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  • 1.
    Bø, Kari
    et al.
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Artal, Raul
    St Louis Univ, Dept Obstet Gynecol & Womens Hlth, St Louis, MO 63103 USA..
    Barakat, Ruben
    Univ Politecn Madrid, Fac Ciencias Actividad Fis & Deporte INEF, Madrid, Spain..
    Brown, Wendy
    Univ Queensland, Sch Human Movement & Nutr Sci, Ctr Res Exercise, St Lucia, Qld, Australia..
    Davies, Gregory A. L.
    Queens Univ, Dept Maternal Fetal Med, Kingston, ON, Canada..
    Dooley, Michael
    King Edward VII Hosp London, Poundbury Clin Dorchester Poundbury Suite, London, England..
    Evenson, Kelly R.
    Univ N Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC USA.;Gillings Sch Global Publ Hlth, Dept Epidemiol, Chapel Hill, NC USA..
    Haakstad, Lene A. H.
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Dept Sport Sci, N-0806 Oslo, Norway..
    Henriksson-Larsen, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Kayser, Bengt
    Univ Lausanne, Inst Sports Sci, Fac Biol & Med, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Kinnunen, Tarja I.
    Univ Tampere, Sch Hlth Sci, FIN-33101 Tampere, Finland.;Natl Inst Hlth & Welf, Dept Children Young People & Families, Helsinki, Finland..
    Mottola, Michelle F.
    Univ Western Ontario, R Samuel McLaughlin Fdn, Exercise & Pregnancy Lab, London, ON, Canada..
    Nygaard, Ingrid
    Univ Utah, Dept Obstet & Gynecol, Salt Lake City, UT USA..
    van Poppel, Mireille
    Graz Univ, Inst Sport Sci, Graz, Austria..
    Stuge, Britt
    Oslo Univ Hosp, N-0450 Oslo, Norway..
    Khan, Karim M.
    Univ British Columbia, Dept Family Practice, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada.;Univ British Columbia, Ctr Hip Hlth & Mobil, Vancouver, BC V5Z 1M9, Canada..
    Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016 evidence summary from the IOC expert group meeting, Lausanne. Part 1-exercise in women planning pregnancy and those who are pregnant2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 10, p. 571-589Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2. Bø, Kari
    et al.
    Artal, Raul
    Barakat, Ruben
    Brown, Wendy
    Dooley, Michael
    Evenson, Kelly R
    Haakstad, Lene A H
    Larsen, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Kayser, Bengt
    Kinnunen, Tarja I
    Mottola, Michelle F
    Nygaard, Ingrid
    van Poppel, Mireille
    Stuge, Britt
    Davies, Gregory A L
    Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016 evidence summary from the IOC expert group meeting, Lausanne. Part 2-the effect of exercise on the fetus, labour and birth.2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 21, p. 1297-1305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is Part 2 of 5 in the series of evidence statements from the IOC expert committee on exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes. Part 1 focused on the effects of training during pregnancy and on the management of common pregnancy-related symptoms experienced by athletes. In Part 2, we focus on maternal and fetal perinatal outcomes.

