Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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  • 1.
    Andersson, Helena A
    et al.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Randers, Morten B
    Heiner-Møller, Anja
    Krustrup, Peter
    Mohr, Magni
    Elite female soccer players perform more high-intensity running when playing in international games compared with domestic league games.2010In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 912-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to compare movement pattern, fatigue development, and heart rate (HR) for top-class elite female players when playing international (INT) vs. domestic league games (DOM). Video-based time-motion analyses and HR recordings were performed on 17 players during INT and DOM. The distances covered in high-intensity running (HIR) and sprinting were longer (p < 0.05) in INT compared with DOM. More (p < 0.05) HIR was covered in INT than DOM during first and second half. Additionally, more (p < 0.05) sprinting occurred in INT compared with DOM in the first half. In both game types, the amount of HIR was reduced by 24-27% (p < 0.05) in the last 15-minute period compared with the first four 15-minute periods of the game. The midfielders covered longer (p < 0.05) distances with HIR in INT than in DOM over the entire game and in the most intense 5-minute period of the games, whereas no differences were observed between the game types for defenders. No difference in the HR response was found between INT and DOM. In conclusion, more HIR and sprinting occur in international compared with domestic games, which may affect the fatigue development for players in physically demanding roles. Thus, our results are important to coaches to prepare players to meet the challenges of international soccer games and show that the ability to perform intense intermittent exercise should be trained regularly in elite female players.

  • 2.
    Crommert, Martin Eriksson
    et al.
    Örebro University.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Tarassova, Olga
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Ekblom, Maria M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Abdominal Muscle Activation During Common Modifications of the Trunk Curl-Up Exercise.2021In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 428-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate effects of common modifications of trunk curl-up exercise on the involvement of the abdominal muscles, particularly the deepest muscle layer, transversus abdominis (TrA). Ten healthy females performed five different variations of the trunk curl-up at a standardized speed, varying the exercise by assuming three different arm positions and applying left and right twist. Indwelling fine-wire electromyography (EMG) electrodes were used to record from TrA, obliquus internus (OI), obliquus externus (OE) and rectus abdominis (RA) unilaterally on the right side. Increasing the load by changing the arm position during a straight trunk curl-up increased the EMG of all abdominal muscles. OI and TrA showed higher activation during right twist compared to left twist whereas OE displayed the opposite pattern. RA did not show any change in activation level between twisting directions. The apparent load dependency on the activation level of all muscles and the twisting direction dependency of all muscles except RA are in keeping with the fiber orientation of the muscles. Notably, also TrA, with a less obvious mechanical role with regards to fiber orientation, increased activation with load during the straight trunk curl-up. However, the highest activation level of TrA during the trunk curl-up was only 40 % of a maximum contraction, thus it might not be the most suitable strength training exercise for this muscle.

  • 3.
    Gago, Paulo
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Zoellner, Anja
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Cezar, Julio
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Ekblom, Maria M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Post Activation Potentiation and Concentric Contraction Performance: Effects on Rate of Torque Development, Neuromuscular Efficiency and Tensile Properties.2020In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1600-1608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how a 6s maximal voluntary isometric conditioning contration (MVIC) affected plantar flexor twitch rate of torque development (RTDTW), as well as peak torque (PTCC) and rate of torque development (RTDCC) of maximal voluntary concentric contractions (MVCC) performed at 60°/s. RTDCC and normalized triceps surae electromyography signals (EMGTS) were measured during different phases of contraction. Additionally, muscle tendon unit passive stiffness index (SI) calculated from the torque-angle relation was measured following each MVCC.Enhancements were found in the RTDTW immediately (by 59.7%) and up to 480s (by 6.0%) post MVIC (p<0.05). RTDCC during the 100-200ms, 50-200ms, and 0-200ms phases and PTCC were enhanced (by 5.7-9.5%) from 90-300s post conditioning (p<0.05). Neuromuscular efficiency increased (decreased EMGTS/RTDCC) in the 50-200ms and 0-200ms phases by 8.8-12.4%, from 90-480s post MVIC (p<0.05). No significant changes were found in the SI or in RTDCC during the 50-100ms phase, suggesting that the enhancements reported, reflect mainly contractile rather than neural or tensile mechanisms.PAP effects on PTCC and RTDCC were significant, and more durable at a lower velocity than previously reported. Enhancement in RTDCC and neuromuscular efficiency were found to be more prominent in later phases (>100ms) of the MVCC. This suggests that enhanced contractile properties, attained via MVIC, benefit concentric contraction performance.

