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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet.
    Blom, Victoria
    Stockholms universitet.
    Work conditions for workers with good long-term health2010In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 3, p. 160-172Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Bodin, Lennart
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Svedberg, Pia
    Applying the demand-control-support model on burnout in managers and non-managers.2016In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 110-122Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to study the demand-control-support (DCS) model on burnout in male and female managers and non-managers, taking into account genetic and shared family environmental factors, contributing to the understanding of mechanisms of how and when work stress is related to burnout. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 5,510 individuals in complete same-sex twin pairs from the Swedish Twin Registry were included in the analyses. Co-twin control analyses were performed using linear mixed modeling, comparing between-pairs and within-pair effects, stratified by zygosity and sex. Findings – Managers scored higher on demands and control in their work than non-managers, and female managers seem to be particularly at risk for burnout facing more demands which are not reduced by a higher control as in their male counterparts. Co-twin analyses showed that associations between control and burnout as well as between demands and burnout seem to be affected by shared family environmental factors in male non-managers but not in male managers in which instead the associations between social support and burnout seem to be influenced by shared family environment. Practical implications – Taken together, the study offers knowledge that shared environment as well as sex and managerial status are important factors to consider in how DCS is associated to exhaustion. Originality/value – Using twin data with possibilities to control for genetics, shared environment, sex and age, this study offers unique insight into the DCS research, which focusses primarily on the workplace environment rather than individual factors.

  • 3.
    Blom, Victoria
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group. Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svedberg, Pia
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Bergstrom, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Div Intervent & Implementat Res, Inst Environm Med, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Mather, Lisa
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Lindfors, Petra
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Psychol, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Stress in paid and unpaid work as related to cortisol and subjective health complaints in women working in the public health care sector2017In: International Journal of Workplace Health Management, ISSN 1753-8351, E-ISSN 1753-836X, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 286-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose - Focusing on 420 women employed within the woman-dominated health care sector, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how any variation in their total workload (TWL) in terms of paid and unpaid work relate to various subjective health complaints (SHC) (n = 420) and the neuroendocrine stress marker cortisol (n = 68). Design/methodology/approach - The authors explored how any variation in their TWL in terms of paid and unpaid work related cross-sectionally to SHC (n = 420), and the neuroendocrine stress marker cortisol (n = 68). Findings - Hierarchical regression analyses showed that stress of unpaid work was most strongly related to diurnal variations in cortisol. Both stress of paid and unpaid work as well as TWL stress, but not hours spent on TWL, were related to SHC. Practical implications - Taken together, objective measures of hours spent on various TWL domains were unrelated to outcome measures while perceptions of having too much TWL and TWL stress were linked to both cortisol and SHC, i.e. how individuals perceive a situation seem to be more important for health than the actual situation, which has implications for research and efforts to reduce individual TWL. Originality/value - This study is unique in showing that unpaid work and perceptions having too much TWL relate to stress markers in women working in the public health care sector.

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