  • 3.
    Bø, Kari
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Artal, Raul
    St Louis University, St Louis, Missouri, USA..
    Barakat, Ruben
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain..
    Brown, Wendy J
    University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland, Australia..
    Davies, Gregory A L
    Queens University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada..
    Dooley, Michael
    King Edward VII Hospital, London, UK..
    Evenson, Kelly R
    University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA..
    Haakstad, Lene A H
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway..
    Kayser, Bengt
    University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland..
    Kinnunen, Tarja I
    University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland..
    Larsen, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden..
    Mottola, Michelle F
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada..
    Nygaard, Ingrid
    University of Utah, Utah, Salt Lake City, USA..
    van Poppel, Mireille
    University of Graz, Graz, Austria..
    Stuge, Britt
    Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway..
    Khan, Karim M
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada..
    Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016/2017 evidence summary from the IOC expert group meeting, Lausanne. Part 5. Recommendations for health professionals and active women.2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 17, p. 1080-1085, article id bjsports-2018-099351Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Bø, Kari
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences.
    Artal, Raul
    Barakat, Ruben
    Brown, Wendy J
    Davies, Gregory A L
    Dooley, Michael
    Evenson, Kelly R
    Haakstad, Lene A H
    Kayser, Bengt
    Kinnunen, Tarja I
    Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Mottola, Michelle F
    Nygaard, Ingrid
    van Poppel, Mireille
    Stuge, Britt
    Khan, Karim M
    Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016/17 evidence summary from the IOC Expert Group Meeting, Lausanne. Part 3-exercise in the postpartum period.2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 21, p. 1516-1525, article id bjsports-2017-097964Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Bø, Kari
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway.
    Artal, Raul
    Saint Louis University, St Louis, Missouri, USA.
    Barakat, Ruben
    Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
    Brown, Wendy J
    University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
    Davies, Gregory A L
    Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada.
    Dooley, Mike
    King Edward VII Hospital, London, UK.
    Evenson, Kelly R
    Gillings School of Global Public Health, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, USA..
    Haakstad, Lene A H
    Norwegian School of Sport Science, Oslo, Norway.
    Kayser, Bengt
    University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Kinnunen, Tarja I
    University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
    Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Mottola, Michelle F
    University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada.
    Nygaard, Ingrid
    University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA.
    van Poppel, Mireille
    University of Graz, Graz, Austria.
    Stuge, Britt
    Oslo University Hospital, Ullevål, Oslo, Norway.
    Khan, Karim M
    University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Exercise and pregnancy in recreational and elite athletes: 2016/17 evidence summary from the IOC expert group meeting, Lausanne. Part 4-Recommendations for future research.2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, p. 1724-1726, article id bjsports-2017-098387Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6. Gilenstam, Kajsa M
    et al.
    Thorsen, Kim
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin B
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Physiological correlates of skating performance in women's and men's ice hockey.2011In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 2133-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current investigation was to identify relationships between physiological off-ice tests and on-ice performance in female and male ice hockey players on a comparable competitive level. Eleven women, 24 ± 3.0 years, and 10 male ice hockey players, 23 ± 2.4 years, were tested for background variables: height, body weight (BW), ice hockey history, and lean body mass (LBM) and peak torque (PT) of the thigh muscles, VO2peak and aerobic performance (Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation [OBLA], respiratory exchange ratio [RER1]) during an incremental bicycle ergometer test. Four different on-ice tests were used to measure ice skating performance. For women, skating time was positively correlated (p < 0.05) to BW and negatively correlated to LBM%, PT/BW, OBLA, RER 1, and VO2peak (ml O2·kg(-1) BW(-1)·min(-1)) in the Speed test. Acceleration test was positively correlated to BW and negatively correlated to OBLA and RER 1. For men, correlation analysis revealed only 1 significant correlation where skating time was positively correlated to VO2peak (L O2·min(-1)) in the Acceleration test. The male group had significantly higher physiological test values in all variables (absolute and relative to BW) but not in relation to LBM. Selected off-ice tests predict skating performance for women but not for men. The group of women was significantly smaller and had a lower physiological performance than the group of men and were slower in the on-ice performance tests. However, gender differences in off-ice variables were reduced or disappeared when values were related to LBM, indicating a similar capacity of producing strength and aerobic power in female and male hockey players. Skating performance in female hockey players may be improved by increasing thigh muscle strength, oxygen uptake, and relative muscle mass.

  • 7.
    Sundell, Carl Göran
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Jonsson, H
    Akademiska sjukhuset, Uppsala.
    Ådin, L
    Diagnostic Radiology, Skellefteå.
    Larsen, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. Umeå universitet.
    Stress Fractures of Pars Interarticularis in Adolescent Athletes a Classification System with MRI and CT Enabling Evaluation of The Healing Process2018In: Journal of Exercise, Sports & Orthopedics, E-ISSN 2374-6904, Vol. 5, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to evaluate healing frequency in different stages of stress reactions in the Pars Interarticularis (PI) using a classification system with MRI and CT. The intervention was 3-month rest from physical activity, without a brace, with the exception of activities of daily living.

    Materials & Method: Twelve adolescent athletes with different stages of Spondolysis were included in the study. They had pathology in the Pars Interarticularis and were clinically examined with MRI and CT 3-6 weeks after debut of Low Back Pain (LBP) and re-evaluated after 3 months intervention with rest from physical activity.

