Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Danielsen, Yngvild
    et al.
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Júlíusson, Pétur
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Nordhus, Inger Hilde
    Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway.
    Kleiven, M
    University of Bergen, Norway.
    Meltzer, H M
    Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Kristiania (historical), Oslo County, Norway.
    Olsson, Sven Johan Gustav
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Pallesen, S.
    The relationship between life-style and cardio-metabolic risk indicators in children: the importance of screen time2011In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 100, no 2, p. 253-259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    To examine differences between children with obesity and normal weight children (aged 7-13 years) in terms of physical activity, screen time, food intake and blood parameters indicative of cardio-metabolic risk. Further, to explore the relationship between physical activity, screen time and food intake with cardio-metabolic parameters.

    METHODS:

    Forty-three children with obesity were compared with 43 normal weight peers. Physical activity was monitored by accelerometers and screen time and food intake by diaries. Blood parameters indicative of cardio-metabolic risk were analysed.

    RESULTS:

    The group of children with obesity had significantly less vigorous activity (p = 0.013), more daily screen time (p = 0.004) and consumed more fat (p = 0.04) than the group of normal weight children. The former group also demonstrated higher values of triglycerides (p = 0.001), HbA1c (p = 0.009), C-peptide (p = 0.001), had a higher HOMA-R score (p = 0.001), and lower levels of HDL (p = 0.001). After controlling for weight category, regression analyses revealed that screen time was significantly and positively related to the HOMA-R score and C-peptide levels independent of physical activity and intake of fat and sugar.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The results indicate that screen time is an important behavioural factor related to obesity and cardio-metabolic risk indicators in children.

  • 2.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Olsson, Gustav
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Bolan, Kate
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Kallings, Lena
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Svenskar rör sig för lite2015In: Svensk Idrottsforskning: Organ för Centrum för Idrottsforskning, ISSN 1103-4629, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 30-31Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För den som betraktar svenskarna som ett aktivt folk är det dags att tänka om. Bara sju procent av 50-65 åringarna är tillräckligt fysiskt aktiva, visar  resultat från den stora SCAPIS-studien.

  • 3.
    Ekblom-Bak, Elin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Olsson, Gustav
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Bergström, Göran
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    The Daily Movement Pattern and Fulfilment of Physical Activity Recommendations in Swedish Middle-Aged Adults: The SCAPIS Pilot Study.2015In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 10, no 5, article id e0126336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different aspects of the daily movement pattern-sitting, light intensity physical activity, and moderate- and vigorous intensity physical activity-have each independently been associated with health and longevity. Previous knowledge of the amount and distribution of these aspects in the general Swedish population, as well as the fulfilment rate of physical activity recommendations, mainly relies on self-reported data. More detailed data assessed with objective methods is needed. The aim of the study was to present descriptive data on the daily movement pattern in a middle-aged Swedish population assessed by hip-worn accelerometers. The cohort consisted of 948 participants (51% women), aged 50 to 64 years, from the Swedish CArdioPulmonary bioImage pilot Study. In the total sample, 60.5% of accelerometer wear time was spent sitting, 35.2% in light physical activity and 3.9% in moderate- and vigorous physical activity. Men and participants with high educational level spent a larger proportion of time sitting, compared to women and participants with low educational level. Men and participants with a high educational level spent more time, and the oldest age-group spent less time, in moderate- and vigorous physical activity. Only 7.1% of the study population met the current national physical activity recommendations, with no gender, age or education level differences. Assessment of all three components of the daily movement pattern is of high clinical relevance and should be included in future research. As the fulfilment of national physical activity recommendations is very low and sitting time is very high in our middle-aged population, the great challenge remains to enhance the implementation of methods to increase the level of physical activity in this population.

