass in women and men respectively. After the operation protein levels of ULK1 as well as the phosphorylation of ULK1Ser317 and ULK1Ser555 had increased by 11%, 39% and 13%, respectively, and this was supported by a 17% increased phosphorylation of AMPKThr172 (P<0.05). The LC3b-I/II ratio was 3-fold higher after compared to before the operation (P<0.05), whereas protein levels of p62/SQSTM1 were unchanged. The β1, β2, and β5 activity of the proteasome and protein levels of MAFbx did not change, while levels of MuRF-1 were slightly reduced (6%, P<0.05). Protein levels and phosphorylation status of key components in the mTORC1 signaling pathway remained at basal levels after the operation. Muscle levels of glycogen decreased from 269±12 to 181±9 mmol ∙ kg dry muscle-1 after the exercise period (P<0.05). In conclusion, the 8 days of field based exercise resulted in induction of autophagy without any increase in proteasome activity or protein ubiquitination. Simultaneously, the regulation of protein synthesis through the mTORC1 signaling pathway was maintained.

  • 17.
    Ortenblad, Niels
    et al.
    Univ Southem Denmark, SDU Muscle Res Cluster, Dept Sports Sci & Clin Biomech, Odense, Denmark.;Univ British Columbia, Sch Kinesiol, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Nielsen, Joachim
    Univ Southem Denmark, SDU Muscle Res Cluster, Dept Sports Sci & Clin Biomech, Odense, Denmark..
    Boushel, Robert
    Univ British Columbia, Sch Kinesiol, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Saltin, Bengt
    Copenhagen Muscle Res Ctr, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Mid Sweden Univ, Swedish Winter Sports Res Ctr, Ostersund, Sweden.;UiT Arctic Univ Norway, Sch Sport Sci, Tromso, Norway..
    The Muscle Fiber Profiles, Mitochondrial Content, and Enzyme Activities of the Exceptionally Well-Trained Arm and Leg Muscles of Elite Cross-Country Skiers2018In: Frontiers in Physiology, ISSN 1664-042X, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 9, article id 1031Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As one of the most physically demanding sports in the Olympic Games, cross-country skiing poses considerable challenges with respect to both force generation and endurance during the combined upper-and lower-body effort of varying intensity and duration. The isoforms of myosin in skeletal muscle have long been considered not only to define the contractile properties, but also to determine metabolic capacities. The current investigation was designed to explore the relationship between these isoforms and metabolic profiles in the arms (triceps brachii) and legs (vastus lateralis) as well as the range of training responses in the muscle fibers of elite cross-country skiers with equally and exceptionally well-trained upper and lower bodies. The proportion of myosin heavy chain (MHC)-1 was higher in the leg (58 +/- 2% [34-69%]) than arm (40 +/- 3% [24-57%]), although the mitochondrial volume percentages [8.6 +/- 1.6 (leg) and 9.0 +/- 2.0 (arm)], and average number of capillaries per fiber [5.8 +/- 0.8 (leg) and 6.3 +/- 0.3 (arm)] were the same. In these comparable highly trained leg and arm muscles, the maximal citrate synthase (CS) activity was the same. Still, 3-hydroxy-acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HAD) capacity was 52% higher (P < 0.05) in the leg compared to arm muscles, suggesting a relatively higher capacity for lipid oxidation in leg muscle, which cannot be explained by the different fiber type distributions. For both limbs combined, HAD activity was correlated with the content of MHC-1 (r(2) = 0.32, P = 0.011), whereas CS activity was not. Thus, in these highly trained cross-country skiers capillarization of and mitochondrial volume in type 2 fiber can be at least as high as in type 1 fibers, indicating a divergence between fiber type pattern and aerobic metabolic capacity. The considerable variability in oxidative metabolism with similar MHC profiles provides a new perspective on exercise training. Furthermore, the clear differences between equally well-trained arm and leg muscles regarding HAD activity cannot be explained by training status or MHC distribution, thereby indicating an intrinsic metabolic difference between the upper and lower body. Moreover, trained type 1 and type 2A muscle fibers exhibited similar aerobic capacity regardless of whether they were located in an arm or leg muscle.