    Results: A combination of MRI and CT scanning to investigate suspected injuries to Pars Interarticularis in adolescent athletes revealed 6 different stages of Spondolysis that ranged from marrow oedema to pseudoarthrosis. After 3 months of rest from physical activity the early stages of Pars Interarticularis injuries healed significantly better than the later stages with rest from physical activity.

    Conclusion: The combination of MRI and CT revealed 6 stages of stress reactions instead of 4 as in Hollenberg's staging with MRI only. In the 3 earliest stages, of these 6, rest from physical activity for 3 months can heal the stress reaction.

  • 8. Sundell, C-G
    et al.
    Jonsson, H
    Adin, L
    Henriksson Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Clinical Examination, Spondylolysis and Adolescent Athletes.2013In: International Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0172-4622, E-ISSN 1439-3964, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 263-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Symptomatic spondylolysis is a stress reaction caused by microtrauma during physical exercise, an imaging diagnostic subgroup of Adolescent Low Back Pain (ALBP), found in adolescent athletes. Early diagnosis increases the possibility of healing. Thus, it is important to divide ALBP into subgroups. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical tests that can distinguish symptomatic spondylolysis from other forms of ALBP in order to facilitate early referral for diagnostic imaging. The investigation subjects were a prospective case series with a control group, 25 subjects with ALBP and 13 subjects that had no history of LBP. The 2 groups were examined using the same clinical protocol. MRI of the whole lumbar spine was performed in both the case and control groups and CT investigations of the L4 and L5 vertebrae were performed in the case group. Significant differences between the 2 groups were found in 8 of our clinical tests. No clinical test, alone or in combination, could distinguish between spondylolysis and other forms of ALBP. As 88% of the subjects in the case group had MRI findings and almost 50% had spondylolysis, MRI should be performed at an early age in young athletes with ALBP.

  • 9.
    Sundell, Claes-Göran
    et al.
    Umeå university.
    Ådin, Lars
    Piteå hospital.
    Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Physical Examination and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Stress-Related Bone Injuries in Tuber Ischiadicum2017In: Journal of Exercise, Sports & Orthopedics, ISSN 2374-6904, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 1-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Stress-Related Bone Injuries (SRBI) in the Tuber Ischiadicum (TI) is a possible preliminary diagnosis in adolescent athletes with pain in the pelvic region or in the back of the thigh. The condition requires an early diagnosis in order to heal properly. We describe five cases of young athletes seeking a physiotherapist for pelvic or back thigh pain.

    Materials and methods: Five patients previously diagnosed with lower back pain, groin pain, pelvic or back thigh pain underwent a Physical Examination (PE) by a physiotherapist to identify the pathogenesis of the pain. The PE led to the preliminary diagnosis of SRBI in the TI, which was confirmed by an MRI. The patients were treated with rest and Personally Guided Rehabilitation (PGR).

    Results : All cases had a positive eccentric hip extension test and pain provocation on palpation on the TI. MRI found different levels of stress reactions/fractures in the enthesis of the TI. After rest and rehabilitation, all subjects returned to their previous level of physical activity.

    Conclusion: PE appeared to identify adolescent athlete patients with SRBI in the TI requiring an MRI. The correct diagnosis led to a quick return to the previous level of physical activity.

    Clinical relevance: An early and correct diagnosis thru a thorough PE can lead to complete healing and a return to sports.

  • 10.
    Wichardt, Emma
    et al.
    Idrottsmedicin, Umeå universitet.
    Mattsson, C. Mikael
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Rhabdomyolysis/myoglobinemia and NSAID during 48-hours ultra-endurance exercise (adventure racing)2011In: European Journal of Applied Physiology, ISSN 1439-6319, E-ISSN 1439-6327, Vol. 111, no 7, p. 1541-1544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To determine if rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinemia exists during a 48+ hour adventure race and if there is a correlation with NSAID use, race time and perceived pain or exertion. Method: Blood samples for analyses of myoglobin (Mb) were collected, and perception of exertion and pain registered on the Borg-RPE and CR scales, from 20 subjects (3 female, 17 male) Pre, Mid and Post race. Subjects were asked about NSAID use at each sampling and within 12 hours pre race. Result: A significant rise in Mb was observed throughout the race, with the NSAID group (n=6) having significantly lower Mb-Post than the no-NSAID group (n=14). High Mb-Pre and Post correlated to shorter race time and high Mb-Pre to lower Pain-Post. Race time also correlated to NSAID use, with the NSAID group having significantly longer race time than the no-NSAID group. Conclusion: Rhabdomyolysis with myoglobinemia, which might be reduced with NSAID use, exists during a 48+ hour adventure race. Indications that high Mb-levels correlate with shorter race time and less pain, and the reasons for the NSAID groups longer race time, need further investigation.

