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  • 1.
    Aggerholm, K.
    et al.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Norway.
    Standal, O.
    Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Norway.
    Barker, D. M.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    On practising in physical education: outline for a pedagogical model.2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 197-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Models-based approaches to physical education have in recent years developed as a way for teachers and students to concentrate on a manageable number of learning objectives, and align pedagogical approaches with learning subject matter and context. This paper draws on Hannah Arendt’s account ofvita activato map existing approaches to physical education as oriented towards: (a) health and exercise, (b) sport and games, and (c) experience and exploration.

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to outline a new pedagogical model for physical education:a practising model. We argue that the form of human activity related to practising is not well represented in existing orientations and models. To sustain this argument, we highlight the most central aspects of practising, and at the same time describe central features of the model.

    Relevance and implications: The paper addresses pedagogical implications the practising model has for physical education teachers. Central learning outcomes and teaching strategies related to four essential and ‘non-negotiable’ features of the practising model are discussed. These strategies are: (1) acknowledging subjectivity and providing meaningful challenges, (2) focusing on content and the aims of practising, (3) specifying and negotiating standards of excellence and (4) providing adequate time to practising.

    Conclusion: The practising model has the potential to inform new perspectives on pedagogical approaches, and renew and improve working methods and learning practices, in physical education. 

  • 2.
    Almqvist, Jonas
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Öhman, Marie
    Örebro universitet.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    How Wii Teach Physical Education and Health2016In: SAGE Open, ISSN 2158-2440, E-ISSN 2158-2440, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of educational computer games in physical education (PE) has become more popular in recent years and has attracted research interest. The aim of the article is to investigate how physical activities and images of the human body are offered by the game. The results show how the “teacher” constituted in the games is one who instructs and encourages the players to exercise and think about their bodies, but not a “teacher” who can help students to investigate, argue, or discuss images of health and the human body. We argue that the use of a wide range and variety of ways of teaching would make the teaching richer and offer a deeper understanding about the body and health.

  • 3.
    Backman, Erik
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Content knowledge or pedagogical content knowledge?: Exploring learning outcomes for Australian trainee teachers in physical education2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of physical education teacher education (PETE), content knowledge (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) are constructions of different forms of teacher knowledge that have been used to address knowledge of a subject and knowledge of teaching a subject to young people (Herold & Waring 2009, Siedentop 2009, Tinning 2010). This paper addresses how these two forms of teacher knowledge are valued through a study of learning outcomes (LOs) in syllabus documents at a sample of PETE universities in New South Wales, Australia. The US educationalist Lee Shulman (1987) originally defined CK as “the accumulation of literature and studies in content areas, and the historical and philosophical scholarship on the nature of knowledge in those fields of study” (p. 8-9). In the PETE context, CK is constructed by various sub-disciplines (Tinning 2010). According to Siedentop (2009), one of the most fundamental as well as the most marginalized of these sub-disciplines, is PE teacher students’ knowledge of movement. In this study, specific interest is devoted to how CK and PCK are expressed in documents regulating sport and movement courses within PETE. Regarding PCK, Shulman (1987) suggests it to be “that special amalgam of content and pedagogy that is uniquely the province of teachers, their own special form of professional understanding” (p. 8. Globally, there seems to be an agreement for the importance of future PE teachers to experience movement and sport practices during their education. However, there also seems to be different ideas about whether CK or PCK should by prioritized in the teaching and assessment of movement and sport practices during PETE (Backman & Pearson 2016, Capel, et al 2011, Herold & Waring 2009, Johnson 2013, Tinning 2010). The study of how LOs are expressed in an educational context can inform us not only of what forms of knowledge are most valued. It might also say something about PE teacher educators’ abilities to formulate his/her expectations of the student’s performance. For this instance, the discussion of learning objectives as formulated in university courses has lately been intensified. In Europe, this discussion has been strongly related to the intentions in the Bologna-declaration (Adam 2008, Brooks et al 2014, Hussey & Smith 2008). Some of the issues raised in the literature have concerned ways of formulating verbs in learning outcomes, student activity built into learning outcomes, and level of difficulty in learning outcomes (Adam 2008, Biggs & Tang 2007). Therefore, the aim of this paper is to analyse LOs formulated in syllabus document for sport courses at a sample of Australian PETE institutions. Further, the aim is to discuss these LOs through a framework regarding teacher knowledge originating from Lee Shulman (1987). Although PETE, like university programs in other subjects, are historical and cultural constructions, research from European countries such as UK, France, Sweden (Backman &Pearson 2016, Capel, et al 2011, Loquet & Ranganathan 2010) display similarities with the Australian PETE context. One characteristic feature of PETE in all these countries is the relative emphasis on constructivist epistemology and critical pedagogy, although this feature appears to be somewhat stronger in Australia compared to Europe and US. In times where the content in PETE is crowded and the time for teaching is short, a study of what forms of PE teacher knowledge are valued in some Australian PETE institutions, a context where the production of PETE research has been significant during the last decades (see e.g. Forrest 2015, Garrett & Wrench 2012, MacDonald et al 2002, Tinning 2010), can therefore serve as a valuable contrast for the discussion of knowledge forms in European PETE contexts.    

    Methods/methodology (up to 400 words) 

    By the end of 2014, there were 24 universities across Australia offering PETE, eight in New South Wales (NSW). These eight universities in NSW makes the total sample (N=8) in the study reported in this paper. To the collection of the empirical material in form of written documents, five PETE-universities (n=5) of the total sample have contributed. Each university was asked to contribute with two unit outlines for courses in sport and movement for PETE students. A unit outline is a written document intended to give the student more specific information compared to what a curriculum document for a course will provide (e.g. regarding examination, schedule, expectations, etc). Further, a unit is generally only a part of a whole course. The collected unit outlines contained a the total number of 73 LOs. The sample of unit outlines can be described as a strategic and purposeful sample (Patton, 2002). The empirical collection from the participating universities was carried out during November and December 2014. After information about the study through e-mail and phone, a total number of 10 unit outlines were sent to the author by e-mail. In the analysis Alvesson and Sköldberg (1994) description of analytical induction or abduction has served as an inspiration. This means trying to let, on one hand, the empirical material inform the choice of theoretical perspective while on the other hand, acknowledging that some specific theoretical perspectives, in this case Shulman’s (1987) forms of teacher knowledge, have been viewed as more relevant than others before conducting the study. The primary analysis has been divided into two steps. In the first step, when reading through the collected and transcribed material questions such as: ‘What movement and sport practices do students meet during PETE in NSW?’ and ‘How are movement and sport practices expressed through the LOs in the unit outlines?’ has been asked. Asking these questions to the material has involved a process of clustering described by Patton (2002) as convergence which has been followed up by a process of divergence, that is, an exclusion of formulations and quotes that do not fit into the identified pattern. In the second stage of the analysis, the choice of Shulman’s (1987) concepts for forms of teacher knowledge was confirmed and strengthened as we discovered that the different views of assessment of movement and sport practices were clearly related to our chosen definitions of CK and PCK.

    Expected outcomes/results (up to 300 words) 

    The preliminary analysis of the LOs shows that the knowledge in sport and movement courses at the investigated PETE institutions is sometimes formulated as CK and sometimes as PCK (Shulman 1987). Within these two main categories there were also sub-categories related to abilities expressed through different verbs. With regards to PCK one such main sub-category addressed the students’ ability to “plan, arrange, carry out and assess different forms of teaching situations”. Further, another ability expressed within the PCK category was the ability to “observe, analyse and critically reflect over educational practices”. These two PCK sub-categories clearly reflect research emphasizing critical pedagogy in Australian PETE (Garrett & Wrench 2012, MacDonald et al 2002, Tinning 2010). Further, two other forms of sub-categories, expressed both as CK and as PCK, was firstly, the ability to “perform movements” and secondly, the ability to “demonstrate an understanding” of different forms of movement and sport practices. Findings will be discussed in relation to research criticizing the decrease of sport performances in PETE (Herold & Waring 2009, Siedentop 2009) as well as work emphasizing the importance to teach and assess movement practices to PETE students in contextualized situations (Backman & Pearson 2016). The concept of “understanding” was found to be very commonly used in LOs both when expressed as CK and as PCK. Generally, students were encouraged to “demonstrate an understanding” of different forms of knowledge. In literature of how to formulate knowledge in higher education, the concept of understanding has been discussed, sometimes criticized as lacking precision (Adam 2008, Biggs & Tang 2007), sometimes claimed to be under-contextualised (Hussey & Smith 2008). Part of the discussion will focus on various meanings of understanding in sport courses at some Australian PETE-institutions and how these meanings can differ depending on whether CK or PCK is addressed.