  • 4.
    Olsson, Gustav
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Kallings, Lena
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology. Göteborgs Universitet.
    Is the relationship between self-perceived physical health and measured physical fitness robust over time and between genders?Manuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Olsson, Sven Johan Gustav
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Baksidan av myntet - inaktiviteten: Ny avhandling: Studies of physical activity in the Swedish population2016In: Idrottsmedicin, ISSN 2001-3302, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 27-29Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sammanfattning av Olssons avhandling

  • 6.
    Olsson, Sven Johan Gustav
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Studies of physical activity in the Swedish population2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Cheap and effective tools for measuring patients’ physical activity (PA) level are needed. The first aim in this thesis was therefore to assess the validity of two PA -questions, and their three associated answer modes, that are used within the Swedish health care system. Sitting, light intensity PA (LIPA), and moderate and vigorous intensity PA (MVPA), are associated with health and longevity, but detailed population data assessed with objective methods is needed. The second aim was thus to assess the above with motion sensor technology, in a middle-aged Swedish sample. Low self-perceived health is a strong predictor of morbidity and mortality, but this association may vary over time with changes in the society and our lifestyle. The third aim was to assess secular trends in the interrelations between self-perceived health, physical fitness, and selected covariates. The effects of PA on prescription (PAP) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in overweight adults are unclear, thus the fourth aim was to explore this.

    Methods: All data was collected in the Swedish population. Data from the PA -questions and accelerometers, aerobic fitness, counter movement jump, and balance tests, blood samples, and self-rated general health were collected in 365 participants, 21–66 yrs. The PA pattern was assessed in 948 individuals, 50‒64 yrs, from the SCAPIS pilot study. Self-perceived physical health, and measured aerobic fitness, counter movement jump height, and balance, and demographic and lifestyle data, was assessed in three independent samples from 1990, 2000 and 2013, including 3564 adults, 20‒65 yrs. The effects of Swedish PAP on HRQoL was assessed in a randomized controlled trial including 101 men and women, 67‒68 yrs, that were inactive, overweight (BMI>25 kg/m2), and had a waist circumference ≥102 cm (men) or ≥88 cm (women), who were randomized to an intervention group or a control group. The 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) was used to assess HRQoL.

    Results: The multiple choice answer mode of the two PA -questions was found to have the strongest validity, compared with the two other (an open mode, and one where PA minutes is specified per weekday). The validity is in line with many other established PA-questionnaires, but the open mode has limitations. The assessment of PA pattern showed that 61% of motion sensor wear time represented sitting, 35% LIPA, and 4% MVPA. Only 7% of the sample met the PA recommendations. The odds for describing perceived health as good was found to increase by 5% per each increment of 1 ml/kg/min in VO2max. This was stable across genders and all three LIV-samples (i.e. over time). Waist circumference, chronic disease, sleep problems, and level of satisfaction with one’s life, were also important correlates. The Swedish PAP group improved significantly more, and more participants displayed clinically relevant improvements (OR 2.43), in mental aspects of HRQoL, compared to the controls. Physical aspects of HRQoL improved in the PAP group, but not in the control group.

    Conclusions: The multiple choice answer mode has the strongest validity and Open mode the weakest. The PA -questions may be used in populations, or in individuals to determine appropriateness for treatment. The questions’ advantages and limitations must be considered and further reliability and validity studies are needed. The results regarding sitting, LIPA, MVPA and fulfillment of PA recommendations, are of high clinical relevance. A great challenge remains to further implement methods to increase the level of PA in the Swedish population. Physical fitness is related to self-perceived health independently of changes in society and lifestyle over time, and simple questions may be useful for the clinical assessment of physical fitness. Swedish PAP has a positive effect on mental aspects of HRQoL, measured by the SF-36. This finding supports the clinical use of the Swedish PAP model.

  • 7.
    Olsson, Sven Johan Gustav
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom Bak, Elin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Hemmingsson, Erik
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hellénius, Mai-Lis
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Kallings, Lena
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Effects of the Swedish physical activity on prescription model on health-related quality of life in overweight older adults: a randomised controlled trial2015In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 687Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The effects of physical activity on prescription (PAP) on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in overweight adults are unclear. We therefore aimed to explore the effects of the Swedish PAP model on HRQoL in overweight older adults.

    Methods

    Participants were recruited from a cohort of men and women born between 1937 and 1938, and living in Stockholm County. Inclusion criteria were; insufficiently physically active, i.e. <30 min of at least moderate intensity physical activity (PA) per day; body mass index >25 kg/m 2 ; and waist circumference ≥102 cm (men) or ≥88 cm (women). Altogether, 101 individuals, aged 67 years, were randomly assigned to two parallel groups: intervention group (n = 47) receiving individualised PAP or control group (n = 54). The 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) was administered before and after the six months intervention. Main outcomes were the SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) and mental component summary (MCS) scores. Intention to treat analysis was utilised. Regression analysis was performed to assess whether changes in PA and body weight affected changes in HRQoL.

