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  • 1.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Lönn, Amanda
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Karolinska University Hospital, Solna, Sweden.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysiologi, nutrition och biomekanik.
    Kallings, Lena
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Väisänen, Daniel
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Hemmingsson, Erik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden; University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Holmlund, Tobias
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Lifestyle Habits and Mental Health in Light of the Two COVID-19 Pandemic Waves in Sweden, 20202021Ingår i: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 18, nr 6, artikel-id 3313Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The COVID-19 pandemic has become a public health emergency of international concern, which may have affected lifestyle habits and mental health. Based on national health profile assessments, this study investigated perceived changes of lifestyle habits in response to the COVID-19 pandemic and associations between perceived lifestyle changes and mental health in Swedish working adults. Among 5599 individuals (50% women, 46.3 years), the majority reported no change (sitting 77%, daily physical activity 71%, exercise 69%, diet 87%, alcohol 90%, and smoking 97%) due to the pandemic. Changes were more pronounced during the first wave (April–June) compared to the second (October–December). Women, individuals <60 years, those with a university degree, white-collar workers, and those with unhealthy lifestyle habits at baseline had higher odds of changing lifestyle habits compared to their counterparts. Negative changes in lifestyle habits and more time in a mentally passive state sitting at home were associated with higher odds of mental ill-health (including health anxiety regarding one’s own and relatives’ health, generalized anxiety and depression symptoms, and concerns regarding employment and economy). The results emphasize the need to support healthy lifestyle habits to strengthen the resilience in vulnerable groups of individuals to future viral pandemics and prevent health inequalities in society.

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  • 2.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Hemmingsson, Erik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Kallings, Lena
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, Björn Ekbloms forskningsgrupp.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Latent profile analysis patterns of exercise, sitting and fitness in adults - Associations with metabolic risk factors, perceived health, and perceived symptoms.2020Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, nr 4, artikel-id e0232210Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To identify and describe the characteristics of naturally occurring patterns of exercise, sitting in leisure time and at work and cardiorespiratory fitness, and the association of such profiles with metabolic risk factors, perceived health, and perceived symptoms.

    METHODS: 64,970 participants (42% women, 18-75 years) participating in an occupational health service screening in 2014-2018 were included. Exercise and sitting were self-reported. Cardiorespiratory fitness was estimated using a submaximal cycle test. Latent profile analysis was used to identify profiles. BMI and blood pressure were assessed through physical examination. Perceived back/neck pain, overall stress, global health, and sleeping problems were self-reported.

    RESULTS: Six profiles based on exercise, sitting in leisure time and at work and cardiorespiratory fitness were identified and labelled; Profile 1 "Inactive, low fit and average sitting in leisure, with less sitting at work"; Profile 2 "Inactive, low fit and sedentary"; Profile 3 "Active and average fit, with less sitting at work"; Profile 4 "Active, average fit and sedentary in leisure, with a sedentary work" (the most common profile, 35% of the population); Profile 5 "Active and fit, with a sedentary work"; Profile 6 "Active and fit, with less sitting at work". Some pairwise similarities were found between profiles (1 and 2, 3 and 4, 5 and 6), mainly based on similar levels of exercise, leisure time sitting and fitness, which translated into similar dose-response associations with the outcomes. In general, profile 1 and 2 demonstrated most adverse metabolic and perceived health, profile 4 had a more beneficial health than profile 3, as did profile 6 compared to profile 5.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present results implies a large variation in exercise, sitting, and fitness when studying naturally occurring patterns, and emphasize the possibility to target exercise, sitting time, and/or fitness in health enhancing promotion intervention and strategies.

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  • 3.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Väisänen, Daniel
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysiologi, nutrition och biomekanik.
    Blom, Victoria
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Kallings, Lena
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Hemmingsson, Erik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Sweden.
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Sweden.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Holmlund, Tobias
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lindwall, Magnus
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Stenling, Andreas
    Umeå University, Sweden; University of Agder, Kristiansand, Norway.
    Lönn, Amanda
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Women's Health and Allied Health Professionals Theme Medical Unit Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Cardiorespiratory fitness and lifestyle on severe COVID-19 risk in 279,455 adults: a case control study.2021Ingår i: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 18, nr 1, artikel-id 135Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The impact of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and other lifestyle-related factors on severe COVID-19 risk is understudied. The present study aims to investigate lifestyle-related and socioeconomic factors as possible predictors of COVID-19, with special focus on CRF, and to further study whether these factors may attenuate obesity- and hypertension-related risks, as well as mediate associations between socioeconomic factors and severe COVID-19 risk.

    METHODS: Out of initially 407,131 participants who participated in nationwide occupational health service screening between 1992 and 2020, n = 857 cases (70% men, mean age 49.9 years) of severe COVID-19 were identified. CRF was estimated using a sub-maximum cycle test, and other lifestyle variables were self-reported. Analyses were performed including both unmatched, n = 278,598, and sex-and age-matched, n = 3426, controls. Severe COVID-19 included hospitalization, intensive care or death due to COVID-19.

    RESULTS: Patients with more severe COVID-19 had significantly lower CRF, higher BMI, a greater presence of comorbidities and were more often daily smokers. In matched analyses, there was a graded decrease in odds for severe COVID-19 with each ml in CRF (OR = 0.98, 95% CI 0.970 to 0.998), and a two-fold increase in odds between the lowest and highest (< 32 vs. ≥ 46 ml·min-1·kg-1) CRF group. Higher BMI (per unit increase, OR = 1.09, 1.06 to 1.12), larger waist circumference (per cm, OR = 1.04, 1.02 to 1.06), daily smoking (OR = 0.60, 0.41 to 0.89) and high overall stress (OR = 1.36, 1.001 to 1.84) also remained significantly associated with severe COVID-19 risk. Obesity- and blood pressure-related risks were attenuated by adjustment for CRF and lifestyle variables. Mediation through CRF, BMI and smoking accounted for 9% to 54% of the associations between low education, low income and blue collar/low skilled occupations and severe COVID-19 risk. The results were consistent using either matched or unmatched controls.

    CONCLUSIONS: Both lifestyle-related and socioeconomic factors were associated with risk of severe COVID-19. However, higher CRF attenuated the risk associated with obesity and high blood pressure, and mediated the risk associated with various socioeconomic factors. This emphasises the importance of interventions to maintain or increase CRF in the general population to strengthen the resilience to severe COVID-19, especially in high-risk individuals.