    Intent of publication:  

    References (400 words)

    Adam, S. (2008). Learning Outcomes Current Developments in Europe: Update on the Issues and Applications of Learning Outcomes Associated with the Bologna Process. Retrieved 12 May 2015, from http://www.ond.vlaanderen.be/hogeronderwijs/bologna/BolognaSeminars/documents/Edinburgh/Edinburgh_Feb08_Adams.pdf

    Alvesson, M. & Sköldberg, K. (1994). Tolkning och Reflektion. Vetenskapsfilosofi och Kvalitativ Metod. Lund: Studentlitteratur.

    Backman, E. & Pearson, P. (2016) ‘We should assess the students in more authentic situations’: Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers. European Physical Education Review, 22, 47–64.

    Biggs, J., & Tang, C. (2007). Teaching for Quality Learning at University. Third edition. Maidenhead: Open University Press.

    Brooks, S., Dobbins, K., Scott, J. J., Rawlinson, M., & Norman, R. I. (2014). Learning about Learning Outcomes: The Student Perspective. Teaching in Higher Education, 19, 721-733.

    Capel, S., Hayes, S., Katene, W. and Velija, P. (2011). The interaction of factors which influence secondary student physical education teachers’ knowledge and development as teachers. European Physical Education Review, 17, 183–201.

    Forrest, G. (2015). Systematic assessment of game-centred approach practices – the game-centred approach Assessment Scaffold. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, 20, 144-158.

    Garrett, R. & Wrench, A. (2012). ‘Society has taught us to judge’: cultures of the body in teacher education. Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 40, 111–126.

    Herold, F. & Waring, M. (2009). Pre-service physical education teachers’ perceptions of subject knowledge: Augmenting learning to teach. European Physical Education Review, 15, 337–364.

    Hussey, T., & Smith, P. (2008). Learning Outcomes: A Conceptual Analysis. Teaching in Higher Education, 13 (1), 107-115.

    Johnson, T.G. (2013). The value of performance in Physical Education teacher education. Quest, 65, 485-497.

    Loquet, M. & Ranganathan, M. (2010). Content knowledge in teaching, an investigation into an adequate ‘milieu’ for teaching dance: The case of Indian dance in France. European Physical Education Review, 16, 65–79.

    MacDonald, D., Hunter, L., Carlson, T. & Penney, D. (2002). Teacher Knowledge and the Disjunction between School Curricula and Teacher Education. Asia-Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 30, 259-275.

    Patton, M.Q. (2002). Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods. London: Sage Publications.

    Shulman, L.S. (1987). Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform. Harvard Educational Review, 57(1), 1-21.

    Siedentop, D. (2009). Content Knowledge for Physical Education. In R. Bailey & D. Kirk (Eds.), The Routledge Physical Education Reader (pp. 243-253). Abingdon: Routledge.

    Tinning, R. (2010). Pedagogy and human movement: theory, practice, research. Abingdon: Routledge.

  • 4.
    Backman, Erik
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    ”Tell us what to do and how to assess!”: Swedish PE teachers’ experiences of the implementation of Support For Assessment in outdoor education.2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, as in many European countries, Outdoor Education (OE, or its Scandinavian equivalent as friluftsliv) is in the formal school setting positioned within the subject Health and Physical Education (HPE). In the curriculum for compulsory school, implemented in 2011, OE is organized as one of three areas of knowledge along with Health and Lifestyle, and Movement. In order to meet the increasing call for a more equal assessment and grading in Swedish Schools, the Swedish National Agency of Education (SNAE) completed the curriculum in HPE with a material (text and film) named Support For Assessment (SFA) in 2012. As responsible for the construction of OE in SFA the author followed up the implementation of the SFA with several presentations and workshops for teachers in HPE during 2013 and 2014. The purpose of this presentation is to describe how OE was constructed in the SFA in Swedish HPE for compulsory school and further to analyse and discuss reactions from Swedish HPE teachers expressed in evaluations after the mentioned presentations and workshops. The results suggest that while a part of the HPE teachers found the SFA useful and effective, another part called for more concrete advices on what to assess in OE and how to assess it. Drawing on Basil Bernstein’s theories of how pedagogical messages are communicated and evaluated in school systems, the results will be discussed in relation to the classification of OE within Swedish HPE.

  • 5.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Högskolan Dalarna, Idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Assessment of movement in Swedish PETE: A matter of learning or just ticking a box?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The general knowledge base of Health and Physical Education Teacher Education (HPETE) is growing stronger. As a part of that knowledge base there is an ongoing discussion of the meaning of HPETE students’ movement capabilities (Brown 2013, Capel et al 2011, Johnson 2013, Siedentop 2009, Tinning 2010). Lee Shulman’s (1987) framework of Content Knowledge (CK) and Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK) have been used by scholars to examine how students’ ability to move and their ability to teach are valued in HPETE (Backman & Pearson 2016, Herold & Waring 2016, Ward et al 2015). However, the students’ own voices about these issues have rarely been acknowledged. The aim with this paper is therefore to examine how HPETE students at one university in Sweden experience the assessment of movement knowledge in and about aquatics, dance and ice-skating. Semi-structured interviews with two groups including a total of seven students were performed by the one researcher at three different occasions. The interviewing researcher’s regularly work is not at the same university as the participating students. The interviews focused specifically on the teaching and assessment of aquatics, dance and skating within the first semester of HPETE. The transcription of the six interviews was performed by external assistance and the students were all anonymized in the transcribed material. The following analysis, performed by two researchers stationed at the same university as the participating students, focused on how the transcribed material related to the aim and the concepts of Shulman. Preliminary results show several expressions of that the students in our study were not sure of what kinds or what level of movement knowledge were expected of them as they entered HPETE. Further, several students expressed limited possibilities to develop movement ability merely through HPETE teaching but at the same time, practicing unfamiliar movements outside HPETE teacher-led teaching was rare. Although assessment of movement knowledge were most commonly expressed as a qualitative process, some students mentioned that they occasionally experienced assessment of movement knowledge as “a-tick-in-a-box”. Interestingly, the cognitive aspects of movement knowledge (i.e. describe, observe, analyse, discuss, etc.) were on the one hand expressed as vital, but on the other as less characterized by learning compared to the practice of movement skills. The results will be analysed and discussed in relation to research within the field and in relation to Lee Shulman’s framework of CK and PCK. Although making no claims to generalize the results in this study based on the limited number of participants, they might contribute to the discussion of what forms of knowledge to prioritise in HPETE, and thereby also help develop HPE on a school level.

    References

    Backman, E. & Pearson, P. 2016. “We should assess the students in more authentic situations”. Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers. European Physical Education Review. 22(1): 47-64.

    Brown, T.D. 2013. “A vision lost? (Re)articulating an Arnoldian conception of education ‘in’ movement in physical education.” Sport, Education and Society 18 (1): 21-37.

    Capel, S., Hayes, S., Katene, W. and P. Velija. 2011. “The interaction of factors which influence secondary student physical education teachers’ knowledge and development as teachers.” European Physical Education Review, 17 (2): 183–201.

    Herold, F. and M. Waring. 2016. “Is practical subject matter knowledge still important? Examining the Siedentopian perspective on the role of content knowledge in physical education teacher education.” Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1080/17408989.2016.1192592

    Johnson, T.G. 2013. “The value of performance in Physical Education teacher education.” Quest 65 (4): 485-497.

    Shulman, L.S. 1987. “Knowledge and Teaching: Foundations of the New Reform.” Harvard Educational Review 57 (1): 1-21.

    Siedentop, D. 2009. “Content Knowledge for Physical Education. In The Routledge Physical Education Reader, edited by R. Bailey and D. Kirk, 243-253. Abingdon: Routledge

    Tinning, R. 2010. Pedagogy and human movement: theory, practice, research. Abingdon: Routledge.

    Ward, P., Kim, I., Ko, B. and W. Li. 2015. “Effects of Improving Teachers’ Content Knowledge on Teaching and Student Learning in Physical Education.” Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport 86 (2): 130–139.

