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  • 1. Bonnard, M
    et al.
    Sirin, A V
    Oddsson, L
    Thorstensson, Alf
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Different strategies to compensate for the effects of fatigue revealed by neuromuscular adaptation processes in humans.1994In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 166, no 1, p. 101-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An initially submaximal hopping task was maintained with the same global power output until it became the maximal performance; since there was no decrease in performance, any change in behavior occurring with fatigue characterizes the strategies allowing to compensate for the effects of fatigue. In a prolonged hopping task, fatigue is likely to be most prominent in the ankle extensor muscles since they are the main contributors to vertical propulsion in the hop. With fatigue, all subjects landed with more flexed knees and with an increased activity in the biarticular rectus femoris muscle indicating some compensation between the knee and ankle joint. Furthermore, two different strategies appeared to further compensate for the important fatigue of the ankle extensor muscles: one was organized across joints and consisted in a heavier reliance of the knee extensor vastus lateralis, and the other was organized within the fatigued joint and consisted in an earlier preactivation of the gastrocnemius. As a consequence, two different adaptations of the ground reaction force profiles appeared at the end of the session; each being related to one of these two strategies.

  • 2.
    Nordlund Ekblom, Maria M
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Thorstensson, Alf
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Cresswell, Andrew G
    Conditioning Ia-afferent stimulation reduces the soleus Hoffman reflex in humans when muscle spindles are assumed to be inactive.2004In: Neuroscience Letters, ISSN 0304-3940, E-ISSN 1872-7972, Vol. 366, no 3, p. 250-3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite higher neural activation during active as compared to passive muscle shortening, Hoffman reflexes (H-reflexes) are similar. This may be explained by homosynaptic post-activation depression (HPAD) of Ia-afferents being present during active shortening. Accordingly, it was investigated whether conditioning electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve reduced the H-reflex less during active than passive shortening. The effects of two conditioning modes (0.2 and 1 Hz) were compared to a control mode without conditioning. H-reflexes and M-waves were elicited as the ankle passed 90 degrees with the soleus muscle undergoing passive or active (20% MVC) lengthening or shortening. Conditioning had no effect during active shortening. In contrast, during passive shortening, the H:M of the 1 Hz mode was significantly less than that of the 0.2 Hz and control modes. In lengthening, H:M was unaffected by conditioning. These findings support that HPAD reduces the synaptic efficacy of Ia-afferents during active shortening, active and passive lengthening, but not passive shortening.

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