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  • 4.
    Kallings, Lena
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Blom, Victoria
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysiologi, nutrition och biomekanik.
    Holmlund, Tobias
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI, Health Profile Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI, Health Profile Institute, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Workplace sitting is associated with self-reported general health and back/neck pain: a cross-sectional analysis in 44,978 employees.2021Ingår i: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, nr 1, artikel-id 875Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Total sitting time is associated with a higher risk for cardio metabolic disease and mortality, while breaks in prolonged sitting attenuate these effects. However, less is known about associations of different specific domains and breaks of sitting on general health, back/neck pain and if physical activity could influence these associations. The aim was to investigate how workplace sitting and frequency of breaking up workplace sitting is associated with self-reported general health and self-reported back/neck pain.

    METHODS: 44,978 participants (42% women) from the Swedish working population, who participated in a nationwide occupational health service screening 2014-2019, were included in this cross-sectional study. Self-reported sitting duration and frequency of breaks from sitting at work, general health, back/neck pain, exercise, leisure time sitting, diet, smoking, stress and body mass index were assessed. Occupation was classified as requiring higher education qualifications or not. Logistic regression modelling was used to assess the association between workplace sitting/frequency of breaks in workplace sitting and poor general health and back/neck pain, respectively.

    RESULTS: Compared to sitting all the time at work, sitting ≤75% of the time showed significantly lower risks for poor general health (OR range 0.50-0.65), and sitting between 25 and 75% of the time showed significantly lower risks (OR 0.82-0.87) for often reported back/neck pain. For participants reporting sitting half of their working time or more, breaking up workplace sitting occasionally or more often showed significantly lower OR than seldom breaking up workplace sitting; OR ranged 0.40-0.50 for poor health and 0.74-0.81 for back/neck pain.

    CONCLUSIONS: Sitting almost all the time at work and not taking breaks is associated with an increased risk for self-reported poor general health and back/neck pain. People sitting almost all their time at work are recommended to take breaks from prolonged sitting, exercise regularly and decrease their leisure time sitting to reduce the risk for poor health.

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  • 5.
    Lönn, Amanda
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Women's Health and Allied Health Professionals Theme Medical Unit Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kallings, Lena
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa. Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Family Medicine and Preventive Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Paulsson, Sofia
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Lifestyle-related habits and factors before and after cardiovascular diagnosis: a case control study among 2,548 Swedish individuals.2023Ingår i: International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, E-ISSN 1479-5868, Vol. 20, nr 1, artikel-id 41Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Healthy lifestyle habits are recommended in prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD). However, there is limited knowledge concerning the change in lifestyle-related factors from before to after a CVD event. Thus, this study aimed to explore if and how lifestyle habits and other lifestyle-related factors changed between two health assessments in individuals experiencing a CVD event between the assessments, and if changes varied between subgroups of sex, age, educational level, duration from CVD event to second assessment and type of CVD event.

    METHODS: Among 115,504 Swedish employees with data from two assessments of occupational health screenings between 1992 and 2020, a total of 637 individuals (74% men, mean age 47 ± SD 9 years) were identified having had a CVD event (ischemic heart disease, cardiac arrythmia or stroke) between the assessments. Cases were matched with controls without an event between assessments from the same database (ratio 1:3, matching with replacement) by sex, age, and time between assessment (n = 1911 controls). Lifestyle habits included smoking, active commuting, exercise, diet, alcohol intake, and were self-rated. Lifestyle-related factors included overall stress, overall health (both self-rated), physical capacity (estimated by submaximal cycling), body mass index and resting blood pressure. Differences in lifestyle habits and lifestyle-related factors between cases and controls, and changes over time, were analysed with parametric and non-parametric tests. Multiple logistic regression, OR (95% CI) was used to analyse differences in change between subgroups.

    RESULTS: Cases had, in general, a higher prevalence of unhealthy lifestyle habits as well as negative life-style related factors prior to the event compared to controls. Nevertheless, cases improved their lifestyle habits and lifestyle factors to a higher degree than controls, especially their amount of active commuting (p = 0.025), exercise (p = 0.009) and non-smoking (p < 0.001). However, BMI and overall health deteriorated to a greater extent (p < 0.001) among cases, while physical capacity (p < 0.001) decreased in both groups.

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate that a CVD event may increase motivation to improve lifestyle habits. Nonetheless, the prevalence of unhealthy lifestyle habits was still high, emphasizing the need to improve implementation of primary and secondary CVD prevention.

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  • 6. Lövenheim, Boel
    et al.
    Johansson, Christer
    Wahlgren, Lina
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö. Riksidrottsförbundet.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Almström, Peter
    Berglund, Svante
    Markstedt, Anders
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Forsberg, Bertil
    Health risk assessment of reduced air pollution exposure when changing commuting by car to bike2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we have assessed the reduction in traffic emissions and population exposure assuming all potential car commuters would switch to biking if they live within 30 minute travel by bike. The scenario would result in more than 100 000 new bikers and due to the reduced traffic emissions 42 premature deaths would be avoided per year. This is almost twice as large effect as the congestion tax in Stockholm.

     

     

    Introduction

    Regular physical activity has important and wide-ranging health benefits including reduced risk of chronic disease, and physical inactivity is mentioned as perhaps the most important public health problem of the 21st century. At the same time, the direct effects of traffic emissions is a major health problem. Transferring commuting by car to bike will increase physical activity and reduce emissions and reduce population exposure to traffic pollution. The exposure of commuters will also change; new bikers may get higher exposure whilst old bikers and car drivers may get lower exposures, depending on commuting route and distance.

     

    Methodology

    In this study we have calculated the potential number of car-to-bike switching commuters depending on distance, travel time, age of commuters, etc. We have made calculations for a 30-minute biking scenario, i.e. transferring all car commuters to bike if their travel time by bike is less than or equal to 30 minutes. The commuting distance depends on age and sex. For the travel and traffic modelling the LuTrans model was used. It includes all different modes of travel; walking, bicycling, public transport systems and car traffic. The model was developed based on travel survey data and is regularly calibrated using traffic counts. Emissions from road traffic were calculated based on HBEFA 3.2. A Gaussian dispersion model was used estimate exposures over the county of Stockholm.