  • 6.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Idrotts- och hälsovetenskap.
    Tidén, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Pihl, Lars
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Svanström, Fredrik
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Wiorek, Dan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Peer-assessment of technical and tactical skills in invasion games - possibilities and limitations?2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom idrottslärarutbildning har det utbildningsinnehåll som handlar om att utveckla studenters ämneskunskaper i idrott kraftigt reducerats under de senaste decennierna. Inte minst har den delav ämneskunskapen som handlar om studenters förmåga att delta i och undervisa om idrottsliga praktiker drabbats (Kirk 2010). När utrymmet för ett ämnesområde begränsas aktualiseras frågor om innehåll och bedömning. Alltmedan de flesta inom fältet är eniga om betydelsen för studenter att få erfarenheter av rörelse och idrott under sin utbildning finns olika uppfattningar om huruvida man ska bedöma studenters förmåga att praktiskt utöva idrott. Hur man förhåller sig denna fråga har i hög grad visat sig vara kulturellt betingat (Backman & Pearson submitted, Herold & Waring 2009, Siedentop 2009, Tinning 2010). I svensk idrottslärarutbildning har just den idrottsliga bedömningens vara eller inte vara visat på en komplexitet och ambivalens (Backman & Pearson 2016).I en tid av alltmer begränsade resurser har problematiken delvis handlat om huruvida man ska bedöma (och därigenom värdera) studentens förmåga att delta i idrott som ett mål i sig eller om man ska bedöma studentens förmåga att undervisa i och om idrott (Backman & Larsson 2016, Maivorsdotter et al 2014). I de studier som belyst den idrottsliga färdighetens position ochbetydelse inom idrottslärarutbildning har studenters röst varit sparsamt förekommande. I denna studie vill vi därför, genom en implementering av en internationellt etablerad modell för studentmedbedömning i bollspel (Games Performance Assessment Instrument, GPAI) (Oslin et al 1998) i kurser för blivande idrottslärare, ge röst åt studenters syn på studentbedömning av förmågan att spela bollspel. I studien har 140 studenter (N=140) på lärarprogrammet vid Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan i Stockholm deltagit. Studien är genomförd inom ramen för en ordinarie bollspelskurs om 3 hp som motsvarar 18 lektionstillfällen med 90 minuters undervisning vid varje tillfälle. Till detta lades två extra lektioner om 90 min för att genomföra studien/datainsamlingen. Studenterna har under och efter kursen bidragit till datainsamlingen i kursen genom ifyllande av etablerade bedömningsformulär där de analyserat varandras spelförmåga. Vidare har studenterna svarat på en utvärdering av hur GPAI implementerats i kursen med hjälp av ett enkätverktyg. Syftet med kursen som studenterna deltagit i är att studenterna ska utveckla sin spelförmåga, leda målspel i skolan samt didaktiska aspekter på målspel i skolan. Studien har omfattat studentmedbedömning i spelen handboll, basket och fotboll som inte enbart ska ses som en utbildning i dessa spel utan som representation för bollspel i allmänhet. Deltagarna i studien representerar alla studenter som hösten 2016 läste den beskrivna kursen. Alla studenter fick information om att deltagandet var frivilligt och att de kunde avbryta när som helst utan att det skulle på verka deras betyg eller vara negativt för dem på något annat sätt. Alla studenter ville vara med i studien. I vår preliminära analys har vi funnit att studenternas observationer av varandra visade på stor variation avseende spelförmåga. I utvärderingen av GPAI-projektet har studenterna uttryckt att de visserligen förstod syftet med GPAI-projektet, och att de förstod hur de skulle bidra till datainsamlingen genom att analysera varandras spelförmåga, men att de var tveksamma till relevansen av GPAI i en bedömningskontext i skolan. Resultaten kommer att analyseras vidare och diskuteras i relation till Shulmans begrepp ämneskunskap (Content Knowledge) och ämnesdidaktisk kunskap (Pedagogical Content Knowledge) samt i relation till teorier om bedömning. I en diskussion där perspektiven ofta begränsas till forskarens och/eller idrottslärarutbildarens kan studenter bidra med viktig kunskap om vad de ser som relevant kunskap för sin kommande yrkesroll.

     

    Referenser

    Backman, E & Pearson, P (submitted) Is movement knowledge common, specialized or pedagogic? Voices of teacher educators on assessment of movement and sport courses in the preparation of Australian HPE teachers. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy

    Backman, E & Pearson, P (2016) “We should assess the students in more authentic situations”. Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers. European Physical Education Review. 22(1), 47-64.

    Backman, E & Larsson, H (2016) What should a Physical Education teacher know? An analysis of learning outcomes for future Physical Education teachers in Sweden. Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy. 21(2), 185-200.

    Herold F and Waring M (2009) Pre-service physical education teachers’ perceptions of subject knowledge: Augmenting learning to teach. European Physical Education Review 15(3): 337–364.

    Kirk D (2010) Physical Education Futures. Abingdon: Routledge.

    Oslin, J.L., S.A. Mitchell, & L.L. Griffin. (1998). The Game Performance Assessment Instrument (GPAI): Development and preliminary validation. Journal of Teaching in Physical Education 17(2) p. 231–243.

    Siedentop D (2009) Content Knowledge for Physical Education. In: Bailey R and Kirk D (eds) The Routledge Physical Education Reader. Abingdon: Routledge, pp. 243-253.

    Tinning R (2010) Pedagogy and human movement: theory,practice, research. Abingdon: Routledge.

  • 7.
    Barker, D. M.
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Aggerholm, K.
    Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Standal, O.
    nland Norway University College of Applied Science, Elverum, Norway; Oslo and Akershus University College of Applied Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Developing the practising model in physical education: an expository outline focusing on movement capability.2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 209-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical educators currently have a number of pedagogical (or curricular) models at their disposal. While existing models have been well-received in educational contexts, these models seek to extend students’ capacities within a limited number of ‘human activities’ (Arendt, 1958). The activity of human practising, which is concerned with the improvement of the self, is not explicitly dealt with by current models.

    Purpose: The aim of the paper is to outline how a model of human practising related to movement capability could be enacted in physical education.

    Findings: Building on a theoretical exposition of human practising presented in a separate paper, this paper provides a practically oriented discussion related to: (1) the general learning outcomes as well as teaching and learning strategies of the model; (2) an outline of five activities that describe how the model could be implemented; and (3) the non-negotiable features of the model.

    Discussion: The model’s potential contribution to the ongoing revitalization of PE as an institutionalized educational practice is discussed. Points concerning how the model relates to wider physical cultures, its position regarding transfer of learning, standards of excellence, and social and cultural transmission are considered.

    Conclusion: The paper is concluded with some reflections on pedagogical models generally and how they relate to the pedagogical model of practising movement capability presented in this paper.

  • 8.
    Barker, Dean
    et al.
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap vid Göteborgs universitet.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Transformative pedagogy in physical education and the challenges of young people with migration backgrounds2016In: Routledge Handbook of Physical Education Pedagogies / [ed] Catherine D. Ennis, Routledge, 2016, p. 356-367Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter provides an overview of scholarship dealing with ethnicity and cultural diversity in relation to PE. It identifies two central themes that have occupied scholars over the last two decades: Muslim girls’ experiences, and teachers’ preparedness to respond to increasing cultural pluralism. It also takes in a small number of investigations focusing on the experiences and perceptions of young people from minority groups. In synthesizing this literature, the chapter underscores recurring issues, central findings, and implications for practitioners, as well as identifying themes that require further theoretical and practical attention.

  • 9.
    Book, Karin
    et al.
    Malmö universitet.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Att göra det organiserade spontant eller organisera det spontana: om lösa relationer i en flytande tid2018In: Sport management: Idrottens organisationer i en svensk kontext. Del 1 / [ed] Bäckström, Å., Book, K., Carlsson, B., & Fahlström, P., Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker , 2018, 1, p. 190-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Brädsporten drar in i den vetenskapliga världens finrum: recension av boken Skateboarding: Subcultures, sites and shifts / Kara-Jane Lombard (red), 20162016In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, article id 26 oktoberArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Forty Years of Transformations: Swedish Skateboarding Culture and Organisation2018In: Managing Sport in a Changing Europe: The 26th European Sport Management Conference, Book of abstracts / [ed] Bo Carlsson, Tim Breitbarth, Daniel Bjärsholm, 2018, p. 285-286Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forty Years of Transformations - Swedish Skateboarding Culture and Organisation

    Aim

    The aim of this presentation is to sum up findings from ethnographic and historic datacollected for a period of twenty years in order to outline the transformations of skateboardingculture and organisation in Sweden from the 1970’s to present day.