  • 4. Gilenstam, Kajsa M
    et al.
    Thorsen, Kim
    Henriksson-Larsén, Karin B
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Physiological correlates of skating performance in women's and men's ice hockey.2011In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 2133-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the current investigation was to identify relationships between physiological off-ice tests and on-ice performance in female and male ice hockey players on a comparable competitive level. Eleven women, 24 ± 3.0 years, and 10 male ice hockey players, 23 ± 2.4 years, were tested for background variables: height, body weight (BW), ice hockey history, and lean body mass (LBM) and peak torque (PT) of the thigh muscles, VO2peak and aerobic performance (Onset of Blood Lactate Accumulation [OBLA], respiratory exchange ratio [RER1]) during an incremental bicycle ergometer test. Four different on-ice tests were used to measure ice skating performance. For women, skating time was positively correlated (p < 0.05) to BW and negatively correlated to LBM%, PT/BW, OBLA, RER 1, and VO2peak (ml O2·kg(-1) BW(-1)·min(-1)) in the Speed test. Acceleration test was positively correlated to BW and negatively correlated to OBLA and RER 1. For men, correlation analysis revealed only 1 significant correlation where skating time was positively correlated to VO2peak (L O2·min(-1)) in the Acceleration test. The male group had significantly higher physiological test values in all variables (absolute and relative to BW) but not in relation to LBM. Selected off-ice tests predict skating performance for women but not for men. The group of women was significantly smaller and had a lower physiological performance than the group of men and were slower in the on-ice performance tests. However, gender differences in off-ice variables were reduced or disappeared when values were related to LBM, indicating a similar capacity of producing strength and aerobic power in female and male hockey players. Skating performance in female hockey players may be improved by increasing thigh muscle strength, oxygen uptake, and relative muscle mass.

  • 5.
    Metaxas, Thomas
    et al.
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Mandroukas, Athanasios
    Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic.
    Michailidis, Yiannis
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Koutlianos, Nikolaos
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Christoulas, Kosmas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Correlation of Fiber-Type Composition and Sprint Performance in Youth Soccer Players.2019In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 2629-1634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine the correlation between muscle fiber type and sprint performance in elite young soccer players of different age groups of the same team. Twenty-eight young players participated in this study (group U15, n = 8; group U13, n = 9; and group U11, n = 11). Anthropometric assessments, acceleration (10 m), and Bangsbo modified sprint test (30 m) were performed. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis, and after that, fiber-type composition was determined by immunohistochemistry. No significant correlations were found between the sprint test and muscle fiber distribution for the groups U13 and U11 (p > 0.05). Also, no correlations were found between cross-sectional areas in the types of fibers with the sprint test in all groups (p > 0.05). A positive correlation was found between type I fibers and the performance in the acceleration test (10 m) (r = 0.77, p < 0.05) was found only in group U15 and a negative correlation between type IIA fibers and the performance in the acceleration test (10 m) (r = -0.89, p < 0.05). The correlations were observed only in group U15, which may indicate that the duration and the intensity of the soccer systematic training can affect the plasticity of the muscle fibers. Specific soccer training in youth is one of the factors that can affect fiber-type plasticity. The specific training programs and status of U15 are more intensive, and the exercises are oriented more to improve physical fitness.