     

    Results

    The 30 min scenario resulted in 106 881 more bikers, an increase of 2.6 times compared to base scenario. Of all bikers 50% were men and the mean age of all bikers was 42. The traffic emissions of NOx was reduced by up to 7%. Up to 20% reduction in traffic contribution to NOx concentrations was calculated as shown in Figure 1. The mean reduction in concentration for the whole area is 6% and the largest occur were most people live.

    The population weighted mean NOx concentration for 1.6 million people in Greater Stockholm is estimated to be reduced by 0.41 μg m-3. Assuming that the premature mortality is reduced by 8% per 10 μg m-3 (Nafstad et al., 2004), this corresponds to 42 avoided premature deaths every year or 514 gained life years gained. This is even somewhat more beneficial than the effects of the congestion charge in Stockholm (Johansson et al., 2009), which was estimated to save 27 premature deaths per year. The gain in reduced mortality is almost as large as the gain in health of the increased physical activity.

     

    Conclusions

    Transferring car commuters to bike is not only beneficial for the physical activity, but will also lead to reduced traffic emissions and reduced population exposure. Our estimates show that it may be even more beneficial for mortality due to air pollution exposure than the congestion charge in Stockholm.

     

    Acknowledgement

    This project was funded by the Swedish Research Council for Health, Working life and Welfare.

     

    References

    Johansson, C., Burman, L., Forsberg, B. 2009. The effects of congestions tax on air quality and health. Atmos. Environ. 43, 4843-4854.

    Nafstad, P., Lund Håheim, L., Wisloeff, T., Gram, G., Oftedal, B., Holme, I., Hjermann, I. and Leren, P. 2004. Urban Air Pollution and Mortality in a Cohort of Norwegian Men. Environ. Health Perspect. 112, 610-615.

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  • 7.
    Olsson, Karin
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Are heart rate methods based on ergometer cycling and level treadmill walking interchangeable?2020Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 15, nr 8, artikel-id e02373Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. The heart rate (HR) method is a promising approach for evaluating oxygen uptake (V̇O2), energy demands and exercise intensities in different forms of physical activities. It would be valuable if the HR method, established on ergometer cycling, is interchangeable with other regular activities, such as level walking. This study therefore aimed to examine the interchangeability of the HR method when estimating V̇O2 for ergometer cycling and level treadmill walking in submaximal conditions. 

     

    Methods. Two models of HR-V̇O2 regression equations for cycle ergometer exercise (CEE) and treadmill exercise (TE) were established with 34 active commuters. Model 1 consisted of three submaximal intensities of ergometer cycling or level walking, model 2 included also one additional workload of maximal ergometer cycling or running. The regression equations were used for estimating V̇O2 with seven individual HR values based on 25-85% of HR reserve (HRR). The V̇O2 estimations were compared between CEE and TE, within and between each model.

     

    Results. Only minor, and in most cases non-significant, average differences were observed when comparing the estimated V̇O2 levels between CEE and TE. Model 1 ranged from -0.4 to 4.8% (n.s.) between 25-85 %HRR. In model 2, the differences between 25-65 %HRR ranged from 1.3 to -2.7% (n.s.). At the two highest intensities, 75 and 85 %HRR, V̇O2 was slightly lower (3.7%, 4.4%; P < 0.05), for CEE than TE. The inclusion of maximal exercise in the HR-V̇O2 relationships reduced the individual V̇O2 variations between the two exercise modalities.

     

    Conclusion. The HR methods, based on submaximal ergometer cycling and level walking, are interchangeable for estimating mean V̇O2 levels between 25-85% of HRR. Essentially, the same applies when adding maximal exercise in the HR-V̇O2 relationships. The inter-individual V̇O2 variation between ergometer cycling and treadmill exercise is reduced when using the HR method based on both submaximal and maximal workloads.

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  • 8.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för tillämpad idrottsvetenskap (LTIV). Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö. Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för biomekanik och motorisk kontroll (BMC).
    Gullstrand, Lennart
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Johansson, Patrik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, Björn Ekbloms och Mats Börjessons forskningsgrupp.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Evaluation of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system against the Douglas bag method.2010Ingår i: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 109, nr 2, s. 159-171Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to evaluate two versions of the Oxycon Mobile portable metabolic system (OMPS1 and OMPS2) in a wide range of oxygen uptake, using the Douglas bag method (DBM) as criterion method. The metabolic variables VO2, VCO2, respiratory exchange ratio and VE were measured during submaximal and maximal cycle ergometer exercise with sedentary, moderately trained individuals and athletes as participants. Test-retest reliability was investigated using the OMPS1. The coefficients of variation varied between 2 and 7% for the metabolic parameters measured at different work rates and resembled those obtained with the DBM. With the OMPS1, systematic errors were found in the determination of VO2 and VCO2. At submaximal work rates VO2 was 6-14% and VCO2 5-9% higher than with the DBM. At VO2max both VO2 and VCO2 were slightly lower as compared to DBM (-4.1 and -2.8% respectively). With OMPS2, VO2 was determined accurately within a wide measurement range (about 1-5.5 L min(-1)), while VCO2 was overestimated (3-7%). VE was accurate at submaximal work rates with both OMPS1 and OMPS2, whereas underestimations (4-8%) were noted at VO2max. The present study is the first to demonstrate that a wide range of VO2 can be measured accurately with the Oxycon Mobile portable metabolic system (second generation). Future investigations are suggested to clarify reasons for the small errors noted for VE and VCO2 versus the Douglas bag measurements, and also to gain knowledge of the performance of the device under applied and non-laboratory conditions.

  • 9.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Validation of data collected with mobile metabolic measurement systems over time during active commuting2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    With the aim of attaining valid descriptions of metabolic demands during active commuting in greater Stockholm new approaches have been used. We have previously reported evaluations of a mobile metabolic measurement system both in the laboratory (Rosdahl et al. 2010) and during simulated field conditions, including check of stability over time (Salier-Eriksson et al. 2012). However, to be confident with the validity of the metabolic data collected over time during mobile field conditions we have used new approaches. 