    Theoretical Background and Literature Review

    Skateboarding has a celebrated subversive past claiming heritage from Californian surferssneaking into emptied backyard swimming pools during summer draught. The (hi)story hasbeen commemorated through the classic movie Dogtown and the Z-boys. Ever since, socialresistance has been part and parcel of skateboarding’s cultural image (Borden, 2001).Although stemming from subcultural and underground practices, skateboarding has nowreached worldwide audiences through X-games. In June this year, the sport’s firstinternational conference titled Pushing boarders was held in London. It gathered academicscholars, skateboarders and engaged people from the industry. Moreover, in 2020,skateboarding will be launched as a new sport in the Olympic Games. Skateboarders onceopposing the sport industry and nine-five-jobs have transformed from core practitioners toconsumers (Dinces, 2011; Dupont, 2014; Lombard, 2010). This depicts a transformation fromsubculture to a professionalised sport, at least for some and in some places. In Sweden,parallel to these trends, skateboarding contrastingly formed a national federation under theNational Sports Confederation (RF) for the first time 2013.

    Research Design and Data Analysis

    Through four ethnographic projects extending over two decades, and related historicalmaterial, this presentation draws from participant observation and multiple empiricalmaterials. Ethnography has the potential to capture “inside” views of everyday life (Atkinson,2014). The research participants are diverse in terms of age, gender and positions in the fieldetc. The data includes interviews, photographs and various media in both printed and digitalfrom. It contains both commercial and non-commercial content and spans from the late1970’s until present day. The semi-structured interviews follow thematically structured guidesand were conducted face-to-face with snowball samples. For this presentation Stamm andLamprecht’s (1998) model for describing the life cycle of trend sports is used as a startingpoint for a thematic content analysis over time. The model indicates the interrelation oftechnological innovation, marketing and socio-cultural factors.

    Findings and Discussion

    Every stage in Stamm and Lamprecht’s (1998) model is characterized by different degrees ofcommercialisation, as well as diverse types of organisation and various degrees ofrecognition. The trend sports are also pursued by different groups; in the early stages pioneersand further on by young people in subcultures, followed by athletes in the fourth stage toanybody in the final stage. Confrontation against the established sport organisations andglorification of a presumed authentic past is part of the third stage. This is followed byfashion in mainstream culture as part of the fourth stage.298It is argued that skateboarding in Sweden to some extent has followed this model. Numerousexamples point to the fourth stage characterized by maturation and diffusion. For instance it ispossible for practitioners to make a living from skateboarding in various ways; skateboardingis popular in mass media; goods are mass produces and skateboarding has been integrated incertain school forms. In short, processes of commercialisation and professionalization arepresent.The straight forward processes proposed in the model are however complicated byskateboarding in Sweden since 2013 being formally organized though the National SportsConfederation. Through this organisation some skateboarders are now part and parcel ofmainstream sports, however their subcultural ideas persist, not least when it comes toleadership and coaching. This is paradoxically partly challenging the National SportsConfederation in that funding systems are urged to be re-negotiated. Simultaneously, theSwedish skateboarding association opens up activities for inclusion and equality urged by theNational Sports Confederation.

    Conclusion and Implications

    The presentation contributes with new empirical findings on the socio-cultural developmentof skateboarding in Sweden and beyond, which confirms but also complicates the straightforward model of the life cycle of trend sports. Skateboarding has gone from innovativephysical activity recognised by few, to highly commercialised and familiar, but it is also anational association with no commercial profit promoting democratic values.

    References

    Atkinson, P. (2014). For Ethnography. London: Sage.

    Borden, I. (2001). Skateboarding, Space and the City: Architecture and the Body. New York: Berg.

    Dinces, S. (2011). ‘Flexible Opposition’: Skateboarding Subcultures under the Rubric of LateCapitalism. The International Journal of the History of Sport, 28(11), 1512-1535.

    Dupont, T. (2014). From Core to Consumer: The Informal Hierarchy of the Skateboard Scene. Journalof Contemporary Ethnography, 43(5), 556-581.

    Lombard, K. (2010). Skate and create/skate and destroy: The commercial and governmentalincorporation of skateboarding. Continuum: Journal Of Media & Cultural Studies, 24(4),475-488.

    Stamm, H-P. & Lamprecht, B. (1998) The life cycle of trend sports. In: C. Jaccoud & Y. Pedrazzini(Eds) Glisser dans la ville: les politiques sportives a` l’e’preuve des sports de rue[Gliding in the street: sporting politics related to street sports], Acts from the Neuchâtel.Colloquium of the 18th and 19th Septembre 1997 (Neuchâtel, Editions CIES).

  • 12.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Med kultur som förstoringsglas: Anglosfäriska texter om kvinnor och ”action”-sport: recension av boken 'Women in Action Sport Cultures: Identity, Politics and Experience', red. Holly Thorpe & Rebecca Olive (2016)2017In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, article id 23 novemberArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    The changing room as a site for transformation2018In: 34th Nordic Ethnology and Folklore Conference: What matters – Accounting for culture in a post factual world, Uppsala, 2018, p. 183-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whether practiced in schools or in sports clubs, the changing room provides a site for transforming yourself from the everyday you to the sporting you and then back again. This transformation involves social, cultural, material, sensorial and affective aspects. For instance, shedding the outer skin, metaphorically speaking, reveals what is beneath, i.e. the naked body with all its beauty and fleshly flaws. The commonplace mirrors support not only individual physical scrutiny, as well as social interaction on what is displayed, but visibility per se. This is a place for regulating looks, but also for regulating observational practices. Although perhaps foregrounding the visual, changing rooms are nevertheless highly multisensorial. The echoing glazed tiles in the showers bounce the sound of cascading waters. Bodily odours like sweat mix with smells from shampoo, various skin products and deodorants. Although this space and the transformations occurring here are fascinating and may provide new knowledge on the way we handle our material bodies in relation to sports, it is an ethically challenging space for doing ethnography. How can this space and the transformations occurring here be studied ethnographically without transgressing integrity?

  • 14.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Women of the wild west – skateboarding in sensorial cityscapes2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With its prominent street style, skateboarding may be described as a fine example of urban sport. Although deriving from the culturally western world which boasts of a high level of gender equality, the representation of women in skateboarding has remained surprisingly low. In addition, urban milieus in the open and liberal European society have lately been described as places where young women may face harassments and aggression. Drawing from long term sensory ethnography and inspired by later theoretical turns in social sciences focusing the importance of the material environment, this paper discuss how women skateboarders experience the physical activity as enmeshed with the material context at the same time heavily depending on the social and cultural context. The urban environment with its smooth marble or rough asphalt surfaces, its alarming sounds and tingling smells forms the experience of skateboarding. Moreover, it forms the construction of femininity. This paper contributes with new empirical findings on what it means to practise a physical activity in urban locations as a gendered minority. In doing so, it also adds to the discussion on how a material feminist theory might be sketched and developed without overlooking the social and cultural aspects.

  • 15.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Book, KarinMalmö universitet.Carlsson, BoLinnéuniversitetet.Fahlström, PG
    Sport management: Idrottens organisationer i en svensk kontext. Del 12018Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idrottens landskap förändras. Två tendenser är särskilt tydliga: professionalisering och kommersialisering. I den här boken beskrivs hur dessa tendenser tar sig uttryck i relation till hur idrotten organiseras. Det handlar om nya sätt att organisera idrott, som skapar såväl nya förutsättningar som utmaningar. Inte minst utmanar dessa nya organisationsformer rådande sätt att betrakta idrott.

    Sport management handlar om att planera, organisera, leda och utvärdera idrott. Sedan drygt femton år tillbaka finns universitetsutbildningar som tar det här kunskaps- och forskningsområdet på största allvar. Författarna i den här boken har varit med och byggt upp dessa utbildningar. De har också forskat och undervisat inom området och på så vis bidragit till fältets expansion och vetenskaplighet såväl i Sverige som internationellt.

    Boken är den första i en serie om tre böcker om sport management i Sverige. Det är den enda aktuella boken om sport management på svenska. Det är också den enda boken som tar utgångspunkt i svenska förhållanden.

    För professionella inom idrottens administrativa värld är det här en oumbärlig bok. Den ger bland annat svar på frågorna: Varför ser idrottens svenska organisationer ut som de gör? Hur kommer det sig att den ideella idrottsrörelsen blivit så stark i Sverige? Varför sitter fler män än kvinnor på styrande positioner inom idrotten? Och har det någon betydelse att barngympan organiseras av ett kommersiellt företag?

