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  • 1.
    Apró, William
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Moberg, Marcus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Hamilton, L.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    van Hall, G.
    Holmberg, HC
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Resistance exercise induced S6K1 kinase activity is not inhibited in human skeletal muscle despite prior activation of AMPK by high intensity interval cycling.2015In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 308, no 6, p. E470-E481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Combining endurance and strength training in the same session has been reported to reduce the anabolic response to the latter form of exercise. The underlying mechanism, based primarily on results from rodent muscle, is proposed to involve AMPK-dependent inhibition of mTORC1 signaling. This hypothesis was tested in eight trained male subjects who in a randomized order performed either resistance exercise only (R) or interval cycling followed by resistance exercise (ER). Biopsies taken from the vastus lateralis before and after endurance exercise and repeatedly after resistance exercise were assessed for glycogen content, kinase activity, protein phosphorylation and gene expression. Mixed muscle fractional synthetic rate was measured at rest and during 3h of recovery using the stable isotope technique. In ER, AMPK activity was elevated immediately after both endurance and resistance exercise (~90%, P<0.05) but was unchanged in R. Thr389 phosphorylation of S6K1 was increased several-fold immediately after exercise (P<0.05) in both trials and increased further throughout recovery. After 90 and 180 min recovery, S6K1 activity was elevated (~55% and ~110%, respectively, P<0.05) and eEF2 phosphorylation was reduced (~55%, P<0.05) with no difference between trials. In contrast, markers for protein catabolism were differently influenced by the two modes of exercise; ER induced a significant increase in gene and protein expression of MuRF1 (P<0.05), which was not observed following R exercise only. In conclusion, cycling-induced elevation in AMPK activity does not inhibit mTORC1 signaling after subsequent resistance exercise, but may instead interfere with the hypertrophic response by influencing key components in protein breakdown.

  • 2.
    Apró, William
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Wang, Li
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Pontén, Marjan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Resistance exercise induced mTORC1 signaling is not impaired by subsequent endurance exercise in human skeletal muscle.2013In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 305, no 1, p. E22-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current dogma is that the muscle adaptation to resistance exercise is blunted when combined with endurance exercise. The suggested mechanism (based on rodent experiments) is that activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) during endurance exercise impairs muscle growth through inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1). The purpose of this study was to investigate potential interference of endurance training on the signaling pathway of resistance training [mTORC1 phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1)] in human muscle. Ten healthy and moderately trained male subjects performed on two separate occasions either acute high-intensity and high-volume resistance exercise (leg press, R) or R followed by 30 min of cycling (RE). Muscle biopsies were collected before and 1 and 3 h post resistance exercise. Phosphorylation of mTOR (Ser(2448)) increased 2-fold (P < 0.05) and that of S6K1 (Thr(389)) 14-fold (P < 0.05), with no difference between R and RE. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2, Thr(56)) was reduced ∼70% during recovery in both trials (P < 0.05). An interesting finding was that phosphorylation of AMPK (Thr(172)) and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC, Ser(79)) decreased ∼30% and ∼50%, respectively, 3 h postexercise (P < 0.05). Proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1 (PGC-1α) mRNA increased more after RE (6.5-fold) than after R (4-fold) (RE vs. R: P < 0.01) and was the only gene expressed differently between trials. These data show that the signaling of muscle growth through the mTORC1-S6K1 axis after heavy resistance exercise is not inhibited by subsequent endurance exercise. It is also suggested that prior activation of mTORC1 signaling may repress subsequent phosphorylation of AMPK.

  • 3. Bishop, David J
    et al.
    Thomas, Claire
    Moore-Morris, Tom
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Mercier, Jacques
    Sodium bicarbonate ingestion prior to training improves mitochondrial adaptations in rats.2010In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 299, no 2, p. E225-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We tested the hypothesis that reducing hydrogen ion accumulation during training would result in greater improvements in muscle oxidative capacity and time to exhaustion (TTE). Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups (CON, PLA, and BIC). CON served as a sedentary control, whereas PLA ingested water and BIC ingested sodium bicarbonate 30 min prior to every training session. Training consisted of seven to twelve 2-min intervals performed five times/wk for 5 wk. Following training, TTE was significantly greater in BIC (81.2 +/- 24.7 min) compared with PLA (53.5 +/- 30.4 min), and TTE for both groups was greater than CON (6.5 +/- 2.5 min). Fiber respiration was determined in the soleus (SOL) and extensor digitorum longus (EDL), with either pyruvate (Pyr) or palmitoyl carnitine (PC) as substrates. Compared with CON (14.3 +/- 2.6 nmol O(2).min(-1).mg dry wt(-1)), there was a significantly greater SOL-Pyr state 3 respiration in both PLA (19.6 +/- 3.0 nmol O(2).min(-1).mg dry wt(-1)) and BIC (24.4 +/- 2.8 nmol O(2).min(-1).mg dry wt(-1)), with a significantly greater value in BIC. However, state 3 respiration was significantly lower in the EDL from both trained groups compared with CON. These differences remained significant in the SOL, but not the EDL, when respiration was corrected for citrate synthase activity (an indicator of mitochondrial mass). These novel findings suggest that reducing muscle hydrogen ion accumulation during running training is associated with greater improvements in both mitochondrial mass and mitochondrial respiration in the soleus.

  • 4.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Saltin, Bengt
    BCAA intake affects protein metabolism in muscle after but not during exercise in humans.2001In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 281, no 2, p. E365-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) or a placebo was given to seven subjects during 1 h of ergometer cycle exercise and a 2-h recovery period. Intake of BCAA did not influence the rate of exchange of the aromatic amino acids, tyrosine and phenylalanine, in the legs during exercise or the increase in their concentration in muscle. The increase was approximately 30% in both conditions. On the other hand, in the recovery period after exercise, a faster decrease in the muscle concentration of aromatic amino acids was found in the BCAA experiment (46% compared with 25% in the placebo condition). There was also a tendency to a smaller release (an average of 32%) of these amino acids from the legs during the 2-h recovery. The results suggest that BCAA have a protein-sparing effect during the recovery after exercise, either that protein synthesis has been stimulated and/or protein degradation has decreased, but the data during exercise are too variable to make any conclusions about the effects during exercise. The effect in the recovery period does not seem to be mediated by insulin.

  • 5.
    Borgenvik, Marcus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Apró, William
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Intake of branched-chain amino acids influences the levels of MAFbx mRNA and MuRF-1 total protein in resting and exercising human muscle.2012In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 302, no 5, p. E510-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resistance exercise and amino acids are two major factors that influence muscle protein turnover. Here, we examined the effects of resistance exercise and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), individually and in combination, on the expression of anabolic and catabolic genes in human skeletal muscle. Seven subjects performed two sessions of unilateral leg press exercise with randomized supplementation with BCAA or flavored water. Biopsies were collected from the vastus lateralis muscle of both the resting and exercising legs before and repeatedly after exercise to determine levels of mRNA, protein phosphorylation, and amino acid concentrations. Intake of BCAA reduced (P < 0.05) MAFbx mRNA by 30 and 50% in the resting and exercising legs, respectively. The level of MuRF-1 mRNA was elevated (P < 0.05) in the exercising leg two- and threefold under the placebo and BCAA conditions, respectively, whereas MuRF-1 total protein increased by 20% (P < 0.05) only in the placebo condition. Phosphorylation of p70(S6k) increased to a larger extent (∼2-fold; P < 0.05) in the early recovery period with BCAA supplementation, whereas the expression of genes regulating mTOR activity was not influenced by BCAA. Muscle levels of phenylalanine and tyrosine were reduced (13-17%) throughout recovery (P < 0.05) in the placebo condition and to a greater extent (32-43%; P < 0.05) following BCAA supplementation in both resting and exercising muscle. In conclusion, BCAA ingestion reduced MAFbx mRNA and prevented the exercise-induced increase in MuRF-1 total protein in both resting and exercising leg. Further-more, resistance exercise differently influenced MAFbx and MuRF-1 mRNA expression, suggesting both common and divergent regulation of these two ubiquitin ligases.

  • 6.
    Eliasson, Jörgen
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Elfegoun, Thibault
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Johnny
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Köhnke, Rickard
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Maximal lengthening contractions increase p70 S6 kinase phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle in the absence of nutritional supply.2006In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 291, no 6, p. 1197-1205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to compare the training stimuli of eccentric (lengthening) and concentric (shortening) contractions regarding the effect on signaling enzymes involved in protein synthesis. Ten male subjects performed 4 x 6 maximal eccentric contractions on one leg followed by 4 x 6 maximal concentric contractions on the other. Six additional subjects performed the same protocol, but with maximal concentric and submaximal eccentric exercise of equal force to that of the maximal concentric contractions. Muscle biopsy samples were taken from the vastus lateralis before, immediately after, and 1 and 2 h after exercise in both legs. The average peak force produced during the maximal eccentric exercise was 31% higher than during the maximal concentric exercise, 2,490 (+/-100) vs. 1,894 (+/-108) N (P < 0.05). The maximal eccentric contractions led to two- to eightfold increases in the phosphorylation of p70 S6 kinase (p70(S6k)) and the ribosomal protein S6 that persisted for 2 h into recovery but no significant changes in phosphorylation of Akt or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Maximal concentric and submaximal eccentric contractions did not induce any significant changes in Akt, mTOR, p70(S6k), or S6 phosphorylation up to 2 h after the exercise. The results indicate that one session of maximal eccentric contractions activates p70(S6k) in human muscle via an Akt-independent pathway and suggest that maximal eccentric contractions are more effective than maximal concentric contractions in stimulating protein synthesis in the absence of a nutritional intake, an effect that may be mediated through a combination of greater tension and stretching of the muscle.

  • 7.
    Frank, Per
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Katz, Abram
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Andersson, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Acute exercise reverses starvation-mediated insulin resistance in humans.2013In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 304, no 4, p. E436-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within 2-3 days of starvation, pronounced insulin resistance develops, possibly mediated by increased lipid load. Here, we show that one exercise bout increases mitochondrial fatty acid (FA) oxidation and reverses starvation-induced insulin resistance. Nine healthy subjects underwent 75-h starvation on two occasions: with no exercise (NE) or with one exercise session at the end of the starvation period (EX). Muscle biopsies were analyzed for mitochondrial function, contents of glycogen, and phosphorylation of regulatory proteins. Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, measured with an intravenous glucose tolerance test (IVGTT), were impaired after starvation, but in EX the response was attenuated or abolished. Glycogen stores were reduced, and plasma FA was increased in both conditions, with a more pronounced effect in EX. After starvation, mitochondrial respiration decreased with complex I substrate (NE and EX), but in EX there was an increased respiration with complex I + II substrate. EX altered regulatory proteins associated with increases in glucose disposal (decreased phosphorylation of glycogen synthase), glucose transport (increased phosphorylation of Akt substrate of 160 kDa), and FA oxidation (increased phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase). In conclusion, exercise reversed starvation-induced insulin resistance and was accompanied by reduced glycogen stores, increased lipid oxidation capacity, and activation of signaling proteins involved in glucose transport and FA metabolism.

  • 8. Karlsson, Håkan K R
    et al.
    Nilsson, Per-Anders
    Nilsson, Johnny
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Chibalin, Alexander V
    Zierath, Juleen R
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Branched-chain amino acids increase p70S6k phosphorylation in human skeletal muscle after resistance exercise.2004In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 287, no 1, p. E1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of resistance exercise alone or in combination with oral intake of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) on phosphorylation of the 70-kDa S6 protein kinase (p70(S6k)) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2), and p38 MAPK in skeletal muscle. Seven male subjects performed one session of quadriceps muscle resistance training (4 x 10 repetitions at 80% of one repetition maximum) on two occasions. In a randomized order, double-blind, crossover test, subjects ingested a solution of BCAA or placebo during and after exercise. Ingestion of BCAA increased plasma concentrations of isoleucine, leucine, and valine during exercise and throughout recovery after exercise (2 h postexercise), whereas no change was noted after the placebo trial. Resistance exercise led to a robust increase in p70(S6k) phosphorylation at Ser(424) and/or Thr(421), which persisted 1 and 2 h after exercise. BCAA ingestion further enhanced p70(S6k) phosphorylation 3.5-fold during recovery. p70(S6k) phosphorylation at Thr(389) was unaltered directly after resistance exercise. However, during recovery, Thr(389) phosphorylation was profoundly increased, but only during the BCAA trial. Furthermore, phosphorylation of the ribosomal protein S6 was also increased in the recovery period only during the BCAA trial. Exercise led to a marked increase in ERK1/2 and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, which was completely suppressed upon recovery and unaltered by BCAA. In conclusion, BCAA, ingested during and after resistance exercise, mediate signal transduction through p70(S6k) in skeletal muscle.

  • 9.
    Mascher, Henrik
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Tannerstedt, Jörgen
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Brink-Elfegoun, Thibault
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Repeated resistance exercise training induces different changes in mRNA expression of MAFbx and MuRF-1 in human skeletal muscle.2008In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 294, no 1, p. E43-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The gain in muscle mass as a result of resistance training is dependent on changes in both anabolic and catabolic reactions. A frequency of two to three exercise sessions per week is considered optimal for muscle gain in untrained individuals. Our hypothesis was that a second exercise session would enlarge the anabolic response and/or decrease the catabolic response. Eight male subjects performed resistance exercise on two occasions separated by 2 days. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 15 min, 1 h, and 2 h after exercise. Exercise led to severalfold increases in phosphorylation of mTOR at Ser2448, p70 S6 kinase (p70S6k) at Ser424/Thr421 and Thr389, and ribosomal protein S6, which persisted for up to 2 h of recovery on both occasions. There was a tendency toward a larger effect of the second exercise on p70S6k and S6, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. The mRNA expression of MuRF-1, which increased after exercise, was 30% lower after the second exercise session than after the first one. MAFbx expression was not altered after exercise but downregulated 30% 48 h later, whereas myostatin expression was reduced by 45% after the first exercise and remained low until after the second exercise session. The results indicate that 1) changes in expression of genes involved in protein degradation are attenuated as a response to repetitive resistance training with minor additional increases in enzymes regulating protein synthesis and 2) the two ubiquitin ligases, MuRF-1 and MAFbx, are differently affected by the exercise as well as by repeated exercise.

  • 10. Nielsen, Joachim
    et al.
    Mogensen, Martin
    Vind, Birgitte F
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Højlund, Kurt
    Schrøder, Henrik D
    Ortenblad, Niels
    Increased subsarcolemmal lipids in type 2 diabetes: effect of training on localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen in sedentary human skeletal muscle.2010In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 298, no 3, p. E706-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of aerobic training and type 2 diabetes on intramyocellular localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen. Obese type 2 diabetic patients (n = 12) and matched obese controls (n = 12) participated in aerobic cycling training for 10 wk. Endurance-trained athletes (n = 15) were included for comparison. Insulin action was determined by euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp. Intramyocellular contents of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen at different subcellular compartments were assessed by transmission electron microscopy in biopsies obtained from vastus lateralis muscle. Type 2 diabetic patients were more insulin resistant than obese controls and had threefold higher volume of subsarcolemmal (SS) lipids compared with obese controls and endurance-trained subjects. No difference was found in intermyofibrillar lipids. Importantly, following aerobic training, this excess SS lipid volume was lowered by approximately 50%, approaching the levels observed in the nondiabetic subjects. A strong inverse association between insulin sensitivity and SS lipid volume was found (r(2)=0.62, P = 0.002). The volume density and localization of mitochondria and glycogen were the same in type 2 diabetic patients and control subjects, and showed in parallel with improved insulin sensitivity a similar increase in response to training, however, with a more pronounced increase in SS mitochondria and SS glycogen than in other localizations. In conclusion, this study, estimating intramyocellular localization of lipids, mitochondria, and glycogen, indicates that type 2 diabetic patients may be exposed to increased levels of SS lipids. Thus consideration of cell compartmentation may advance the understanding of the role of lipids in muscle function and type 2 diabetes.

  • 11.
    Samuelsson, Hedvig
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Moberg, Marcus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Apró, William
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Intake of branched-chain or essential amino acids attenuates the elevation in muscle levels of PGC-1α4 mRNA caused by resistance exercise.2016In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 311, no 1, p. E246-E251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transcriptional co-activator PGC-1α is recognized as the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis. However, recently a novel isoform, PGC-1α4 that specifically regulates muscle hypertrophy was discovered. Since stimulation of mTORC1 activity is tightly coupled to hypertrophy, we hypothesized that activation of this pathway would upregulate PGC-1α4. Eight male subjects performed heavy resistance exercise (10 x 8-12 repetitions at ~75% of 1RM in leg press) on four different occasions, ingesting in random order a solution containing essential amino acids (EAA), branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), leucine or flavored water (placebo) during and after the exercise. Biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis muscle before and immediately after exercise, as well as following 90 and 180 min of recovery. Signaling through mTORC1, as reflected in S6K1 phosphorylation, was stimulated to a greater extent by the EAA and BCAA than the leucine or placebo supplements. Unexpectedly, intake of EAA or BCAA attenuated the stimulatory effect of exercise on PGC-1α4 expression by ~50% (from a 10-fold to 5-fold increase with BCAA and EAA, P<0.05) 3 h after exercise, whereas intake of leucine alone did not reduce this response. The 60% increase (P<0.05) in the level of PGC-1α1 mRNA 90 min after exercise was uninfluenced by amino acid intake. Muscle glycogen levels were reduced and AMPKα2 activity and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK enhanced to the same extent with all four supplements. In conclusion, induction of PGC-1α4 does not appear to regulate the nutritional (BCAA or EAA) mediated activation of mTORC1 in human muscle.

  • 12.
    Van Hall, Gerrit
    et al.
    The Copenhagen Muscle Research Centre, Rigshospitalet, 2200 Copenhagen N, Denmark.
    Jensen-Urstad, Mats
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Holmberg, H-C
    Saltin, Bengt
    Calbet, J A L
    Leg and arm lactate and substrate kinetics during exercise.2003In: American Journal of Physiology. Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0193-1849, E-ISSN 1522-1555, Vol. 284, no 1, p. E193-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To study the role of muscle mass and muscle activity on lactate and energy kinetics during exercise, whole body and limb lactate, glucose, and fatty acid fluxes were determined in six elite cross-country skiers during roller-skiing for 40 min with the diagonal stride (Continuous Arm + Leg) followed by 10 min of double poling and diagonal stride at 72-76% maximal O(2) uptake. A high lactate appearance rate (R(a), 184 +/- 17 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) but a low arterial lactate concentration ( approximately 2.5 mmol/l) were observed during Continuous Arm + Leg despite a substantial net lactate release by the arm of approximately 2.1 mmol/min, which was balanced by a similar net lactate uptake by the leg. Whole body and limb lactate oxidation during Continuous Arm + Leg was approximately 45% at rest and approximately 95% of disappearance rate and limb lactate uptake, respectively. Limb lactate kinetics changed multiple times when exercise mode was changed. Whole body glucose and glycerol turnover was unchanged during the different skiing modes; however, limb net glucose uptake changed severalfold. In conclusion, the arterial lactate concentration can be maintained at a relatively low level despite high lactate R(a) during exercise with a large muscle mass because of the large capacity of active skeletal muscle to take up lactate, which is tightly correlated with lactate delivery. The limb lactate uptake during exercise is oxidized at rates far above resting oxygen consumption, implying that lactate uptake and subsequent oxidation are also dependent on an elevated metabolic rate. The relative contribution of whole body and limb lactate oxidation is between 20 and 30% of total carbohydrate oxidation at rest and during exercise under the various conditions. Skeletal muscle can change its limb net glucose uptake severalfold within minutes, causing a redistribution of the available glucose because whole body glucose turnover was unchanged.

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