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  • 1. Bentzen, Marte
    et al.
    Lemyre, Pierre
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Changes in Motivation and Burnout Indices in High-Performance Coaches Over The Course of a Competitive Season2016In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 28-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Being subject to a great range of demands is believed to increase burnout propensity in high-performance coaches. This study is the first to explore whether the 4-step self-determination theory process model is a valuable framework to better understand the process influencing burnout and well-being in high-performance coaches (N = 343, M = 40.33 years) throughout a competitive season. Findings indicated that coaches on average increased in burnout and decreased in well-being. Hypotheses were to a large extent supported: change in perceived environment → change in psychological need satisfaction → change in autonomous motivation → change in burnout and well-being.

  • 2.
    Moesch, Karin
    et al.
    Psykologiska institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Bäckström, Martin
    Psykologiska institutionen, Lunds universitet.
    Mattsson, C. Mikael
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Exploring Nonverbal Behaviors in Elite Handball: How and When do Players Celebrate?2015In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 94-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores nonverbal behaviors in the form of gestures and touch during elite handball matches. Based on a coding scheme, 616 postshot periods following a goal, stemming from 18 matches, were analyzed. Results revealed that, on average, 2.77 nonverbal behaviors were displayed after scoring. Play-off matches resulted in a higher average of nonverbal behaviors than league matches. The more a team was leading by, the higher the overall number of nonverbal behaviors; meanwhile, the overall amount of nonverbal behaviors declined over the course of a match. The results pinpoint to the situation specificity of nonverbal behaviors during ongoing matches.

  • 3.
    Nordin, Sanna M
    et al.
    London Sport Institute.
    Cumming, Jennifer
    School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham .
    Exploring common ground: Comparing the imagery of dancers and aesthetic sport performers2008In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Nordin, Sanna M
    et al.
    London Sport Institute.
    Cumming, Jennifer
    School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Birmingham.
    Vincent, J
    McGrory, S
    Mental Practice or spontaneous play?: Examining which types of imagery constitute deliberate practice in sport2006In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, Vol. 18, p. 345-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Imagery use was examined within the deliberate practice framework (Ericsson, Krampe, & Tesch-Römer, 1993). Athletes (N = 150) from three competitive levels (recreational, intermediate, and elite) completed an adapted version of the Sport Imagery Questionnaire (SIQ; Hall, Mack, Paivio, & Hausenblas, 1998). Each SIQ item was scored for frequency, deliberation, relevance, concentration, and enjoyment. Eight SIQ items were deemed to be deliberate practice: five cognitive-specific images, two cognitive-general images, and one motivational general-mastery image. Motivational-specific imagery instead resembled deliberate play (Côté, Baker, & Abernethy, 2003). Elite and intermediate athletes used imagery more frequently and deliberately and perceived imagery to be more relevant and requiring more concentration than recreational athletes. Differences also existed regarding how deliberately the athletes engaged in various imagery types. The findings may inform applied practitioners regarding differences in imagery use between competitive levels and differences in the characteristics of imagery types.

  • 5.
    Van Slingerland, Krista J.
    et al.
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Durand-Bush, Natalie
    University of Ottawa, Canada.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Collaboratively designing the Canadian Centre for Mental Health and Sport (CCMHS) using Group Concept Mapping2019In: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, ISSN 1041-3200, E-ISSN 1533-1571, p. 1-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are special considerations and challenges involved in diagnosing and treating mental illnesses in athletes (Glick & Horsfall, 2009). However, very few clinical psychologists and psychiatrists in Canada specialize in sport, representing a significant gap in mental health care service provision for this population. In this study, a group of expert sport and mental health stakeholders (n?=?17) employed a Participatory Action Research approach to design a specialized sport-focused mental health care model integrated within the Canadian Centre for Mental Health in Sport (CCMHS). Stakeholders engaged in focus group discussions to perform an environmental scan of the Canadian sport and mental health care contexts that laid the foundation for a group concept mapping (GCM) exercise. Using the Concepts Systems software, stakeholders individually produced statements that described the elements to include in a sport-specific mental health care model implemented within the CCMHS. A total of 106 unique statements were organized into 6 themed clusters, focusing on: (1) service delivery [40 statements], (2) communications and promotion [20 statements], (3) business, policy, and operations [19 statements], (4) partnerships [9 statements], (5) research [6 statements], and (6) education and training [6 statements]. These findings were operationalized to establish a sport-centered mental health care model and the CCMHS itself - the first Centre of its kind in Canada. GCM is seldom used to conduct sport research, thus the validity and reliability of this methodology was assessed.Lay Summary: In this study, 17 sport and mental health expert stakeholders participated in group concept mapping to design a sport-focused mental health care delivery model. The group produced 106 unique statements that were organized into six strategic priority areas and operationalized to establish the Canadian Centre for Mental Health and Sport.

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