  • 16.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Nairn, Karen
    University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand.
    Skateboarding beyond the limits of gender?: Strategic interventions in Sweden2018In: Leisure Studies, ISSN 0261-4367, E-ISSN 1466-4496, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 24-439Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden prides itself as a country where young women can enjoy gender equality. Yet many young women skateboarders still experience discomfort when skateboarding in public spaces. We argue that diverse strategies are required to intervene in the intransigent problem of gender inequality in the male-dominated sport of skateboarding. We discuss two intertwined strategies adopted in Swedish skateboarding contexts, strategic visibility and strategic entitlement. Strategic visibility is premised on making girls a special case, separated from the boys, and therefore highly visible. The other intervention goes beyond the limits of gender, aiming to achieve strategic entitlement, which takes-for-granted girls’ participation and competence. Drawing from ethnographic data, we explore the paradoxical spaces of these interventions, identifying the benefits and risks of each strategy. We conclude that both strategies are important, yet the latter breaks new ground. Strategic entitlement, which constructs skateboarding girls as ordinary and indistinguishable from boys, no longer constructs gender as a limiting factor. Interventions to promote gender equality should include strategies that seek to go beyond gender and strategies that acknowledge the significance of gender. We need to keep experimenting with and researching the unintended consequences of all strategies for challenging and changing male dominance in sport and leisure.

  • 17.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Nairn, Karen
    Otago University.
    Sweden’s gender (in)equalities: How young women skateboarders materialise femininity in public space2016In: Crossroads in Cultural Studies, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden prides itself as a country where young women can enjoy gender equality. Yet many young women skateboarders experience harassment in public spaces. Drawing from a sensory ethnography, and inspired by the material turn in the social sciences, we analyse how women skateboarders experience the material environments of urban public space, while paying attention to the social and cultural context of Sweden. The urban environment with its smooth marble or rough asphalt surfaces, its alarming sounds and tingling smells, shapes the experience of skateboarding and the construction of femininity. The construction of femininity is also shaped by a social and cultural context that assumes ‘gender equality’ is secure. This paper contributes new empirical findings on what it means to skateboard in public spaces as a gendered minority, and adds to the debate on how a material feminist theory might be developed without overlooking the significance of social and cultural contexts.

  • 18.
    Carlsson, Bo
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Fahlström, PG
    Book, Karin
    Malmö universitet.
    Introduktion2018In: Sport management: Idrottens organisationer i en svensk kontext. Del 1 / [ed] Bäckström, Å., Book, K., Carlsson, B., & Fahlström, P., Stockholm: SISU idrottsböcker , 2018, p. 5-13Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Efverström, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Två aktuella böcker problematiserar den moraliska kampen mot dopning inom idrotten: Recension av böckerna The War on Drugs in Sport av Vanessa McDermott och Testing for Athlete Citizenship av Kathryn E. Henne2016In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 16 marsArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Efverström, Anna
    et al.
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Hoff, David
    Lunds universitet.
    Anti-doping and legitimacy: An international survey of elite athletes’ perceptions2014In: Performance Enhancement & Health, ISSN 2211-2669, 2014, Vol. 3, p. 115-Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Efverström, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    Hoff, David
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Anti-doping and legitimacy: an international survey of elite athletes’ perceptions2016In: International Journal of Sport Policy, ISSN 1940-6940, E-ISSN 1940-6959, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 491-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anti-doping work is a comprehensive enterprise that entails control and governance of elite athletes? everyday lives. However, in policy-making regarding doping and anti-doping in elite sports, the athletes? perspective has not been considered adequately. Focusing on elite athletes? perceptions of anti-doping as both principle and praxis, the study aimed to analyse how these perceptions can be understood from a legitimacy perspective. A survey study involving 261 elite athletes from 51 different countries and four international sports federations was conducted. The results showed that the athletes did not question the legitimacy of the rules, but had concerns about the legitimacy of the way the rules and principles are enforced in practice, specifically with regard to matters of privacy, lack of efficiency and equal conditions as well as athletes? involvement in the anti-doping work. The article describes how athletes? perceptions of the legitimacy of anti-doping work constitute the basis for their willingness to follow regulations as well as a precondition for the work?s functionality and stability. In light of this finding, the article calls for the empowerment of athletes in anti-doping work.

  • 22.
    Efverström, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning. Högskolan i Gävle.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Different socities, different conditions: Lessons from anti-doping in elite-sport on a global level2017In: Doping in sport, doping in society - Lessons, themes and connections: Book of abstracts, Aarhus University, Department of Public Health , 2017, p. 7-8Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Justice and fairness in sport is fundamental for its legitimate existence. On a global level, the creation of the World Anti-Doping Agency and the regulatory framework World Anti-Doping Code was formed largely as a consequence of the need for a coordination of the work against performance enhancing drugs in sports. Today, the anti-doping system often means application of rules and "best practice" developed in the cultural West for the cultural rest. Research on anti-doping policy or practice not only tends to be based on deductive models, these models may also assumingly be culturally biased. Moreover, we have relatively little knowledge of the practical conditions for individual athletes concerning implementation of the rules in different contexts around the world. This presentation, however, adds to the existing research with new empirical findings from interview data on diverging conditions for elite athletes in different social, cultural and geographical contexts. Through exploring how 13 elite athletes from five continents and three different sports federations perceived the anti-doping programme, we were able to show that global anti-doping policy was implemented in different contexts under different conditions. These differences included infrastructure, knowledge and support. How participation in anti-doping procedures on an everyday basis is endorsed may thus vary around the world.

    By examining our interview data on the athletes’ perceptions and experiences in relation to theories of procedural justice, we were able to analyse the legitimacy of anti-doping in practice. These findings suggest that inequities and structural injustice emerge on an individual level because of the varying contexts and conditions. In turn, the consequences may have implications for the legitimacy of the anti-doping work. In order to understand implementation processes of regulations, we propose that anti-doping policy-making pay attention to differences that may exist on an individual and practical level. Perspectives that underpin regulations applied globally should in other words be sensitive to varying contexts and conditions.

  • 23.
    Efverström, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Ahmadi, Nader
    Högskolan i Gävle.
    Hoff, David
    Lunds universitet.
    Contexts and conditions for a level playing field: Elite athletes’ perspectives on anti-doping in practice2016In: Performance Enhancement & Health, ISSN 2211-2669, E-ISSN 2211-2669, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 77-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The implementation of global anti-doping regulations was intended to provide a level playing field for all athletes entering sports competitions. However, studies have shown that the worldwide harmonization of rules has not been entirely efficacious. For instance, great variation has been found in how anti-doping organizations implement anti-doping regulations, and it has also been shown that athletes distrust the equivalence of the worldwide rules as regards their effects. The purpose of the present article is to examine how elite athletes from different contexts experience anti-doping procedures and to analyse the legitimacy of anti-doping practice. In order to capture a variety of voices and perspectives, 13 elite athletes from five different continents and three international sports federations were interviewed. The analysis shows that when global anti-doping policy is implemented in different contexts and under different conditions, inequities and structural injustices emerge concerning infrastructure, knowledge and support at the individual athlete level. These consequences may have implications for the legitimacy of anti-doping work, because the existence of procedural justice may be called into questioned. We therefore suggest that anti-doping policy-making should be based on taking into account these different conditions and being aware of the perspectives that underpin regulations intended to be applied global.

  • 24.
    Engström, Lars-Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Redelius, Karin
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Logics of practice in movement culture: Lars-Magnus Engström’s contribution to understanding participation in movement cultures2018In: Sport, Education and Society, ISSN 1357-3322, E-ISSN 1470-1243, p. 892-904Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we present a framework for exploring participation in and social stratification of movement culture based on Pierre Bourdieu?s concept logic of practice. The background to our approach is Lars-Magnus Engström?s struggle to understand the impact of social stratification on participation in movement culture in a now nearly fifty-year follow-up study. The aim of the article is to elaborate further a framework, which Engström drafted in one of his last publications. Here, we assume that participation in movement cultures is guided by a number of logics of practice that are historically, culturally and socially constituted, and which relate to people?s tastes in particular ways that lead to social stratification. These logics are grouped into three overarching kinds of practices: performing, improving and experiencing, which engender both practice and social stratification. Further, the different logics of practice are linked to a principle of uncertainty, which means that quantitative empirical data must be interpreted rather than measured in a strict sense. The here outlined framework suggests that future research about participation in movement culture needs to take into account information about the structure, rhythm and tempo of the practice, as well as of the directionality of the actions. Information about these issues can hopefully contribute to a more elaborated understanding of the impact of social stratification on participation in movement culture, and in what forms movements are pursued.