    Methods

    During the period of data collection in the field with the mobile metabolic system (Oxycon Mobile, JLAB 5.21, CareFusion, Germany) this was controlled once by the manufacturer and 11 times in our own laboratory using a commercially available metabolic calibrator (Vacumed, syringe No.1750 and mass flow controller No. 17052, Ventura, CA, USA).  On each occasion VO2 and VCO2 were checked between 1 - 4 L/min with the corresponding VE at 40-160 L/minute and tidal volume at 2 L. The calibration information (offset, gain and delay time) from the O2 and CO2 analyzers and volume sensor, being collected pre and post the field commuting tests, was analyzed. Additionally, the results of each experiment was critically examined in several means including an inspection of parallelism in heart rate and VO2. 

    Results and Discussion

    As examined with the metabolic calibrator, all parameters (VO2, VCO2, RER and VE) measured by the mobile metabolic system were in general well within the boundaries of acceptance. Adequate stability of the O2 and CO2 analyzers and volume sensors for the time duration of each experiment was confirmed by small differences in the pre- and post-calibration factors. Based on two researchers´ ocular inspections of heart rate and oxygen uptake recordings during active commuting, all but one were rated as generally parallel, and thus passed this type of check of the field measurements. Overall, the present investigation favors that data collected over time with a mobile metabolic system can be validated by a combination of metabolic calibrator measurements, analyses of calibration information and a critical examination of the variables from each single measurement.

    References

    Rosdahl, H., Gullstrand, L., Salier Eriksson, J., Johansson, P. & Schantz, P. 2010. Evaluation of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system against the Douglas bag method. Eur J Appl Physiol 109 (2):159-71.

    Salier Eriksson, J., Rosdahl, H. & Schantz, P. 2012. Validity of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system under field measuring conditions. Eur J Appl Physiol, 112 (1): 345-355.

    Huszczuk, A., Whipp, B.J and Wasserman, K. 1990. A respiratory gas exchange simulator for routine calibration in metabolic studies. Eur. Respir. J. 3:465-468.

  • 10.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier-Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Measurements of Metabolic Profiles of Commuting Pedestrians and Cyclists using Validated Indirect Calorimetry2010Ingår i: Proceedings from The 3rd International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, Toronto, May, 5-8, 2010, 2010, s. 36-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 11.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Hjärtfrekvensmetod för beräkning av syreupptagning under gång- och cykelpendling: ny avhandling2018Ingår i: Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 1103-7652, Vol. 7, nr 4, s. 29-31Artikel i tidskrift (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 12.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Kan val av transportsätt bidra till bättre folkhälsa och miljö?2013Ingår i: Svensk Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 1103-7652, nr 2, s. 20-22Artikel, recension (Övrig (populärvetenskap, debatt, mm))
  • 13.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    The heart rate method for estimating oxygen uptake in walking and cycle commuting: Evaluations based on reproducibility and validity studies of the heart rate method and a portable metabolic system2018Doktorsavhandling, sammanläggning (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    Walking and cycling to work can contribute to population health, but more objective knowledge concerning exercise intensities, oxygen uptake and the metabolic demands of this physical activity is needed for this and other evaluations. To attain this, valid and reliable instruments are a requirement. The focus of this thesis was to evaluate whether the heart rate method can be used for this purpose. It involves establishing the relation between heart rate and oxygen uptake during ergometer cycling in laboratory conditions, and thereafter checking if the same relation exists during cycle or walking commuting in a metropolitan area.

    To accomplish this, a portable metabolic system was tested for validity and reliability in laboratory and field conditions and the reproducibility of the heart rate and oxygen uptake relation in the laboratory was evaluated. Furthermore, the heart rate and oxygen uptake relations during cycle and walking commuting was compared with those attained in the laboratory.

    The first two studies showed that a portable metabolic system is valid during laboratory and sustained field conditions. Studies 3 and 4 showed that the heart rate method with respect to the heart rate-oxygen uptake relationship is reliable on the group level for both walking and cycling commuters during repeated measures in the laboratory. The last two studies showed that applying the heart rate method during cycle commuting leads to valid levels of oxygen uptake on the group level for both males and females. Contrary to that, the measured levels of oxygen uptake in the field during walking commuting were on average 17% higher for males, and 13% higher for females than the values obtained with the heart rate method. For both walking and cycling commuters, the individual spread around the mean values was rather high, creating somewhat wide confidence intervals for the mean values.

    In summary, the heart rate method can be used for cycle commuters during their normal commuting conditions, while for pedestrians it is necessary to take into account that oxygen uptake per heart rate is higher while walking than that estimated from ergometer cycling in the laboratory.

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  • 14.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Blom, Victoria
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Forskningsgruppen för idrottspsykologi.
    Kallings, Lena
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Hemmingsson, Erik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, Björn Ekbloms forskningsgrupp.
    Andersson, G
    Wallin, P
    Stenling, A
    Lindwall, M
    Latent profiles of sedentary time, exercise and cardiorespiratory fitness in adults, and the associations with metabolic and percieved health2019Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 15.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysiologi, nutrition och biomekanik.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI.
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    How should we scale VO2max for body size differences for best prediction of CVD incidence and all-cause mortality?2021Ingår i: Svensk idrottsmedicin 2021:3, 2021, s. 40-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 16.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysiologi, nutrition och biomekanik.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden..
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI Health Profile Institute, Danderyd, Sweden..
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Scaling VO2max to body size differences to evaluate associations to CVD incidence and all-cause mortality risk.2021Ingår i: BMJ open sport & exercise medicine, ISSN 2055-7647, Vol. 7, nr 1, artikel-id e000854Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To evaluate and compare ratio and allometric scaling models of maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max) for different body size measurements in relation to cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and all-cause mortality.

    Methods: 316 116 individuals participating in occupational health screenings, initially free from CVD, were included. VO2max was estimated using submaximal cycle test. Height, body mass and waist circumference (WC) were assessed, and eight different scaling models (two evaluated in a restricted sample with WC data) were derived. Participants were followed in national registers for first-time CVD event or all-cause mortality from their health screening to first CVD event, death or 31 December 2015.

    Results: Increasing deciles of VO2max showed lower CVD risk and all-cause mortality for all six models in the full sample (p<0.001) as well as with increasing quintiles in the restricted sample (eight models) (p<0.001). For CVD risk and all-cause mortality, significantly weaker associations with increasing deciles for models 1 (L·min-1) and 5 (mL·min-1·height-2) were seen compared with model 2 (mL·min-1·kg-1), (CVD, p<0.00001; p<0.00001: all-cause mortality, p=0.008; p=0.001) and in some subgroups. For CVD, model 6 (mL·min-1·(kg1·height-1)-1) had a stronger association compared with model 2 (p<0.00001) and in some subgroups.In the restricted sample, trends for significantly stronger associations for models including WC compared with model 2 were seen in women for both CVD and all-cause mortality, and those under 50 for CVD.

