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  • 1. Aujla, Imogen Jane
    et al.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Redding, Emma
    A qualitative investigation of commitment to dance: findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training.2014In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 138-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commitment to an activity forms an essential part of the talent development process, yet little is known about the reasons why young people commit to dance training. The aim of this study was to investigate the factors that affect young dancers’ commitment to a selective dance talent scheme. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 committed dancers and transcripts were content analysed. Enjoyment was the most important factor relating to commitment, and stemmed from several sources such as self-expression, movement sensations and feelings associated with performing. Relationships with dance peers and teachers, parental support and the opportunities available on the scheme also enhanced commitment. While some potential barriers to participation were identified, such as concerns about injury, these seemed insufficient to affect the participants’ commitment. The results of the study may help educators to develop young dancers’ talents optimally by enhancing their commitment to training. [ABSTRACT FROM PUBLISHER]

  • 2.
    Golding, Alison
    et al.
    Department of Dance Science, Trinity Laban, London, UK.
    Boes, Claudia
    School of Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Investigating learning through developmental dance movement as a kinaesthetic tool in the Early Years Foundation Stage2016In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 235-267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The understanding of the significance of movement to learning benefits from advances in neuroscience. This study considered a neurophysiological perspective in relation to the educational theory of Accelerated Learning (AL) for which little empirical evidence exists. Childhood development themes and learning strategies from a neurophysical-psychological viewpoint were investigated through the use of developmental dance movement (DDM) as a kinaesthetic tool over an eight-session programme with three early years practitioners and two reception classes in two UK primary schools. The research strategy included both qualitative and quantitative methods to capture examples of accelerated learning and transfer. Qualitative data from three semi-structured interviews with early years practitioners was based on their observations of intervention sessions on a whole-group level and selected case studies of children in their class. The data were analysed with the aim of addressing their views on the children’s learning, which influenced and elucidated the practitioners own learning outcomes. Quantitative methods utilised the Goodenough–Harris draw-a-person test with participating children to explore change in visual-motor integration and developmental maturity as a measure of accelerated learning and transfer. Findings supported neuroscientific research and highlighted useful and contradictory aspects of AL theory. Practitioners were able to identify benefits for pupils with specific learning needs. Case studies demonstrated accelerated learning through observed changed behaviour. T-test results from Aston index pre-post scored drawings showed significant differences (p = 0.005) in visual-motor integration and developmental maturity. It is concluded that DDM can provide opportunity for physical/cognitive advancement for young children.

  • 3.
    Klockare, Ellinor
    et al.
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Gustafsson, Henrik
    Karlstads Universitet.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance .
    An interpretative phenomenological analysis of how professional dance teachers implement psychological skills training in practice2011In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 277-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine how dance teachers work with psychological skills with their students in class. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six female professional teachers in jazz, ballet and contemporary dance. The interview transcripts were analyzed using interpretative phenomenological analysis (Smith 1996

    38.           Smith ,  J.A.    1996 .  Beyond the divide between cognition and discourse: usinginterpretative phenomenological analysis in health psychology .   Psychology and Health  ,  11 :  261 – 271 .   [Taylor & Francis Online], [Web of Science ®]View all references). Results revealed that all teachers used psychological skills training techniques such as goal setting and imagery and worked toward the following outcomes: group cohesion, self-confidence, and anxiety management. They strove to create a task-involving climate in their classes and the students were encouraged to participate in, for instance, the goal setting process and imagery applications. The teachers also placed significant emphasis on performance preparation, evaluation, and feedback, although some found it difficult to give positive feedback. Many of the findings can be associated with contemporary theories in sport psychology. However, the dance teachers had almost no formal training in performance psychology, but had instead developed their teaching methodology through their own experiences. Further skills development and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  • 4.
    Nordin, Sanna M
    London Sport Institute .
    Review of Nancy Upper’s book Ballet Dancers in Career Transition 2008In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 103-106Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Sanchez, Erin N
    et al.
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.
    Aujla, Imogen J
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Cultural background variables in dance talent development: Findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training2013In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 14, no 3, p. 260-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is a qualitative enquiry into cultural background variables – social support, values, race/ethnicity and economic means – in the process of dance talent development. Seven urban dance students in pre-vocational training, aged 15–19, participated in semi-structured interviews. Interviews were inductively analysed using QSR International NVivo 7.0. Further deductive analysis revealed that the findings were in line with the Differentiated Model of Giftedness and Talent. Results indicated that social environments positively influenced dance students’ feelings of psychological well-being, self-esteem and motivation, which in turn supported the transformation of aptitude into dance talent. Social benefits, such as building close friendships, facilitated learning and encouraged persistence during more difficult periods of dance training. Economic support was an essential aid to talent development, providing training and performance opportunities, transport and physiotherapy. The study offers a preliminary indication that economic limitations may not only prohibit dance training but may also be related to lower perceptions of social support both in the home and in dance environments. Cultural values espoused in dancers’ homes encouraged the value of hard work and raised questions about the economic suitability of a career in dance. Overall, cultural background variables appear to have a major effect on dance talent development.

  • 6.
    Walker, Imogen J
    et al.
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance .
    Talent identification and development in dance: A review of the literature2010In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 165-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Talent identification and development processes are important components of many dance programmes, yet talent is notoriously difficult to define and its identification may rely on intuitive judgements. Taking a systematic approach to the study of dance talent could enable researchers and educators to better determine what talent actually is, the multi‐faceted components that exist within talent and subsequently how best it can be optimised. The aim of this paper is to review existing literature relating to aspects of dance talent. While not attempting to define talent nor provide a guide for identification, the review reports on existing relevant literature that describes the characteristics associated with talent in the hope that it will be valuable to educators and researchers. Further research into the characteristics of talented dancers may enable teachers to prepare their students optimally for the exciting opportunities that dance can offer.

  • 7.
    Watson, Debbie
    et al.
    Trinity Laban Conservatoire of Music and Dance.
    Nordin-Bates, Sanna M
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Chappell, Kerry
    University of Exeter.
    Facilitating and nurturing creativity in pre-vocational dancers: Findings from the UK Centres for Advanced Training2012In: Research in Dance Education, ISSN 1464-7893, E-ISSN 1470-1111, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 153-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a case study investigation into creativity involving young dancers and faculty members on the UK government-funded pre-vocational contemporary dance training programme. Qualitative research techniques were used to gather and interpret data on how individuals nurtured and viewed creativity at an individual level, as well as how the facilitation of creativity was perceived and manifested at a teaching and institutional level. Findings suggest that nurturing creativity at a within-person level involves the evolution and development of personality characteristics and abilities in both direct and indirect ways. Two other factors were influential at this level, namely inspiration and motivation. At an interpersonal and environmental level, the study found that a communal and collaborative approach underpinned the nurture of creativity in the setting. Additionally, teaching styles which supported the development of dancers’ own voice alongside dance skills were critical in helping to encourage and realise creativity in young people. The study sheds light on the constantly evolving and dynamic processes involved when nurturing and facilitating creativity.

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