  • 25.
    Gerdin, Göran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Växjö.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    The productive effect of power: (dis)pleasurable bodies materialising in and through the discursive practices of boys’ physical education.2018In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 66-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Pleasure is often a key feature of school physical education (PE) and, indeed, a lot of students find pleasure in and through PE while others do not. However, pleasure is rarely considered to be of educational value in the subject [Pringle, R. (2010). “Finding Pleasure in Physical Education: A Critical Examination of the Educative Value of Positive Movement Affects.”Quest62: 119–134]. Further, since pleasure is linked to power [Foucault, M. (1980).Power/Knowledge: Selected Interviews and Other Writings, 1972–1977. New York: Pantheon; Gerdin, G., and R. Pringle. (2015). “The Politics of Pleasure: An Ethnographic Examination Exploring the Dominance of the Multi-Activity Sport-Based Physical Education Model.”Sport, Education and Society. doi:10.1080/13573322.2015.1019448] it is in fact not entirely straightforward to legitimise the educational value of PE in relation to pleasure.

    Purpose: In this paper, we explore how a group of boys derive pleasures from their involvement in PE, but also how these power-induced pleasures are integral to gender normalisation processes. The findings presented are particularly discussed in terms of inclusive/exclusive pedagogical practices related to gender, bodies and pleasures.

    Research setting and participants: The research setting was a single-sex, boys’ secondary school in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants in this study were 60 Year 10 (age 14–15) students from two PE classes.

    Data collection and analysis: Using a visual ethnographic approach [Pink, S. (2007).Doing Visual Ethnography. London: Sage] involving observations and video recordings of boys participating in PE, the boys’ representations and interpretations of the visual data were explored during both focus groups and individual interviews. The data were analysed using (a visually oriented) discourse analysis [Foucault, M. (1998). “Foucault.” InMichel Foucault. Aesthetics, Method and Epistemology, edited by J. D. Faubion, 459–463. New York: The New Press; Rose, G. (2007).Visual Methodologies: An Introduction to the Interpretation of Visual Materials. London: Sage].

    Findings: By elucidating the discursive practices of PE in this setting and employing (Butler, J. (1993).Bodies that Matter: On the Discursive Limits of ‘Sex’. New York: Routledge] concept of ‘materialisation’, we suggest that boy’s bodies materialise as productive and pleasurable or displeasurable bodies through submitting/subjecting to certain bodily regimes, developing embodied mastery when it comes to certain sports, and displaying bodies in particular ways. The analysis indicate that the discursive practices of PE contribute to boys’ bodies materialising as pleasurable or displeasurable and the (re)production of gender in the subject as shaped by discourse and the productive effect of power.

    Discussion and conclusions: In line with [Gard, M. (2008). “When a Boy’s Gotta Dance: New Masculinities, Old Pleasures.”Sport, Education and Society13 (2): 181–193], we conclude that the focus on certain discursively constructed bodily practices at the same time continues to restrict the production of a diversity of bodily movement pleasures. Hence, traditional gender patterns are reproduced through a selection of particular sports/physical activities that all the students are expected to participate in. We propose that the ongoing constitution of privileged forms of masculinity, masculine bodies and masculine pleasures as related to fitness, health and sport and (certain) boys’ subsequent exercise of power in PE needs further critical examination. 

  • 26.
    Gibbs, Béatrice
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. School of Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Teaching dance in physical education using exergames2017In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 237-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the different ways in which a dance exergame can be used to teach dance in upper secondary school physical education. Particular attention is paid to the learning processes that students are involved in when the dance game is used as a teaching resource. A socio-cultural perspective on learning constitutes the analytical framework. The study demonstrates three different uses: instructor, facilitator and inspirer. In relation to these uses the students are involved in the following learning processes: learning by imitating, repeating, communicating, negotiating, instructing, modelling and using metaphors. It is argued that dance exergames can be used pedagogically to teach dance because they focus on the moves and steps and allow the teacher to focus on observing, supporting, assigning tasks and providing feedback.

  • 27. Gleddie, Doug
    et al.
    Feith, Joey
    Howe, P. David
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Cale, Lorraine
    Casey, Ashley
    Joey: social media as a tool for professional development2016In: Digital technologies and learning in physical education: pedagogical cases / [ed] Ashley Casey, Victoria A. Goodyear, Kathleen M. Armour, Routledge, 2016, p. 121-136Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Göran, Gerdin
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    (Dis)pleasurable boys' bodies materialising in PE2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pleasure is often a key feature of school physical education (PE) and, indeed, a lot of students find pleasure in and through PE while others do not. However, pleasure is rarely considered to be of educational value in the subject. Further, since pleasure is linked to power it is in fact not entirely straightforward to legitimise the educational value of PE in relation to pleasure. In this paper, we will explore how a group of boys derive pleasures from their involvement in PE, but also how these power-induced pleasures are integral to gender normalisation processes. The paper draws on ethnographic data from a single-sex, boys’ secondary school in New Zealand involving 60 Year 10 (age 14-15) students. Using a visual ethnographic approach (Pink, 2007) consisting of observations and video recordings of boys participating in PE, the boys’ representations and interpretations of the visual data were explored during both focus groups and individual interviews. The data was analysed using (a visually oriented) discourse analysis (Foucault, 1980; Rose, 2007). By elucidating the discursive practices of PE in this setting and employing Butler’s (1993) concept of ‘materialisation’, we argue that boy’s bodies materialise as productive and pleasurable or displeasurable bodies through submitting/subjecting to certain bodily regimes, developing embodied mastery when it comes to certain sports, and displaying bodies in particular ways. The analysis indicates that the discursive practices of PE contribute to boys’ bodies materialising as pleasurable or dis-pleasurable and the (re)production of gender in the subject as shaped by discourse and the productive effect of power. We conclude that the focus on certain discursively constructed bodily practices at the same time continues to restrict the production of a diversity of bodily movement pleasures. Hence, traditional gender patterns are reproduced through a selection of particular sports/physical activities that all the students are expected to participate in. We propose that the ongoing constitution of privileged forms of masculinity, masculine bodies and masculine pleasures as related to fitness, health and sport and (certain) boys’ subsequent exercise of power in PE needs further critical examination.

  • 29.
    Karlefors, Inger
    et al.
    Umeå University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Searching for the ‘How’: Teaching methods in Swedish physical education2018In: Scandinavian Sport Studies Forum, ISSN 2000-088X, E-ISSN 2000-088X, p. 25-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last few decades, focus in educational research – as well as in policy – seems to have shifted from teaching to learning. As a result of this, we know little about what different teaching methods are used in the subject, and how. The purpose of this article is to explore how different teaching methods are used in Swedish secondary physical education. Video recorded physical education lessons in eight Swedish secondary schools were used to identify different teaching methods. Kirk’s (1996) elaboration of the Spectrum of teaching styles formed the basis of the analysis. In subsequent interviews, teachers (8) and students (24) were asked questions about teaching and learning in the subject. All of the five methods that Kirk (1996) outlined were identified in the lessons, but they were very unevenly used. The task-based method was the most frequent one, while the guided discovery method was hardly used at all. The impression was that the teachers did not seriously consider the selection of methods in relation to objective, content and group of students. The students, for their part, described a situation where they were often left to their own devices regarding what they were supposed to learn. Based on the analysis, we argue that teachers need guidance to improve and develop their deliberate use of teaching methods in general, and especially student-centred methods. This is necessary if the goals of the subject are to be achievable for all students. We conclude that the marginal focus on teaching methods in physical education is not related to a parallel increase of the interest in student learning in the subject. On the contrary, the low interest in the use of different teaching methods seems rather to be related to a low interest in what students are to learn in the subject.

  • 30.
    Kroon, Jenny
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Vad är ”kroppslig förmåga”?: Om behovet av ett yrkesspråk i idrott och hälsa2016In: Hur är det i praktiken?: Lärare utforskar ämnet idrott och hälsa / [ed] Håkan Larsson, Suzanne Lundvall, Jane Meckbach, Tomas Peterson & Mikale Quennerstedt, Stockholm: Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH , 2016, p. 117-128Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    På hösten 2011 trädde en förändring i skolans kunskapskrav i kraft vilket ökade kraven på lärare att utveckla ett gemensamt yrkesspråk. Denna förändring förde med sig många frågor från gymnasielärare till Skolverket att ta ställning till. Den enskilt vanligaste frågan handlade om den första meningen i kunskapskravet som lyder: "Eleven kan med säkerhet och med goda rörelsekvaliteter genomföra en bredd av aktiviteter som utvecklar den kroppsliga förmågan." (Skolverket, 2011, s. 88). Lärare ställde flest frågor kring hur progressionsordet med säkerhet ska tolkas. Även frågor som rör "goda rörelsekvaliteter", "en bredd av aktiviteter" och "den kroppsliga förmågan" var vanligt förekommande (Skolverket, 2012).