    Conclusion: In association to CVD and all-cause mortality, only small differences were found between ratio scaling and allometric scaling models where body dimensions were added, with some stronger associations when adding WC in the models.

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  • 17.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, Björn Ekbloms forskningsgrupp.
    Kallings, Lena
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Hemmingsson, Erik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    HPI Health Profile Institute.
    Wallin, Peter
    HPI Health Profile Institute.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet.
    Active commuting in Swedish workers between 1998 and 2015 - trends, characteristics and cardiovascular disease risk.2020Ingår i: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 30, nr 2Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Trend analyses of active commuting and potential variations in trends and association with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk within sub-groups are unknown.

    OBJECTIVES: To a) describe trends in active commuting between 1998 to 2015 and b) to study the association between different amounts of active commuting and the incidence risk of CVD in a large sample of Swedish workers, and analyses of potential variations across sub-groups of socio-demographics, physical activity and BMI.

    METHODS: A total of 318,309 participants (47% women, 18-74 years) who participated in a nationwide occupational health service screening between 1998 and 2015 were included. Commuting habits were self-reported, and data on first-time CVD events were derived from national registers.

    RESULTS: Self-reported passive commuters decreased between 1998 and 2015 (64% to 56%), transferring to an increase in mainly moderate/high-dose active commuters (12% to 19%). Changes were seen in all subgroups. The characteristics and life-style habits of the typical passive and active commuter changed little over the study period. Low- and moderate/high-dose active commuters had significantly decreased risks for a first time CVD during follow-up. This was accentuated in men, middle-aged and in participants with light physical work situations, irregular exercise habits, being overweight/obese and with low fitness.

    CONCLUSION: Increases in active commuting were observed between 1998 and 2015, however still leaving a majority who do not actively commute. As active commuting, regardless dose, is associated with a lower CVD risk, encouraging more people to actively commute may provide an easily accessible and time-efficient possibility to increase physical activity and health in the general population.

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  • 18.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Olsson, Karin
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysiologi, nutrition och biomekanik.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Heart Rate Methods Can Be Valid for Estimating Intensity Spectrums of Oxygen Uptake in Field Exercise.2021Ingår i: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 12, artikel-id 687566Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Quantifying intensities of physical activities through measuring oxygen uptake (V̇O2) is of importance for understanding the relation between human movement, health and performance. This can in principle be estimated by the heart rate (HR) method, based on the linear relationship between HR and V̇O2 established in the laboratory. It needs, however, to be explored whether HR methods, based on HR-V̇O2 relationships determined in the laboratory, are valid for estimating spectrums of V̇O2 in field exercise. We hereby initiate such studies, and use cycle commuting as the form of exercise.

    Methods: Ten male and ten female commuter cyclists underwent measurements of HR and V̇O2 while performing ergometer cycling in a laboratory and a normal cycle commute in the metropolitan area of Stockholm County, Sweden. Two models of individual HR-V̇O2 relationships were established in the laboratory through linear regression equations. Model 1 included three submaximal work rates, whereas model 2 also involved a maximal work rate. The HR-V̇O2 regression equations of the two models were then used to estimate V̇O2 at six positions of field HR: five means of quintiles and the mean of the whole commute. The estimations obtained were for both models compared with the measured V̇O2.

    Results: The measured quintile range during commuting cycling was about 45-80% of V̇O2max. Overall, there was a high resemblance between the estimated and measured V̇O2, without any significant absolute differences in either males or females (range of all differences: -0.03-0.20 L⋅min-1). Simultaneously, rather large individual differences were noted.

    Conclusion: The present HR methods are valid at group level for estimating V̇O2 of cycle commuting characterized by relatively wide spectrums of exercise intensities. To further the understanding of the external validity of the HR method, there is a need for studying other forms of field exercises.

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  • 19.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Is the heart rate method for estimating oxygen consumption valid in cycle commuting?Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 20.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Is the heart rate method for estimating oxygen consumption valid in walking commuting?Manuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 21.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Relationships between heart rate and oxygen uptake in laboratory conditions and in bicycling commuting2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Measuring the energetic demands of habitual commuter cyclists is essential to create more accurate methods for measuring active commuting so as to be able to objectively determine the impact that cycle commuting can have on population health.

    Heart rate (HR) can be used as an indicator of aerobic processes while commuter cycling as long as the relationship between oxygen uptake (VO2) and HR is established in laboratory conditions. However in the field, environmental aspects might introduce effects of stress that change the relationship. Thus measurements need also to be performed in the field in order to explore the HR-VO2 relationship between the two conditions.

    Methods. Metabolic measurements were performed in the laboratory as well as in the field using 20 habitual commuter cyclists (10 males and 10 females) aged 44 ± 3 yrs. A validated stationary as well as a portable metabolic system was used (Rosdahl et al. 2010; 2016; Salier-Eriksson et al. 2012). A comparison was made between the laboratory and field conditions of the HR-VO2 relationship.

    Results and Discussion. Based on the average heart rate, the measured oxygen uptake was about 2.5 % lower (n.s.) than the expected levels based on the steady state HR-VO2 relationships in the laboratory. Thus, the results indicate that the HR-VO2 relationships in the field were comparable to those measured in the laboratory on a group level. However, relatively large individual differences were found.

    References

    Rosdahl, H., Gullstrand, L., Salier Eriksson, J., Johansson, P. & Schantz, P. 2010. Evaluation of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system against the Douglas bag method. Eur J Appl Physiol 109 (2):159-71.

    Rosdahl, H., Salier Eriksson, J. & Schantz, P. 2016. Validation of data collected with mobile metabolic measurement systems over time during active commuting. Proceedings of the 21st Annual Congress of The European College of Sport Sciences, Vienna, Austria, 6-8 July (Abstract).  

    Salier Eriksson, J., Rosdahl, H. & Schantz, P. 2012. Validity of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system under field measuring conditions. Eur J Appl Physiol, 112 (1): 345-355.

     

     

     

  • 22.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Schantz, Peter
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Validity of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system under field measuring conditions2012Ingår i: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 112, nr 1, s. 345-355Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Purpose: It is essential to validate portable metabolic systems, not only in laboratory settings, but also in field measuring conditions, such as prolonged moderate exercise at low temperatures, high humidity and with external wind.