    Results

    At the six months follow-up, regarding the MCS score, the intervention group had improved significantly more (median: 4.4 [interquartile range (IQR): −2.4 to 23.3]) vs (median: 0.0 [IQR: −4.0 to 4.9]); p < 0.05) and a higher proportion of participants had attained relevant improvements (OR 2.43 (95 % CI 1.00–5.88) p < 0.05) compared to the controls. A within group improvement in the PCS score (median: 3.8 [IQR: −1.9 to 19.5] p < 0.05) was found in the intervention group. Changes in PA and body weight had a small, but significant, mediating effect on the changes in HRQoL.

    Conclusions

    PAP had a positive effect on HRQoL, measured by the SF-36 MCS, but no significant between group effect was seen on the PCS in overweight older adults. These effects were, to some extent, mediated by changes in PA and body weight. Our findings support clinical use of the Swedish PAP model.

    Trial registration

    ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02320760.

  • 8.
    Olsson, Sven Johan Gustav
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Andersson, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group. Department of Medicine, Unit of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Solna.
    Kallings, Lena
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Categorical answer modes provides superior validity to open answers when asking for level of physical activity: A cross-sectional study2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 70-76, article id 1403494815602830Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS:

    Physical activity (PA) used as prevention and treatment of disease has created a need for effective tools for measuring patients' PA level. Our aim was therefore to assess the validity of two PA questions and their three associated answer modes.

    METHODS:

    Data on PA according to the PA questions and Actigraph GT3X+ accelerometers, aerobic fitness (VO2max), cardiovascular biomarkers, and self-rated general health were collected in 365 Swedish adults (21-66 years). The PA questions ask about weekly PA via categories (Categorical), an open-ended answer (Open), or specified day by day (Table).

    RESULTS:

    The Categorical mode, compared with the Open mode, correlated (Spearman's rho) significantly more strongly (p<0.05) with accelerometer PA (0.31 vs. 0.18) and VO2max (0.27 vs. 0.06), and the level of BMI (-0.20 vs. -0.02), waist circumference (-0.22 vs. -0.03), diastolic blood pressure (-0.16 vs. 0.08), glucose (-0.18 vs. 0.04), triglycerides (-0.31 vs. -0.07), and general health (0.35 vs. 0.19). The validity of the Categorical and Table modes were similar regarding VO2max and accelerometry, but the Categorical mode exhibited more significant and stronger correlations with cardiovascular biomarkers. The capacity of the PA questions to identify insufficiently physically active individuals ranged from 0.57 to 0.76 for sensitivity and from 0.47 to 0.79 for specificity.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    The Categorical mode exhibits the strongest validity and Open mode the weakest. The PA questions may be used on a population level, or as a tool for determining patents' appropriateness for treatment.

  • 9.
    Olsson, Sven Johan Gustav
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom-Bak, Elin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Kallings, Lena V
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom, Örjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology. Göteborg University.
    Association of perceived physical health and physical fitness in two Swedish national samples from 1990 and 2015.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 717-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Perceived health and physical fitness have been shown to correlate, and low levels of either variable increase the risk for future illness and mortality. However, risk factors and their interrelationship may vary between societies and over time. In this study, the associations of physical fitness and perceived health were therefore assessed in two Swedish national samples 25 years apart.

    METHODS: Perceived physical health, dichotomized as "good" or "bad", maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max), counter movement jump (CMJ), balance (one-legged 60 second stance), and self-reported demographics and lifestyle were recorded in two cross-sectional samples (sample size, number of eligible participants) of Swedish adults, aged 20 - 65 years, in 1990 - 1991 (2203, 1365), and 2013 - 2015 (3357, 422).

    RESULTS: The odds for good perceived physical health increased by 5% per mL · kg(-1) · min(-1) of VO2 max, 3% per cm CMJ height, and decreased by 4% per 1 time of overbalancing, in both samples. Mutually adjusted regression models showed that perceived physical health was best predicted by VO2 max and chronic illness in 1990 and by age, BMI, and educational level in 2015.

    CONCLUSION: Perceived physical health was related to physical fitness in two samples of Swedish adults from 1990 and 2015. However, multivariate, and mutually adjusted models, indicate that the most important covariates of perceived physical health may have changed from VO2 max and chronic illness in 1990, to age, BMI, and educational level in 2015. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf