Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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  • 1.
    Freak-Poli, Rosanne
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Wagemaker, Nina
    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Wang, Rui
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lysen, Thom S.
    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Ikram, M. Arfan
    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands;Department of Neurology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands;Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Vernooij, Meike W.
    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands;Department of Radiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands.
    Dintica, Christina S.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Vernooij-Dassen, Myrra
    Radboud University Medical Center, IQ Healthcare, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Melis, Rene J.M.
    Department of Geriatric Medicine, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
    Laukka, Erica J.
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Fratiglioni, Laura
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Xu, Weili
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tiemeier, Henning
    Department of Epidemiology, Erasmus Medical Center, Rotterdam, The Netherlands;Department of Social and Behavioral Science, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
    Loneliness, Not Social Support, Is Associated with Cognitive Decline and Dementia Across Two Longitudinal Population-Based Cohorts2022In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 295-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Poor social health is likely associated with cognitive decline and risk of dementia; however, studies show inconsistent results. Additionally, few studies separate social health components or control for mental health.

    Objective: To investigate whether loneliness and social support are independently associated with cognitive decline and risk of dementia, and whether depressive symptoms confound the association.

    Methods: We included 4,514 participants from the population-based Rotterdam Study (RS; aged 71±7SD years) followed up to 14 years (median 10.8, interquartile range 7.4-11.6), and 2,112 participants from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K; aged 72±10SD years) followed up to 10 years (mean 5.9±1.6SD). At baseline, participants were free of major depression and scored on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) ≥26 for RS and ≥25 for SNAC-K. We investigated loneliness, perceived social support, and structural social support (specifically marital status and number of children). In both cohorts, dementia was diagnosed and cognitive function was repeatedly assessed with MMSE and a global cognitive factor (g-factor).

    Results: Loneliness was prospectively associated with a decline in the MMSE in both cohorts. Consistently, persons who were lonely had an increased risk of developing dementia (RS: HR 1.34, 95%CI 1.08-1.67; SNAC-K: HR 2.16, 95%CI 1.12-4.17). Adjustment for depressive symptoms and exclusion of the first 5 years of follow-up did not alter results. Neither perceived or structural social support was associated with cognitive decline or dementia risk.

    Conclusion: Loneliness, not social support, predicted cognitive decline and incident dementia independently of depressive symptoms.

  • 2.
    Larsson, Liss Elin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. Theme Inflammation and Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Rui
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.; Wisconsin Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI, USA..
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Theme Inflammation and Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden..
    Wiggenraad, Fleur
    Theme Inflammation and Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.; Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Rydén, Marie
    Theme Inflammation and Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hagman, Göran
    Theme Inflammation and Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.; Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Hellénius, Mai-Lis
    Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kivipelto, Miia
    Theme Inflammation and Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.; Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.; Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland.: The Ageing Epidemiology Research Unit, School of Public Health, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom..
    Thunborg, Charlotta
    Theme Inflammation and Aging, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.; Department of Neurobiology, Division of Clinical Geriatrics, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.; Mälardalen University Department of Health and Welfare, Sweden.; Department of Caring Sciences, Faculty of Health and Occupational Studies, University of Gävle, Sweden..
    Association of Sarcopenia and Its Defining Components with the Degree of Cognitive Impairment in a Memory Clinic Population.2023In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 96, no 2, p. 777-788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Sarcopenia and cognitive impairment are two leading causes of disabilities.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the prevalence of sarcopenia and investigate the association between sarcopenia diagnostic components (muscle strength, muscle mass, and physical performance) and cognitive impairment in memory clinic patients.

    METHODS: 368 patients were included (age 59.0±7.25 years, women: 58.7%), displaying three clinical phenotypes of cognitive impairments, i.e., subjective cognitive impairment (SCI, 57%), mild cognitive impairment (MCI, 26%), and Alzheimer's disease (AD, 17%). Sarcopenia was defined according to diagnostic algorithm recommended by the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People. Components of sarcopenia were grip strength, bioelectrical impedance analysis, and gait speed. They were further aggregated into a score (0-3 points) by counting the numbers of limited components. Multi-nominal logistic regression was applied.

    RESULTS: Probable sarcopenia (i.e., reduced grip strength) was observed in 9.6% of the patients, and 3.5% were diagnosed with sarcopenia. Patients with faster gait speed showed less likelihood of MCI (odds ratio [OR]: 0.24, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.06-0.90) and AD (OR: 0.12, 95% CI: 0.03-0.60). One or more limited sarcopenia components was associated with worse cognitive function. After adjusting for potential confounders, the association remained significant only for AD (OR 4.29, 95% CI 1.45-11.92).

    CONCLUSION: The results indicate a connection between the sarcopenia components and cognitive impairments. Limitations in the sarcopenia measures, especially slow walking speed, were related to poorer cognitive outcomes. More investigationsare required to further verify the causal relationship between sarcopenia and cognitive outcomes.

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  • 3.
    Liang, Yajun
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiology, Aging Research Center and Center for Alzheimer Research, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet-Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden ; Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Gao, Ya
    Department of Neurology, Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China..
    Wang, Rui
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. Department of Neurobiology, Aging Research Center and Center for Alzheimer Research, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet-Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Grande, Giulia
    Department of Neurobiology, Aging Research Center and Center for Alzheimer Research, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet-Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Monastero, Roberto
    Department of Biomedicine, Neuroscience and Advanced Diagnostics, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy..
    Dong, Yanhong
    Department of Neurology, Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China..
    Jiang, Xin
    Department of Neurology, Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China..
    Lv, Peiyuan
    Department of Neurology, Hebei General Hospital, Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China..
    Qiu, Chengxuan
    Department of Neurobiology, Aging Research Center and Center for Alzheimer Research, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet-Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Migraine, Cognitive Decline, and Dementia in Older Adults: A Population-Based Study.2022In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 88, no 1, p. 263-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The potential impact of migraine on cognitive aging among older adults remains controversial.

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relationship of migraine and subtypes with cognitive decline and dementia in an older Swedish population.

    METHODS: This population-based study included 3069 participants (age≥60) from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen, Stockholm. Baseline examination was conducted in 2001-2004, and participants were followed every 3 or 6 years until 2013-2016. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews, clinical examinations, laboratory tests, and linkage with registers. Global cognitive function was measured with the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Dementia was diagnosed according to the DSM-IV criteria. Migraine and subtypes were defined following the international classification system. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, Cox regression, and linear mixed-effects models.

    RESULTS: At baseline, 305 participants were defined with non-migraine headache and 352 with migraine. The cross-sectional analysis showed that the multivariable-adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of prevalent dementia was 0.49 (0.20-1.21) for migraine and 0.66 (0.26-1.66) for migraine without aura. The longitudinal analysis showed that the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios of incident dementia associated with migraine and subtypes ranged 0.68-0.89 (p > 0.05). Furthermore, migraine and subtypes were not significantly associated with either baseline MMSE score or MMSE changes during follow-ups (p > 0.05). The nonsignificant associations did not vary substantially by age, APOEɛ4 allele, cerebrovascular disease, and antimigraine treatment (p for interactions > 0.05).

    CONCLUSION: This study shows no evidence supporting the associations of migraine and its subtypes with cognitive decline and dementia among older adults.

  • 4.
    Speh, Andreja
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Wang, Rui
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physical Activity and Health. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Stockholm University, Sweden; University of Wisconsin, USA.
    Winblad, Bengt
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kramberger, M G
    Univ Med Ctr Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Backman, Lars
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Qiu, C X
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Laukka, E J
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Relationship Between Cardiovascular Health and Rate of Cognitive Decline in Young-Old and Old-Old Adults: A Population-Based Study2021In: Journal of Alzheimer's Disease, ISSN 1387-2877, E-ISSN 1875-8908, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 1523-1537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Modifiable vascular risk factors have been associated with late-life cognitive impairment. The Life Simple 7 (LS7) score comprises seven cardiovascular health metrics: smoking, diet, physical activity, body mass index, plasma glucose, total serum cholesterol, and blood pressure. Objective: To investigate the association between individual and composite LS7 metrics and rate of cognitive decline, and potential differences in these associations between young-old and old-old individuals. Methods: This cohort study included 1,950 participants aged >= 60 years (M= 70.7 years) from the Swedish National Study on Aging and Care-Kungsholmen (SNAC-K), who underwent repeated neuropsychological testing (episodic and semantic memory, verbal fluency, processing speed, global cognition) across 12 years. The LS7 score was assessed at baseline and categorized as poor, intermediate, or optimal. Level and change in cognitive performance as a function of LS7 categories were estimated using linear mixed-effects models. Results: Having an optimal LS7 total score was associated with better performance (expressed in standard deviation units) at baseline for perceptual speed (beta=0.21, 95% CI 0.12-0.29), verbal fluency (beta=0.08, 0.00-0.16), and global cognition (beta = 0.06, 0.00-0.12) compared to the poor group. Age-stratified analyses revealed associations for cognitive level and change only in the young-old (< 78 years) group. For the specific metrics, diverging patterns were observed for young-old and old-old individuals. Conclusion: Meeting the LS7 criteria for ideal cardiovascular health in younger old age is associated with slower rate of cognitive decline. However, the LS7 criteria may have a different meaning for cognitive function in very old adults.

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