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  • 1.
    Andersen Eikje, Cleng
    et al.
    Department of Sports, physical education and outdoor Studies, University college of Southeast Norway, Bø, Norway.
    Horgen, André
    Department of Sports, physical education and outdoor Studies, University college of Southeast Norway, Bø, Norway.
    Arnegård, Johan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    The organizing and regulation of mountain guiding in Scandinavia 1820–2016, with a glance at the Alps2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 4, SI, p. 555-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we study how mountain guiding was organized and regulated in Scandinavia and the Alps between 1820 and 2015 and focus on the most important di erences and similarities in Scandinavia, and between Scandinavia and the Alps. We conclude that Switzerland and Chamonix (France) represent two di erent systems in the Alps during the nineteenth century. However, through the emergence of national and international guide unions the regulation of mountain guiding in the Alps today appears uni ed, with a close connection between national regulation and mountain guide unions. In Scandinavia, Norway and Sweden historically had similar practices organizing and regulating mountain guiding, where a relatively strong layman tradition emerged during the 1960s and 1970s. In 2008, legal decisions led Sweden to change its system to match the Alp model, while Norway held on to the layman tradition. This leaves mountain guiding in Norway as a distinctly less regulated eld than in France, and Switzerland, as in and Sweden. 

  • 2.
    Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid
    et al.
    University College of Southeast Norway.
    Andersson, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control. Karolinska institutet.
    Best, James
    Jaeren Psychiatric Center, Norway.
    Høegmark, Simon
    Naturama Museum, Denmark.
    Roessler, Kirsten Kaya
    University of Southern Denmark.
    The use of physical activity, sport and outdoor life as tools of psychosocial intervention: the Nordic perspective2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 4, SI, p. 654-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The core values in the Nordic welfare model are health equality and social inclusion. Individuals with mental disorders and/or a history of substance use disorder are often excluded from the core value of equality. Psychosocial interventions such as physical activity and outdoor life can have several benefits for those suffering from mental disorders. Firstly, such interventions can have therapeutic effects. Secondly, they show benefits for somatic health and the risk of lifestyle-related diseases. Finally, they can provide an environment for experiencing self-efficacy, lead to improved quality of life, and promote the development and building of social relationships. This paper provides a critical review of current evidence for physical activity and outdoor life as psychosocial interventions in psychiatric and substance misuse treatment, with specific examples from Norway, Sweden and Denmark.

  • 3.
    Ferry, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Meckbach, Jane
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    School sport in Sweden: what is it, and how did it come to be?2013In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 805-818Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish sports model has traditionally meant that schools are responsible for all children's and young people's physical education, while the sports movement is responsible for the voluntary training and competition in sport. In recent years, this model seems to have changed since schools increasingly offers training in sports during the school day,school sport. This article describes the development of the Swedish school sport system in relation to major school reforms during the last three decades; reforms that have meant that the school system has been decentralized and market-adapted. This article also argues that sport under the period has gained a new meaning for schools. The main conclusions are that societal changes have enabled the sports movement an increased influence on school sport and that the Swedish sports model has changed. In particular, the ideological distinction between school physical education and voluntary competitive sport has been challenged.

  • 4.
    Lundvall, Suzanne
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Approaching a gender neutral PE-culture? An exploration of the phase of a divergent PE-culture: Gender in Physical Culture: Crossing Boundaries – Reconstituting Cultures2016In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 640-652Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore the phase of the divergent physical education (PE) culture in Sweden through the enactment of gender and how boundaries are formed and defended by symbolic mediating status and monopolization of resources. The study departures from a literature review with an inductive approach. Inspired by the method of critical incidents technique specific events have been studied to explore the longitudinal phase and the enactment of gender. Five critical incidents demonstrates how difference and similarity were created, maintained and contested, but also how the dismantling of gender differences came to be enacted and socially configured in space and time. The findings of the study point to a slow-but-still ongoing phase of dissolving symbolic and social boundaries. Going for a gender-neutral PE culture in the future seems to require our ability to both be gender sensitive and gender bend in order to transgress traditional gender order.

  • 5.
    Redelius, Karin
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Physical education in Scandinavia: an overview and some educational challenges.2010In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 13, p. 691-703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As in a number of other countries, the educational systems of Denmark, Norway and Sweden are experiencing expansion and change. These reforms have meant many changes and new challenges for the teachers, especially with reference to their work outside the classroom (or the gym). In Sweden, for example, teachers are expected to collaborate in order to give national syllabi a more concrete and local form, which in turn demands a common professional language. In this essay, our aim is to cast a pedagogic and somewhat didactic light on the subject by 1) giving a short and descriptive picture of some aspects of PE in Scandinavia's nine-year compulsory schools, with a main focus on Sweden, and by 2) identifying and discussing some of the educational challenges facing the subject today, also mainly from a Swedish perspective.

  • 6.
    Roe, Daniel
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Hugo, Martin
    Jönköping University.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    'Rings on the water': examining the pedagogical approach at a football program for detained youth in Sweden.2019In: Sport in Society: Cultures, Media, Politics, Commerce, ISSN 1743-0437, E-ISSN 1743-0445, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 919-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Studies indicate that sport within youth institutional settings can be beneficial (e.g. learning social skills) or problematic (e.g. social exclusion) depending on how they are structured, delivered and, ultimately, experienced by students. In this article, we examine the experiences of students and staff in an educational sport program at a Swedish all-male youth detention home (ages 16–20) in order to increase understanding of the pedagogical approach of a sports-based program for detained youth. Drawing on interviews with both students and staff, we identify and elaborate four aspects of the program—building a pedagogical platform, 'seeing' and meeting students, creating a supportive environment, and thinking beyond the institution—that were collectively represented to initiate and guide a process of growth and change for students. We discuss how these aspects of the program's pedagogical approach, in contrast to deficiency-based approaches, can provide a useful framework for delivering sport in ways that can benefit detained youth and other young people in socially vulnerable situations. ABSTRACT FROM AUTHOR

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