     

    Methods: VO2, VCO2, RER and VE were measured using the Oxycon Mobile (OM), with a windshield, during cycle ergometer exercise: (I) indoors at three submaximal workloads with no wind or with external wind (13–20 m·s-1) from front, side and back; (II) at two submaximal workloads outdoors (12 ± 2oC; 86 ± 7% RH), with and without a system for drying the ambient air around the air sampling tube; and (III) at one workload outdoors for 45 min (5 ± 4oC; 69 ± 16.5% RH). Any physiological drift was checked for with pre- and postmeasurements by the Douglas bag method (DBM).

     

    Results: A minor effect of external wind from behind was noted in RER and VE (-2 and -3%).. The system for drying the ambient air around the gas sampling tube had no effect on the measured levels. A small difference in VCO2 drift between the OM and DBM (1.5 mL·min-2) was noted in the stability test.

     

    Conclusion: Heavy external wind applied from different directions generally does not affect the measurements of the OM. Furthermore, when using a unit for drying the ambient air around the gas sampling tube, the OM can accurately measure VO2, RER and VE   at submaximal workloads for at least45 min under challenging conditions with regard to humidity and temperature.

     

  • 23.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Olsson, Karin Sofia Elisabeth
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysisk aktivitet och hälsa.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för fysiologi, nutrition och biomekanik.
    Perspectives on exercise intensity, volume, step characteristics and health outcomes in walking for transport2022Ingår i: Frontiers In Public Health, ISSN 2296-2565, s. 1-19, artikel-id 911863Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Quantification of movement intensity and energy utilization, together with frequency of trips, duration, distance, step counts and cadence, is essential for interpreting the character of habitual walking for transport, and its potential support of health. The purpose of the study is to illuminate this with valid methods and novel perspectives, and to thereby provide a new basis for characterizing and interpreting walking in relation to health outcomes.

    Methods: Habitual middle-aged commuting pedestrians (males = 10, females= 10) were investigated in the laboratory at rest and with maximal treadmill and cycle ergometer tests. Thereafter, levels of oxygen uptake, energy expenditure, ventilation, heart rate, blood lactate, rated perceived exertion, cadence, number of steps, duration, distance, and speed were recorded during the normal walking commute of each participant in Greater Stockholm, Sweden. The number of commutes per week over the year was self-reported.

    Results: Walking in the field demanded about 30% more energy per km compared to level treadmill walking. For both sexes, the walking intensity in field was about 46% of maximal oxygen uptake, and energy expenditure amounted to 0.96 kcal · kg−1 · km−1. The MET values (males: 6.2; females:6.5) mirrored similar levels of walking speed (males: 5.7; females: 5.9 km · h−1) and levels of oxygen uptake (males: 18.6; females: 19.5mL · kg−1 · min−1). The average number of MET-hours per week in a typical month was 22 for males and 20 for females. This resulted in a total weekly energy expenditure of∼1,570 and 1,040 kcal for males and females, respectively. Over the year, the number of walking commutes and their accumulated distance was ∼385 tripsand 800 km for both sexes.

    Conclusion: Walking in naturalistic field settings demands its own studies. When males and females walk to work, their relative aerobic intensities and absolute energy demands for a given distance are similar. It is equivalent to the lower part of the moderate relative intensity domain.The combination of oxygen uptake, trip duration and frequency leads to high and sustained levels of MET-hours as well as energy expenditure per week over the year, with a clear health enhancing potential. Based on this study we recommend 6000 transport steps per day, or equivalent, during five weekdays, over the year, in order to reach optimal health gains.

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  • 24.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Laboratoriet för tillämpad idrottsvetenskap (LTIV).
    An Overview, Description and Synthesis of Methodological Issues in Studying Oxygen Consumption during Walking and Cycling Commuting using a Portable Metabolic System (Oxycon Mobile).2018Övrigt (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [en]

    From the time of the independent discoveries of oxygen by Carl Wilhelm Scheele in Sweden and Joseph Priestly in England in the 1770s, there has been an ongoing chain of methodological developments, from the pioneering ones by Antoine Lavoisier until today, with the aim of measuring oxygen uptake and metabolic processes of man in motion (Mitchell and Saltin 2003). This historical development, has, not least during the last decades, also included both automated stationary and portable open-circuit metabolic measurement systems, which have been thoroughly reviewed recently (Macfarlane 2017; Ward 2018; Taylor et al. 2018).  

    When two of the present authors (PS and HR) were trained as exercise physiologists, the golden standard method in this respect, the Douglas bag method (DBM), was the only, or the predominantly used method at our laboratory. In the 1990s, automated stationary open-circuit metabolic measurement systems started to be used, and HR evaluated some of them using DBM. He noted that it was not apparent that one could rely on the data produced in these “black box” systems. Still they have been used in many laboratories, and possibly there are a number of scientific articles based on them which might hold invalid data. One comment along that line was sent in 2001 as an e-mail from our teacher, professor emeritus Per-Olof Åstrand to an American colleague (Appendix 1). It ended with: “I have observed many odd data in the literature which can be explained as a consequence of uncritical use of modern, fancy electronic equipments without serious and competent evaluation of their accuracy”.

    For HR, these kind of experiences during the 1990s became an important impetus to develop a refined system for the Douglas bag method at the Laboratory for Applied Sport Sciences at the Swedish School for Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, in Stockholm, Sweden. That process was undertaken in close collaboration with Lennart Gullstrand at the Elite Sports Centre, The Swedish Sports Confederation, Bosön, Lidingö, Sweden. This text builds on that system, and many other developmental steps that have been taken since then. They have been applied to study a number of issues related to walking and cycle commuting, as part of the multidisciplinary research project on Physically Active Commuting in Greater Stockholm (PACS) at GIH. For its overall aims, see: www.gih.se/pacs

    One of the aims is to characterize the physiological demands of walking and cycle commuting in relation to absolute and relative demands of oxygen uptake (VO2). This is of interest in itself for understanding the nature of the physical activity during active commuting. Combined with other kinds of data one aim was also to better understand the potential health effects of active commuting. An important issue in this respect was to scrutinize whether the heart rate method for estimating VO2 (Berggren & Hohwü Christensen 1950) would be a reliable and valid method during cycle or walking commuting.