    Kapitlet syftar till att belysa och diskutera dessa nya formuleringar i relation till gymnasielärares yrkesspråk inom ämnet idrott och hälsa. I det följande kommer jag först att ge en bild av hur lärare tagit emot och förstått läroplanstexter och betygskriterier tidigare I detta avsnitt har jag inspirerats av boken Idrottsdidaktiska utmaningar (2007) med Håkan Larsson och Jane Meckbach som redaktörer, och även av Bengt Selgheds avhandling Ännu icke godkänt (2004). Sedan följer ett avsnitt kring hur de nuvarande kunskapskraven skiljer sig från gymnasieskolans tidigare betygskriterier och inspirationen kommer i detta avsnitt från Karin Redelius text Betygsättning i idrott och hälsa (2007). Därefter följer en redovisning av resultat från den studie jag genomförde våren 2013, där avsikten var att studera hur gymnasielärare talar om den första meningen i kunskapskraven som citerades ovan. Kapitlet avslutas med några reflektioner kring vad dessa resultat kan innebära för verksamheten.

  • 31.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Bedömningar av ungas rörelseförmåga – intervju med Anna Tidén2016In: Idrottsforskaren: Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, no 1, p. 27-32Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 32.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Didaktiska perspektiv på idrott2016In: Idrottsvetenskap: en introduktion / [ed] Susanna Hedenborg, Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 89-112Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 33.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Forskning om undervisning och lärande i skolämnet idrott och hälsa2016In: Idrottsforskaren: Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, no 1, p. 5-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Hur står det till med jämställdheten inom idrotten?2018In: Idrottsforskning.se, ISSN 2002-3944, article id 21 juniArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 35.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Idrott och hälsa: i går, i dag, i morgon2016 (ed. 1)Book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    I Idrott och hälsa – i går, i dag, i morgon belyser författaren utifrån aktuellt forsknings- och utvecklingsarbete bakgrunden till varför kunskap och rörelse ofta antas stå i motsats till varandra, vilket inte alls behöver vara fallet. Författaren betonar att det behövs idrott och hälsa som vänder sig till alla elever, även de som har negativa erfarenheter av att röra sig. För att kunna organisera och leda sådan undervisning krävs lärare som själva förstår, kan delta i och förändra rörelsekulturer.Boken behandlar frågor som: Vad är kunskap i idrott och hälsa? Vad innebär det att undervisa för lärande i idrott och hälsa i en målstyrd skola? Hur kan idrott och hälsa utvecklas för att möta kritiken om bristande jämställdhet och mångfald samt svårigheter att integrera elever med funktionsnedsättning?Idrott och hälsa – i går, i dag, i morgon riktar sig främst till blivande och yrkesverksamma lärare inom ämnet idrott och hälsa. Boken kan fungera som diskussionsunderlag för utveckling av undervisning och som läromedel i fortbildning av lärare och vid handledarutbildningar.

    (Förlagets text)

  • 36.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Idrottens könsmönster: “bara är så” eller “går att påverka”2018In: Resurser, representation och “riktig” idrott: om jämställdhet inom idrotten / [ed] Christine Dartsch, Johan R Norberg & Johan Faskunger, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2018, p. 57-95Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Idrottsvärlden genomsyras av könsmönster. En del idrotter lockar flickor och pojkar, kvinnor och män i lika hög utsträckning, men många lockar i stor utsträckning bara ett av könen. Hur kan vi förstå dessa mönster? Vad innebär de för deltagarna? Går de att förändra? Hur?

  • 37.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Med reflektion och samtal: en lyckad lektion2018In: Idrott & hälsa, ISSN 1653-1124, no 2, p. 26-27Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 38.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Pedagogiska perspektiv på idrott2016In: Idrottsvetenskap: en introduktion / [ed] Susanna Hedenborg, Studentlitteratur AB, 2016, 1, p. 67-88Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 39.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Undervisning för lärande i idrott och hälsa – hur kan det se ut?2016In: Idrottsforskaren: Svensk förening för beteendevetenskaplig idrottsforskning, no 1, p. 74-84Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Peterson, Tomas
    Malmö högskola.
    Quennerstedt, Mikael
    Örebro universitet.
    Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik: praktiknära idrottsdidaktik2016In: Hur är det i praktiken?: Lärare utforskar ämnet idrott och hälsa / [ed] Håkan Larsson, Suzanne Lundvall, Jane Meckbach, Tomas Peterson & Mikale Quennerstedt, Stockholm: Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH , 2016, p. 5-16Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad ska elever lära sig i idrott och hälsa? Hur lägger man upp undervisning som stödjer alla elever i deras lärande? Hur kan lärare göra likvärdiga bedömningar av elevers kunskaper? Detta är några av de frågor som behandlas i boken du nu håller i. Boken sammanfattar den forskning som genomförts inom Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik (FIHD). FIHD startade år 2011 som ett led i den statliga satsningen Lärarlyftet, där särskilda medel avsattes för genomförandet av forskarskolor för lärare och förskollärare. Deltagarna i FIHD är alla verksamma lärare i idrott och hälsa. Detta har en central betydelse i sammanhanget. Skolämnet idrott och hälsa har funnits länge i den svenska skolan, men den vetenskapliga förankringen och utforskningen av ämnet har varit svag. Den forskning som existerat har inte i första hand genomförts av, eller på initiativ av, lärare i ämnet. Initiativen har istället kommit från annat håll, ofta från olika myndigheter. Forskningsresultaten har speglat myndigheternas intressen snarare än lärarnas. Därför är det ett stort nöje att i denna bok få möjlighet att presentera forskningsresultat som bygger på lärares frågor och där lärare har varit forskare. I detta inledande kapitel presenterar FIHD:s styrgrupp, bestående av medarbetare vid Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan (GIH), Malmö högskola och Örebro universitet, bakgrunden till FIHD, den forskning som fanns till hands då lärarna påbörjade sina forskningsprojekt samt de ambitioner som varit förknippade med forskarskolan.

  • 41.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Lundvall, SuzanneSwedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.Meckbach, JaneSwedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.Peterson, TomasMalmö högskola.Quennerstedt, MikaelÖrebro universitet.
    Hur är det i praktiken?: Lärare utforskar ämnet idrott och hälsa2016Collection (editor) (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad ska elever lära sig i idrott och hälsa? Hur lägger man upp undervisning som stödjer alla elever i deras lärande? Hur kan lärare göra likvärdiga bedömningar av elevers kunskaper? Detta är några av de frågor som behandlas i denna bok. Boken sammanfattar den forskning som genomförts inom Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik (FIHD). FIHD startade år 2011 som ett led i den statliga satsningen Lärarlyftet, där särskilda medel avsattes för genomförandet av forskarskolor för lärare och förskollärare. Deltagarna i FIHD är alla verksamma lärare i idrott och hälsa. I denna bok presenterar de översiktligt resultat och slutsatser från sina olika forskningsprojekt. Kapitlen behandlar aktuella teman som lärande, hälsa, etnicitet och genus samt betyg och bedömning i idrott och hälsa.

    Boken finns fritt tillgänglig på webben.

    Innehåll:

    • Forskarskolan i idrott och hälsas didaktik: praktiknära idrottsdidaktik
    • Träffar vi alltid rätt? Elevers lärande i idrott och hälsa / Andreas Jacobsson
    • Elevers förståelse av hälsa i idrott och hälsa / Annika Ahlberg
    • Är grönsaker alltid hälsosamt? / Magnus Brolin
    • Hitta lätt – så blir det rätt! / Kerstin Nilsson
    • Dansspel som läromedel / Béatrice Gibbs
    • Dokumentation i idrott och hälsa – en omöjlig ekvation? / Rickard Håkanson
    • Passar jag in? Nyanlända ungas möte med idrott och hälsa / Åke Huitfeldt
    • Att göra tudelning – idrott och hälsa i åk 1 ur ett genusperspektiv / Inga Oliynyk
    • Bedömning för lärande (BFL) i ämnet idrott och hälsa / Björn Tolgfors
    • Vad är ”kroppslig förmåga”? Om behovet av ett yrkesspråk i idrott och hälsa / Jenny Kroon
    • Betygsättning – ett (o)möjligt uppdrag? / Izabela Seger
  • 42.
    Larsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University.
    ‘It doesn't matter how they move really, as long as they move.’ Physical education teachers on developing their students’ movement capabilities.2017In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 137-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Movement is key in physical education, but the educational value of moving is sometimes obscure. In Sweden, recent school reforms have endeavoured to introduce social constructionist concepts of knowledge and learning into physical education, where the movement capabilities of students are in focus. However, this means introducing a host of new and untested concepts to the physical education teacher community. Purpose. The purpose of this article is to explore how Swedish physical education teachers reason about helping their students develop movement capability. Participants, setting and research design. The data are taken from a research project conducted in eight Swedish secondary schools called ‘Physical education and health – a subject for learning?’ in which students and teachers were interviewed and physical education lessons were video-recorded. This article draws on data from interviews with the eight participating teachers, five men and three women. The teachers were interviewed partly using a stimulated recall technique where the teachers were asked to comment on video clips from physical education lessons where they themselves act as teachers. Data analysis. A discourse analysis was conducted with a particular focus on the ensemble of more or less regulated, deliberate and finalised ways of doing things that characterise the eight teachers’ approach to helping the students develop their movement capabilities. Findings. The interviews indicate that anactivation discourse(‘trying out’ and ‘being active’) dominates the teachers’ ways of reasoning about their task (a focal discourse). When the teachers were specifically asked about how they can help the students improve their movement capacities, asport discourse(a referential discourse) was expressed. This discourse, which is based on the standards of excellence of different sports, conditions what the teachers see as (im)possible to do due to time limitations and a wish not to criticise the students publicly. The mandated holisticsocial constructionist discourseabout knowledge and learning becomes obscure (an intruder discourse) in the sense that the teachers interpret it from the point of view of a dualist discourse, where ‘knowledge’ (theory) and ‘skill’ (practice) are divided. Conclusions. Physical education teachers recoil from the task of developing the students’ movement capabilities due to certain conditions ofimpossibility related to the discursive terrain they are moving in. The teachers see as their primary objective the promotion of physical activity – now and in the future; they conceptualise movement capability in such a way that emphasising the latter would jeopardise their possibilities of realising the primary objective. Should the aim be to reinforce the social constructionist national curriculum, where capability to move is suggested to be an attempt at formulating a concept of knowledge that includes both propositional and procedural aspects and which is not based on the standards of excellence of either sport techniques or motor ability, then teachers will need support to interpret the national curriculum from a social constructionist perspective. Further, alternative standards of excellence as well as a vocabulary for articulating these will have to be developed. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR

  • 43.
    Linghede, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Heteronormativitet och gränsöverskridanden inom elitidrotten2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Förord:

    Idrottsrörelsen är öppen för alla. Men alla känner sig inte välkomna. Vi vet från tidigare studier att hbtq-personer idrottar i mindre utsträckning än hetero-personer. Men det finns få undersökningar som beskriver och förklarar varför det är så.

    Om vi dessutom intresserar oss specifikt för elitidrottare så är kunskapen än mer bristfällig. Elitidrottare har förutom att förhålla sig till de normer som finns i den egna idrotten och föreningen också en medial uppmärksamhet och ett internationellt sammanhang som påverkar.

    För att visa den komplexa verkligheten har Eva Linghede i den här rapporten valt att arbeta med en narrativ, berättande, forskningsmetod. Du möter fem fiktiva elitidrottare som genom sina erfarenheter ger kött och blod till hur det kan vara att som (elit)idrottare inte tillhöra normen.

    Ett ovanligt men mycket bra sätt att föra ut kunskap från vetenskapen till praktikerna, det vill säga till våra tränare och ledare som är med och skapar och vidmakthåller de normer som finns.

    Rapporten lyfter även fram enkla redskap som du och jag kan använda i vårt ledarskap för att vidga normen. Då kan fler inte bara få vara med, utan de kan vara sig själva också – fullt ut.

    Peter Mattsson

    Idrottschef

    Riksidrottsförbundet

  • 44.
    Linghede, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    The promise of glitching bodies in sport: a posthumanist exploration of an intersex phenomenon2018In: Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, ISSN 2159-676X, E-ISSN 2159-6778, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 570-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is about glitching bodies - bodies that break, crash and confuse the conventions of pre-programmed and binary gender patterns. Exploring the promise of an intersex phenomenon; hyperandrogenism in women's sport, I discuss how glitching bodies and a feminist posthumanist understanding of gender can contribute to the field of gender and queer sport studies. Responding to calls for research enacting how non-binary bodies challenge the dualistic gendered ontologies that have structured the performative practices of sport in highly exclusive ways this paper is a travelogue into a messy nature-cultural phenomenon. It is partly a theoretical and methodological exploration and partly an analytic endeavour. The phenomenon of hyperandrogenism is explored and untangled by engaging in a diffractive analysis where I 'plug in' the concepts of intra-activity and glitch. I argue that a feminist posthumanist understanding of gender and diffraction as a methodological practice helps us move away from habitual and normative readings that zero in on either male or female, either nature or culture and either material or discursive. This implosion of binaries in turn opens up for alternative ways of thinking and being bodies in sport (studies).

  • 45.
    Linghede, Eva
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Figuring More Livable Elsewheres: Queering Acts, Moments, and Spaces in Sport (Studies)2017In: Journal of Sport and Social Issues, ISSN 0193-7235, E-ISSN 1552-7638, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 290-306Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Inspired by calls for an emphasis on the "potentiality of the present" in feminist and queer (sport) studies, this article explores queering acts, moments, and spaces in stories of athletes living nonstraight. To do this, we use Haraway's and Braidotti's notion of figuration and creative analytical writing. With one foot rooted in what is, our three figurations of the queering athlete take us into and beyond heteronormativity to what can be(come). Two figurations enact how sex segregation and gender norms in sports can serve as conditions of possibilities that open up for other-worlds-in-the-making and the third works sexuality against identity and queers the hetero–homo binary. They are figurations—in form and content—of a "science of the possibility of science."

  • 46.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Avhandling som på ett intressant sätt väver samman olika sociologiska perspektiv på mäns tal om och förståelse av hälsa, kropp och fysisk aktivitet: recension av avhandlingen “I have a pacemaker and hip replacement, but I’m up and running”: Rural Norwegian men’s meanings related to health, body and physical activity av Stein Egil Kolderup Hervik2018In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, article id 15 marsArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Gender dynamics in the making and breaking of a female PETE culture in Sweden2016In: The Female Tradition in Physical Education: Women First reconsidered / [ed] David Kirk, Patricia Vertinsky, Routledge, 2016, p. 153-169Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Intressant som kunskapsbank, men provokativ utifrån ett nordiskt perspektiv: Recension av boken Health and Elite Sport: Is High Performance Sport a Healthy Pursuit? / Joseph Baker, Parissa Safai & Jessica Fraser-Thomas (red). Routledge 20152016In: Idrottsforum.org/Nordic sport science forum, ISSN 1652-7224, no 7 aprilArticle, book review (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Barker, Dean
    Institutionen för kost- och idrottsvetenskap vid Göteborgs universitet..
    The Swedish model for sport, recreation and health in times of change - a sustainable contract with the family of sport?2016In: Families, Young People, Physical Activity and Health: Critical Perspectives / [ed] Symeon Dagkas, Lisette Burrows, Routledge, 2016, p. 194-207Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The newly-elected Swedish minister of public health and sports, Gabriel Wikström is holding his first official speech to the Swedish Sports Confederation at a Sports Forum. Wikström is a social democrat and 29 years old. He has one message: that the sports movement should help decrease existing health gaps in society. The audience looks somewhat puzzled; what has organized sport to do with health gaps? After the minister has left, a strategic discussion starts about the sports movement’s assignment. Few of the delegates from the different sports federations rate the promotion of health as their main target. Instead, they are interested in attracting new members, keeping adolescents in sport longer, and securing the existence of non profitable clubs as the foundation for a united popular movement vis-à-vis political decision-makers. The speech of the sports minister points, on the one hand, to the expectations from the state on how organized sports and the Swedish Sports Confederation (Riksidrottsförbundet, RF) can promote public health. On the other hand it also points to concerns about public health and physical activity brought about by changes in society, neo liberal discourses and a strong belief in individual and market forces.

  • 50.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Brun Sundblad, Gunilla
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
    Polarisering av ungas idrottande2017In: De aktiva och de inaktiva: om ungas rörelse i skola och på fritid / [ed] Christine Dartsch, Johan R Norberg & Johan Pihlblad, Stockholm: Centrum för idrottsforskning , 2017, p. 45-75Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Skillnaderna i fysisk aktivitet mellan svenska skolelever är stora. Cirka 20 procent idrottar inte alls på fritiden, en lika stor andel är mycket aktiva. En stor majoritet deltar på lektionerna i idrott och hälsa. En procent väljer att inte alls vara med. Hur resonerar unga om idrott, träning och ämnet idrott och hälsa och vad kännetecknar olika elevgrupper?

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