  • 11. Wikström-Frisén, L
    et al.
    Boraxbekk, C J
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Effects on power, strength and lean body mass of menstrual/oral contraceptive cycle based resistance training.2017In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, ISSN 0022-4707, E-ISSN 1827-1928, Vol. 57, no 1-2, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of menstrual and oral contraceptive cycle based high frequency periodized leg resistance training in trained women, on squat and countermovement jump, isokinetic peak torque and lean body mass in a non- laboratory setting.

    METHODS: Two groups performed high frequency leg resistance training for two weeks of each menstrual/oral contraceptive cycle for four months. The remaining part of the cycle they performed the leg training once a week. Group 1 (n=19) trained with high frequency (5 times∙w-1) during the first two weeks of each cycle, and group 2 (n=19) during the last two weeks of each cycle. A control group (n=21) performed regurlar (3 times∙w-1) leg resistance training for four months.

    RESULTS: Significant increase in squat and countermovement jump, and peak torque values in hamstrings for group 1 were observed, but not in group 2. In the control group an increase in squat and countermovement jump, and peak torque (only left hamstring) was also observed. There was also a significant increase in lean body mass of the legs in group 1 only. There were no evident differences in the training effects between women with or without oral contraceptive.

    CONCLUSION: The high frequency periodized leg resistance training during the first two weeks of the menstrual cycle is more beneficial to optimize training, than the last two weeks. Resistance training during the first two weeks of the menstrual cycle even resulted in a larger gain of lean body mass than regular training.

  • 12.
    Wikström-Frisén, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Boraxbekk, Carl J
    Umeå universitet.
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH. Umeå universitet.
    Increasing training load without risking the female athlete triad: menstrual cycle based periodized training may be an answer?2017In: Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, ISSN 0022-4707, E-ISSN 1827-1928, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 1519-1525Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: An improved muscle strength are of great importance in many sports, hence an increased understanding on how to generate optimal strength training programs in women without negative side effects that may lead to the female athlete triad are essential. The purpose of this study was to investigate potential negative effects of high frequency periodized menstrual/OC cycle based leg resistance training on components in the female athlete triad.

    METHODS: Fifty-nine women, with experience of resistance training and with regular menstrual/OC cycles were included in the analyses. The participants were randomly assigned a training program consisted of high frequency leg resistance training, periodized to the first two weeks (group 1) or the last two weeks (group 2) of each cycle, or to a control group performing regular training, during four consecutive menstrual/OC cycles. The main analysis was the pre-to-post change of sex and growth hormones, cortisol, total body fat mass, bone mineral density in the spine. We further examined the participants' own experience of the training programs.

    RESULTS: No significant negative impact on sex and growth hormones, cortisol, total body fat mass and bone mineral density in the spine, was detected in any of the groups. Moreover, the women in group 1 experienced their training program as positive.

    CONCLUSIONS: The high frequency periodized leg resistance training was not associated with exercise-related negative consequences on components in the female athlete triad. Moreover, the training was well accepted when performed during the first two weeks of each cycle.

  • 13.
    Wikström-Frisén, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Periodisering av träning under menstruationscykeln2017In: Idrottsmedicin : Svensk förening för fysisk aktivitet och idrottsmedicin, ISSN 2001-3302, no 3, p. 12-15Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kroppens variationer under menstruationscykeln är en central del av kvinnors vardag och därför behöver vi bli bättre på att ta hänsyn till detta när vi optimerar träning för idrottande kvinnor.