    To reach these goals we needed to use an automated mobile metabolic system. However, we had to work for a much longer time than expected due to a surprising number of diverse methodological challenges in measurements of both VO2 and heart rate (HR). They had to be considered and evaluated through a series of validity studies and checks. Some of the issues could be foreseen and were rather straight forward to handle, whereas others were unexpected, and the strategies to handle them had to be developed step by step as they appeared during the research process. Here this process will be first introduced, then described in more or less detail, and in cases of less details, we instead refer to issues in more depth in original articles. Finally, a synthesis of all studies and their consequences is elaborated on at the end of this appendix.

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  • 25.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Can heart rate be used as an indicator of energy demands during commuter walking in a metropolitan area?2016Konferensbidrag (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Measuring the energetic demands of habitual commuter walking is essential to objectively relate to the impact that walking commuting can have on health. Hence, evaluating methods for such purpose is of great importance. Heart rate (HR) can possibly be used as long as the relationship between oxygen uptake (VO2) and HR is established in laboratory conditions and proven to be valid under field conditions. However, e.g. traffic, noise and exhaust fumes may introduce effects of e.g. stress that change the relationship in the field. Thus, the validity of the HR method needs to be scrutinized.

    Methods

    VO2 and HR measurements during three submaximal exercise intensities on cycle ergometer were performed in the laboratory, as well as during normal commuting walking in the individuals´ normal field setting in Greater Stockholm, Sweden. 20 habitual commuter pedestrians (10 males and 10 females) aged 45 ± 7 yrs (mean ± SD) participated and validated stationary and portable metabolic systems (Rosdahl et al. 2010; 2016; Salier-Eriksson et al. 2012), and HR monitors were used. A comparison of the VO2 – HR relationship was made between the laboratory and field conditions.

    Results and Discussion 

    Interpreting the heart rate levels during walking commuting from the VO2 – HR relationship in the laboratory resulted in oxygen uptakes that were 13.0 ± 10.6 % lower in males and 10.5 ± 11.5 % lower in females than the correct VO2 values. Thus, the study indicates that systematic differences between the laboratory and field conditions with respect to the VO2 – HR relationship are present in metropolitan conditions. The reason for these differences remains to be elucidated.

    References

    Rosdahl, H., Gullstrand, L., Salier Eriksson, J., Johansson, P. & Schantz, P. 2010. Evaluation of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system against the Douglas bag method. Eur J Appl Physiol 109 (2):159-71.

    Rosdahl, H., Salier Eriksson, J. & Schantz, P. 2016. Validation of data collected with mobile metabolic measurement systems over time during active commuting. Proceedings of the 21st Annual Congress of The European College of Sport Sciences, Vienna, Austria, 6-8 July (Abstract).

    Salier Eriksson, J., Rosdahl, H. & Schantz, P. 2012. Validity of the Oxycon Mobile metabolic system under field measuring conditions. Eur J Appl Physiol, 112 (1): 345-355.

  • 26.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Perspectives on exercise intensity, volume and energy expenditure in habitual cycle commuting2020Ingår i: Frontiers in Sports and Active Living, Section of Exercise Physiology, E-ISSN 2624-9367, Vol. 2, artikel-id 65Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Knowledge about exercise intensity and energy expenditure combined with trip frequency and duration is necessary for interpreting the character and potential influencing capacity of habitual cycle commuting on e.g. health outcomes. It needs to be investigated with validated methods, which is the purpose of this study.

     

    Methods. Ten male and ten female middle-aged habitual commuter cyclists were studied at rest and with maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer and a treadmill in the laboratory. During their normal commute in the Stockholm County, Sweden, their oxygen uptake, heart rate, energy expenditure, ventilation, blood lactate, rated perceived exertion, number of stops, durations, route distances and cycling velocities were monitored with validated methods. The frequency of trips was self-reported.

     

    Results. The relative exercise intensity was 65 % of maximal oxygen uptake, and the energy expenditure was 0.46 kcal per km and kg body weight for both sexes. Sex differences in MET-values (men, 8.7; women 7.4) mirrored higher levels of cycling speed (20 %), body weight (29 %), oxygen uptake (54 %) and ventilation (51 %) in men compared to women. The number of METhours per week during peak cycling season averaged 40 for the men and 28 for the women. It corresponded to a total energy expenditure of about 3500 and 1880 kcal for men and women, respectively. The number of trips per year was about 370, and the annual distance cycled was on average 3500 km for men and 2300 for women.

     

    Conclusion. Cycle commuting is characterized by equal relative aerobic intensity levels and energy requirements for a given distance cycled by men and women. Based on an overall evaluation, it represents a lower range within the vigorous intensity category. The combined levels of oxygen uptake, durations and trip frequencies lead to high levels of METhours and energy expenditure in both men and women during both peak cycling season as well as over the year. Overall, the study presents a novel basis for interpreting cycle commuting in relation to various health outcomes.

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  • 27.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    The heart rate method for estimating oxygen uptake: Analyses of reproducibility with heart rates from commuter walkingManuskript (preprint) (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 28.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    The Heart Rate Method for Estimating Oxygen Uptake: Analyses of Reproducibility Using a Range of Heart Rates from Cycle Commuting2019Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, nr 7, artikel-id e0219741Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Monitoring aerobic exercise intensities of free-living physical activities is valuable for purposes such as education and research. The heart rate (HR) method, based on the linear relation between HR and oxygen uptake (VO2), is potentially valuable for this purpose. Three prerequisites are that the method is reproducible, and valid for the specific form of physical activity executed as well as under field conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate reproducibility of the heart rate method in the laboratory.

     

    Methods. VO2 and HR measurements were made on two different occasions during three submaximal (model 1) plus a maximal exercise intensity (model 2) on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory. 19 habitual commuter cyclists (9 males and 10 females), aged 44 ± 3 years, were measured. The reproducibility of the estimated VO2, based on three levels of HR from commuting cycling and the regression equations from test and retest were analyzed. Differences between the two models were also studied. 

     

    Results. For both models, there were no significant differences between test and retest in the constituents of the regression equations (y-intercept, slope and r-value). Neither were there any systematic differences in estimated absolute levels of VO2 between test and retest. The relative differences between test and retest, based on estimations from three different levels of HR, were 0.99 ± 11.0 (n.s.), 2.67 ± 6.48 (n.s.) and 3.57 ± 6.24% (p<0.05) for model 1, and 1.09 ± 10.6, 1.75 ± 6.43 and 2.12 ± 5.92% (all n.s.) for model 2. However, some large individual differences were seen in both models. There were no significant differences between the two models in the slopes, intercepts or r-values of the regression equations or in the estimated levels of VO2.

     

    Conclusion. The heart rate method shows good reproducibility on the group level in estimating oxygen consumption from HR-VO2 relations in the laboratory, and based on three levels of HR which are representative for cycle commuting. However, on the individual level, some large variations were seen.

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  • 29.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    The physical work during cycling needs to be measured more accurately in studies of health effects: An explorative methodological study2020Ingår i: Konferensrapporten Transportforum 2020, 2020Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
  • 30.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    The heart rate method for estimating oxygen uptake: analyses of reproducibility using a range of heart rates from commuter walking2019Ingår i: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 119, nr 11-12, s. 2655-2671Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The heart rate method, based on the linear relation between heart rate and oxygen uptake, is potentially valuable to monitor intensity levels of physical activities. However, this depends not least on its reproducibility under standard conditions. This study aims therefore to evaluate the reproducibility of the heart rate method in the laboratory using a range of heart rates associated with walking commuting.

     

    Methods. On two different days, heart rate and oxygen uptake measurements were made during three submaximal (model 1) and a maximal exercise intensity (model 2) on a cycle ergometer in the laboratory. 14 habitual walking commuters participated. The reproducibility, based on the regression equations from test and retest and using three levels of heart rate from the walking commuting was analyzed. Differences between the two models were also analyzed. 

     

    Results. For both models, there were no significant differences between test and retest in the constituents of the regression equations (y-intercept, slope and r-value). Neither were there any systematic differences in estimated absolute levels of VO2 between test and retest for either model. However, some rather large individual differences were seen in both models. Furthermore, no significant differences were seen between the two models in slopes, intercepts and r-values of the regression equations or in the estimated VO2.

     

    Conclusion. The heart rate method shows good reproducibility on the group level in estimating oxygen consumption from heart rate – oxygen uptake relations in the laboratory, and based on three levels of heart rate which are representative for walking commuting. However, on the individual level, some large variations were seen.

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  • 31.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Stigell, Erik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Dang, Phung
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier-Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Kan fysiskt aktiv arbetspendling bli en "folkrörelse"?2006Ingår i: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, nr 3, s. 8-13Artikel i tidskrift (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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  • 32.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Wahlgren, Lina
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Nilsson Sommar, Johan
    Umeå Universitet.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Estimating duration-distance relations in cycle commuting in the general population2018Ingår i: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, nr 11, artikel-id e0207573Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to estimate the duration-distance relation in cycle commuting in the general  population since this enables analyses of the potential for various public health outcomes. Therefore, the aim is to estimate this relation in the Swedish adult population of 2015. For that purpose, the first step was to establish it for adult male and female cycle commuters in Greater Stockholm, Sweden. Whether or not the slopes of these relations needed to be altered in order to make them representative of the general population was evaluated by comparing the levels of maximal oxygen uptake in samples of commuter cyclists and the population. The measure used was the maximal oxygen uptake divided by both the body weight and a cycle weight of 18.5 kg. The body weights in the population samples were adjusted to mirror relevant levels in 2015. Age adjustments for the duration–distance relations were calculated on the basis of the maximal oxygen uptake in the population samples aged 20–65 years. The duration-distance relations of the cycle commuters were downscaled by about 24–28% to mirror levels in the general population. The empirical formula for the distance (D, km) was based on duration (T, minutes)  x  speed (km/min)  x  a correction factor from cycle commuter to the general population  x  age adjustment (A, years). For the males in the general population the formula was: D = T  x  20.76 km/h  x  0.719  x  (1.676 – 0.0147  x  A). For females, the  formula was: D = T  x  16.14 km/h  x  0.763  x  (1.604 – 0.0129  x  A). These formulas, combined with distributions of route distances between home and work in the population, enable realistic evaluations of the potential for different public health outcomes through cycle commuting.

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  • 33.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Wahlgren, Lina
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, Åstrandlaboratoriet, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Vilka folkhälsovinster kan erhållas vid olika scenarier av ökad cykling i en storstadsregion?: Empiri och fysisk arbetskapacitet som grund för beräkning av potentiell cykelpendling.2015Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vilka folkhälsovinster kan erhållas vid olika scenarier av ökad cykling i en storstadsregion?

    Syfte: Ur såväl transport- och miljö- som folkhälsoperspektiv är det värdefullt att utveckla kunskap om potentialen att överföra bilresor för arbetspendling till cykelresor. Det är också angeläget att belysa hur detta kan leda till ökade nivåer av fysisk aktivitet och förbättrad luftkvalité, samt att analysera vilka hälsokonsekvenser en förbättrad luftkvalité det kan medföra inom hela befolkningen inom en storstadsregion.  

    För detta krävs att vitt skilda kompetenser samverkar. Man behöver till exempel kombinera kunskap om resmönster och färdvägsavstånd för olika kön och ålder, med kunskap om arbetsfysiologisk kapacitet och cyklisters beteende samt hur luftkvaliteten ter sig, hur den kan ändras, och vilka konsekvenser det får.

    Genom ett unikt samarbete mellan Umeå Universitet, Stockholms Universitet, Stockholms miljöförvaltning, Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan samt konsultföretaget WSP har vitt skilda kompetenser sammanförts för att belysa dessa frågeställningar i ett integrativt forskningsprojekt med Stor-Stockholm som studieområde.  Projektet utvecklar dessutom även ny metodologisk kunskap som är av ett brett intresse för samhälls- och trafikplanering inom storstadsområden.

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  • 34.
    Schantz, Peter
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Wahlgren, Lina
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Salier-Eriksson, Jane
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Stigell, Erik
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Institutionen för idrotts- och hälsovetenskap, FoU-gruppen för rörelse, hälsa och miljö.
    Is Active Commuting the answer to Population Health?:  Lessons from the Stockholm Studies (PACS) – A Prologue.2010Ingår i: Proceedings from The 3rd International Congress on Physical Activity and Public Health, Toronto, Canada, 2010,, 2010, s. 35-Konferensbidrag (Övrigt vetenskapligt)
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