  • 6. Mohr, Magni
    et al.
    Krustrup, Peter
    Andersson, Helena A
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Kirkendal, Donald
    Bangsbo, Jens
    Match activities of elite women soccer players at different performance levels.2008In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 341-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We sought to study the physical demands and match performance of women soccer players. Nineteen top-class and 15 high-level players were individually videotaped in competitive matches, and time-motion analysis were performed. The players changed locomotor activity >1,300 times in a game corresponding to every ~4 seconds and covered 9-11 km in total. The top-class players ran 28% longer (P < 0.05) at high intensities than high-level players (1.68 +/- 0.09 and 1.33 +/- 0.10 km, respectively) and sprinted 24% longer (P < 0.05). The top-class group had a decrease (P < 0.05) of 25-57% in high intensity running in the final 15 minutes compared with the first four 15-minutes intervals, whereas the high-level group performed less (P < 0.05) high-intensity running in the last 15 minutes of each half in comparison with the 2 previous 15-minute periods in the respective half. Peak distance covered by high intensity running in a 5-minute interval was 33% longer (P < 0.05) for the top-class players than the high-level players. In the following 5 minutes immediately after the peak interval top-class players covered 17% less (P < 0.05) high-intensity running than the game average. Defenders performed fewer (P < 0.05) intervals of high-intensity running than midfielders and attackers, as well as fewer (P < 0.05) sprints than the attackers. In conclusion, for women soccer players (1) top-class international players perform more intervals of high-intensity running than elite players at a lower level, (2) fatigue develops temporarily during and towards the end of a game, and (3) defenders have lower work rates than midfielders and attackers. The difference in high-intensity running between the 2 levels demonstrates the importance of intense intermittent exercise for match performance in women soccer. Thus, these aspects should be trained intensively in women soccer.

  • 7.
    Petré, Henrik
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Ovendal, Alexander
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Westblad, Niklas
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    ten Siethoff, Lasse
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Rosdahl, Hans
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Psilander, Niklas
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Effect of the Intrasession Exercise Order of Flywheel Resistance and High-Intensity Interval Training on Maximal Strength and Power Performance in Elite Team-Sport Athletes.2023In: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, ISSN 1064-8011, E-ISSN 1533-4287, Vol. 37, no 12, p. 2389-2396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of intrasession exercise order of maximal effort flywheel resistance training (RT; 436 repetitions [rep]) and high-intensity interval training (HIIT, 2–438 rep of 20 second at 130% of Watt atV̇O2max [wV̇O2max]), on the development of maximal strength and power in elite team-sport athletes. A 7-week training intervention involving 2 training sessions per week of either HIIT followed by RT (HIIT + RT, n 5 8), RT followed by HIIT (RT + HIIT, n 5 8), or RTalone (RT, n 5 7) was conducted in 23 elite male bandy players (24.7 6 4.3 years). Power and work were continuously measured during the flywheel RT. Isometric squat strength (ISq), countermovement jump, squat jump, and V̇O2max were measured before and after the training period. Power output during training differed between the groups (p 5 0.013, h2p5 0.365) with RT producing more power than HIIT + RT (p 5 0.005). ISq improved following RT + HIIT (;80%, d 5 2.10, p 5 0.001) and following HIIT + RT(;40%, d 5 1.64, p 5 0.005), and RT alone (;70%, d 5 1.67, p 5 0.004). V̇O2max increased following RT + HIIT and HIIT + RT(;10%, d51.98, p50.001 resp. d52.08, p50.001). HIIT before RT reduced power output during RT in elite team-sport athletes but did not lead to blunted development of maximal strength or power after a 7-week training period. During longer training periods(.7-weeks), it may be advantageous to schedule RT before HIIT because the negative effect of HIIT + RT on training quality increased during the final weeks of training. In addition, the largest training effect on maximal strength was observed following RT +HIIT.

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