  • 14.
    Wikström-Frisén, Lisbeth
    et al.
    Umeå universitet.
    Nordström, Anna
    Umeå universitet.
    Mincheva-Nilsson, Lucia
    Umeå universitet.
    Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Impact of Season and Oral Contraceptive use on Cortisol Levelsin Physically Active Women2016In: Journal of Exercise, Sports & Orthopedics, ISSN 2374-6904, Vol. 3, no 2, article id 50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When athletes optimize their physical performance, an imbalance could occur between the strain of training, time for recovery and the athlete’s individual tolerance of stress that could lead to overreaching and overtraining syndrome. Cortisol has been suggested to be a biological, diagnostic marker to detect overreaching and overtraining syndrome, since it is thought to indicate stress. This study aimed to provide normative data on cortisol levels, hence investigate seasonality and impact of oral contraceptive use to elucidate if cortisol could be used as a diagnostic marker to detect overreaching and overtraining syndrome in female athletes. The women, divided in two groups, oral contraceptive users (n = 15) and non-users (n = 18), were followed over a nine-month period with monthly blood sampling for cortisol testing and a Profile of Mood State questionnaire (POMS) as a subjective measure of overreaching and overtraining syndrome.Findings indicated seasonal variations in cortisol levels, with different pattern in oral contraceptive users to non-users and moreover, higher cortisol levels in users to nonusers irrespective of season. No differences in seasonal variation in Global POMS score within the groups and no differences in Global POMS score between the groups were detected. Due to seasonality, impact of oral contraceptive use on cortisol levels, methodological considerations and standardization, as well as due to no convincing relationship to Global POMS score, cortisol is not suggested to be an optimal biological, diagnostic marker to detect overreaching and overtraining syndrome in physically active women.

  • 15.
    Åman, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Forssblad, M
    Karolinska institutet.
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Incidence and severity of reported acute sports injuries in 35 sports using insurance registry data2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 451-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acute injuries in sport are still a problem where limited knowledge of incidence and severity in different sports at national level exists. In Sweden, 80% of the sports federations have their mandatory injury insurance for all athletes in the same insurance company and injury data are systematically kept in a national database. The aim of the study was to identify high-risk sports with respect to incidence of acute and severe injuries in 35 sports reported to the database. The number and incidences of injuries as well as injuries leading to permanent medical impairment (PMI) were calculated during 2008–2011. Each year approximately 12 000 injuries and 1 162 660 licensed athletes were eligible for analysis. Eighty-five percent of the injuries were reported in football, ice hockey, floorball, and handball. The highest injury incidence as well as PMI was in motorcycle, handball, skating, and ice hockey. Females had higher risk of a PMI compared with males in automobile sport, handball, floorball, and football. High-risk sports with numerous injuries and high incidence of PMI injuries were motorcycle, handball, ice hockey, football, floorball, and automobile sports. Thus, these sports ought to be the target of preventive actions at national level.

  • 16.
    Åman, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Forssblad, M
    Karolinska institutet.
    Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Incidence and body location of reported acute sport injuries in seven sports using a national insurance database.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1147-1158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sports with high numbers of athletes and acute injuries are an important target for preventive actions at a national level. Both for the health of the athlete and to reduce costs associated with injury. The aim of this study was to identify injuries where injury prevention should focus, in order to have major impact on decreasing acute injury rates at a national level. All athletes in the seven investigated sport federations (automobile sports, basketball, floorball, football (soccer), handball, ice hockey, and motor sports) were insured by the same insurance company. Using this insurance database, the incidence and proportion of acute injuries, and injuries leading to permanent medical impairment (PMI), at each body location, was calculated. Comparisons were made between sports, sex, and age. In total, there were 84 754 registered injuries during the study period (year 2006-2013). Athletes in team sports, except in male ice hockey, had the highest risk to sustain an injury and PMI in the lower limb. Females had higher risk of injury and PMI in the lower limb compared to males, in all sports except in ice hockey. This study recommends that injury prevention at national level should particularly focus on lower limb injuries. In ice hockey and motor sports, head/neck and upper limb injuries also need attention.

  • 17.
    Åman, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Forssblad, Magnus
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Insurance claims data: a possible solution for a national sports injury surveillance system? An evaluation of data information against ASIDD and consensus statements on sports injury surveillance.2014In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 4, no 6, p. e005056-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Before preventive actions can be suggested for sports injuries at the national level, a solid surveillance system is required in order to study their epidemiology, risk factors and mechanisms. There are guidelines for sports injury data collection and classifications in the literature for that purpose. In Sweden, 90% of all athletes (57/70 sports federations) are insured with the same insurance company and data from their database could be a foundation for studies on acute sports injuries at the national level.

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the usefulness of sports injury insurance claims data in sports injury surveillance at the national level.

    METHOD: A database with 27 947 injuries was exported to an Excel file. Access to the corresponding text files was also obtained. Data were reviewed on available information, missing information and dropouts. Comparison with ASIDD (Australian Sports Injury Data Dictionary) and existing consensus statements in the literature (football (soccer), rugby union, tennis, cricket and thoroughbred horse racing) was performed in a structured manner.

    RESULT: Comparison with ASIDD showed that 93% of the suggested data items were present in the database to at least some extent. Compliance with the consensus statements was generally high (13/18). Almost all claims (83%) contained text information concerning the injury.

    CONCLUSIONS: Relatively high-quality sports injury data can be obtained from a specific insurance company at the national level in Sweden. The database has the potential to be a solid base for research on acute sports injuries in different sports at the national level.

  • 18.
    Åman, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Henriksson-Larsen, Karin
    Umeå University.
    Forssblad, Magnus
    Karolinska institutet.
    Näsmark, Annica
    Capio Artro Clinic, Stockholm.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University.
    A Nationwide Follow-up Survey on the Effectiveness of an Implemented Neuromuscular Training Program to Reduce Acute Knee Injuries in Soccer Players2018In: The Orthopaedic Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 2325-9671, Vol. 6, no 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A cruciate ligament (CL) injury is a severe injury in soccer. Neuromuscular training programs have a well-documented preventive effect, but there are few studies on the effectiveness of such a program at a national level. The Swedish Knee Control Program (KCP) was found to be effective in preventing CL injuries in youth female soccer players. The KCP was implemented nationwide in Sweden in 2010.

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of the Swedish KCP in reducing acute knee injuries in soccer players at a nationwide level.

    Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study.

    Methods: All licensed soccer players in Sweden are covered by the same insurance company. Using this insurance database, around 17,500 acute knee injuries that were reported to the insurance company between 2006 and 2015 were included in the study. By matching the number of licensed soccer players with the number of reported injuries each year, the annual incidence of knee and CL injuries was able to be calculated. To evaluate the spread of the KCP nationally, a questionnaire was sent to all 24 Swedish district football associations (FAs) with questions regarding KCP education. The number of downloads of the KCP mobile application (app) was obtained.

    Results: The incidence of CL injuries decreased during the study period for both male (from 2.9 to 2.4 per 1000 player-years) and female players (from 4.9 to 3.9 per 1000 player-years). The overall incidence of knee injuries decreased in both male (from 5.6 to 4.6 per 1000 player-years) and female players (from 8.7 to 6.4 per 1000 player-years). Comparing before and after the nationwide implementation of the KCP, there was a decrease in the incidence of CL injuries by 6% (rate ratio [RR], 0.94 [95% CI, 0.89-0.98]) in male players and 13% (RR, 0.87 [95% CI, 0.81-0.92]) in female players and a decrease in the incidence of knee injuries by 8% (RR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.89-0.96]) and 21% (RR, 0.79 [95% CI, 0.75-0.83]), respectively (P < .01 for all). This trend corresponded to a reduction of approximately 100 CL injuries each year in Sweden. A total of 21 of 24 district FAs held organized KCP educational courses during the study period. The percentage of district FAs holding KCP courses was between 46% and 79% each year. There were 101,236 downloads of the KCP app.

    Conclusion: The KCP can be considered partially implemented nationwide, and the incidence of knee and CL injuries has decreased in both sexes at a nationwide level.

  • 19.
    Åman, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Larsen, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Forssblad, Magnus
    Karolinska institutet.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköpings universitet.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköpings universitet.
    A NATIONWIDE FOLLOW-UP ON THE EFFECTIVENESS OF AN IMPLEMENTED NEUROMUSCULAR TRAINING PROGRAM TO REDUCE SEVERE KNEE INJURIES IN FOOTBALL PLAYERS2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, vol. 52, suppl. 1, abstr 18, 2018, Vol. 2, p. A7-Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Åman, Malin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Larsén, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Forssblad, M
    Karolinska institutet.
    Näsmark, A
    Waldén, M
    Hägglund, M
    A nationwide follow-up survey on the effectiveness of an implemented neuromuscular training program to reduce severe knee injuries in football playersManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
1 - 20 of 20
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