  • 18. Walsh, B
    et al.
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Hultman, E
    Saks, V
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    The role of phosphorylcreatine and creatine in the regulation of mitochondrial respiration in human skeletal muscle.2001In: Journal of Physiology, ISSN 0022-3751, E-ISSN 1469-7793, Vol. 537, no Pt 3, p. 971-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1. The role of phosphorylcreatine (PCr) and creatine (Cr) in the regulation of mitochondrial respiration was investigated in permeabilised fibre bundles prepared from human vastus lateralis muscle. 2. Fibre respiration was measured in the absence of ADP (V(0)) and after sequential additions of submaximal ADP (0.1 mM ADP, V(submax)), PCr (or Cr) and saturating [ADP] (V(max)). 3. V(submax) increased by 55 % after addition of saturating creatine (P < 0.01; n = 8) and half the maximal effect was obtained at 5 mM [Cr]. In contrast, V(submax) decreased by 54 % after addition of saturating phosphorylcreatine (P < 0.01; n = 8) and half the maximal effect was obtained at 1 mM [PCr]. V(max) was not affected by Cr or PCr. 4. V(submax) was similar when PCr and Cr were added simultaneously at concentrations similar to those in muscle at rest (PCr/Cr = 2) and at low-intensity exercise (PCr/Cr = 0.5). At conditions mimicking high-intensity exercise (PCr/Cr = 0.1), V(submax) increased to 60 % of V(max) (P < 0.01 vs. rest and low-intensity exercise). 5. Eight of the subjects participated in a 16 day Cr supplementation programme. Following Cr supplementation, V(0) decreased by 17 % (P < 0.01 vs. prior to Cr supplementation), whereas ADP-stimulated respiration (with and without Cr or PCr) was unchanged. 6. For the first time evidence is given that PCr is an important regulator of mitochondrial ADP-stimulated respiration. Phosphorylcreatine decreases the sensitivity of mitochondrial respiration to ADP whereas Cr has the opposite effect. During transition from rest to high-intensity exercise, decreases in the PCr/Cr ratio will effectively increase the sensitivity of mitochondrial respiration to ADP. The decrease in V(0) after Cr supplementation indicates that intrinsic changes in membrane proton conductance occur.

  • 19. Westman, Bo
    et al.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Luo, Jia-Li
    Söderlund, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Wernerman, Jan
    Hammarqvist, Folke
    Effects on skeletal muscle glutathione status of ischemia and reperfusion following abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery.2006In: Annals of Vascular Surgery, ISSN 0890-5096, E-ISSN 1615-5947, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 99-105Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glutathione (GSH) is an important endogenous scavenger against reactive oxygen species. Elective abdominal surgery without ischemia and reperfusion leads to decreased muscle GSH concentrations 4-72 hr postoperatively without altering GSH redox status. In the present study, we investigated to what extent muscle GSH status was affected during and following elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. From patients (n = 10) undergoing abdominal aortic repair, thigh muscle specimens were taken preoperatively, at maximal ischemia, and at 10 min and 4, 24, and 48 hr of reperfusion. Specimens were analyzed for GSH, amino acids, and energy-rich compounds. At maximal ischemia, phosphocreatine decreased by 37% (p < 0.05) and lactate and creatine increased by 274% and 57% (p < 0.001 and 0.05), respectively, indicating ischemia during the clamping of aorta. Adenosine triphosphate, on the other hand, remained unaltered during the entire study period. Total GSH (tGSH) decreased by 46% at 24 hr and by 43% at 48 hr of reperfusion (p < 0.001), while reduced GSH decreased by 48% at 24 hr and by 44% at 48 hr (p < 0.001). The redox status (GSH/tGSH) of GSH and oxidized GSH remained unaltered. Among the constituent amino acids of GSH, glycine and cysteine remained unaltered while glutamine and glutamate decreased by 55% and 55%, respectively (p < 0.001). Abdominal aortic aneurysm repair induces metabolic alterations characteristic for ischemia. The antioxidative capacity in terms of muscle levels of GSH was decreased. However, the oxidative stress during reperfusion did not change GSH status more than what has been reported following abdominal surgery without ischemia and reperfusion. The results indicate that the oxidative stress elicited by elective abdominal aortic aneurysm repair is outbalanced by a compensated GSH metabolism not giving rise to an increased amount of oxidized GSH or an altered GSH redox status.

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