Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Norra Stn Gatan 69,7 Tr, S-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Norra Stn Gatan 69,7 Tr, S-11364 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Birgegard, Andreas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Norra Stn Gatan 69,7 Tr, S-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Norra Stn Gatan 69,7 Tr, S-11364 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Clinton, David
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Norra Stn Gatan 69,7 Tr, S-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Norra Stn Gatan 69,7 Tr, S-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.;Inst Eating Disorders, Kruses Gata 8, N-0263 Oslo, Norway..
    Factor analysis of the adolescent version of the Eating Disorders Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q): results from Swedish general population and clinical samples2017In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 5, article id 19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) is perhaps the single most widely used self-report measure of eating disorder (ED) symptoms, important questions remain about its validity and applicability in relation to particular groups of individuals, especially adolescents of both genders. Methods: The present study investigated the factor structure of the adolescent version of the Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire (EDE-Q) in samples of Swedish girls and boys from the general population and girls with a diagnosed eating disorder. Girls (N = 239) and boys (N = 248) aged between 13 and 15 years who were attending school, and girls (N = 570) aged between 12 and 14 years who were in treatment for an eating disorder at a specialist eating disorder clinic were assessed on the adolescent version of the EDE-Q. Results: The adolescent version of the EDE-Q demonstrated satisfactory levels of internal consistency. However, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) failed to support the four-factor model of the EDE-Q. Parallel analysis (PA) and subsequent exploratory factor analysis (EFA) suggested that the adolescent version of the EDE-Q comprises one underlying factor in young adolescent girls (both clinical and general population), centred on Dissatisfaction with Shape and Weight. In boys three factors were found: Weight-related Concerns, Body Discomfort and Restraint. Conclusions: The EDE-Q appears to measure different underlying aspects of eating disorder psychopathology in young teenagers compared to adults. The dimensions underlying disordered eating in young girls may become increasingly differentiated with time. There appear to be important gender-based differences in the dimensions underlying the EDE-Q in young teenagers. Therapists should be alert to beliefs that girls have about the importance of shape and weight, while in boys it may be more important to be attentive to how they feel about their bodies in relation to weight.

  • 2. Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    et al.
    Birgegård, Andreas
    The enemy within: the association between self-image and eating disorder symptoms in healthy, non help-seeking and clinical young women2015In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 3, article id 30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previous research has shown self-image according to the interpersonal Structural Analysis of SocialBehavior model, to relate to and predict eating disorder symptoms and outcomes.

    Methods: We examined associations between self-reported self-image and ED symptoms in three groups of 16–25year old females: healthy (N = 388), non help-seeking (N = 227) and clinical (N = 6384). Analyses were divided intoage groups of 16–18 and 19–25 years, and the patient sample was divided into diagnostic groups.

    Results: Stepwise regressions with self-image aspects as independent variables and eating disorder symptoms asdependent showed that low self-love/acceptance and high self-blame were associated with more eating disordersymptoms in all groups, except older patients with bulimia nervosa where self-hate also contributed. Associationswere generally weaker in the healthy groups and the older samples.

    Conclusions: We put forward that older age, low desirability of symptoms, poorly working symptoms, and beingacknowledged as ill, may weaken the association, with implications for treatment and prevention.

  • 3.
    Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Norra Stn Gatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Norra Stn Gatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Norring, Claes
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Norra Stn Gatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Norra Stn Gatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Birgegard, Andreas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Norra Stn Gatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Ctr Psychiat Res, Norra Stn Gatan 69, SE-11364 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Self-image and 12-month outcome in females with eating disorders: extending previous findings2019In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 7, article id 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundThe interpersonal Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) model of self-image has repeatedly proven valuable in relation to eating disorder (ED) symptoms and in predicting ED outcome.ObjectiveWe studied the association between initial self-image according to the SASB and 12-month outcome, in five diagnostic groups of female ED patients. Based on previous findings, we expected autonomy related variables (self-control/autonomy) would strongly predict outcome in anorexia nervosa (AN) groups, whereas variables related to affiliation (self-attack/love) would moderately predict outcome in bulimia nervosa (BN).MethodParticipants were adult female patients, of whom 457 had AN restrictive type, 228 AN binge/purge subtype, 861 BN, 505 other specified ED and 170 binge eating disorder. Data came from the Stepwise clinical database in Sweden. Outcomes were presence/absence of ED diagnosis and self-rated ED symptoms, and we controlled for baseline ED pathology, BMI, age and general psychiatric symptoms.ResultsRegression analyses showed that although the pattern differed somewhat between diagnostic groups, high initial self-love and low self-attack/self-blame predicted a more positive 12-month outcome. In some groups (AN/R in particular), these variables remained important even when baseline pathology and age were included in the analyses.DiscussionSelf-image aspects once again display substantial power in predicting outcome in EDs. In AN/R patients, self-love plays an almost as crucial a role as baseline ED pathology in relation to 12-month outcome.

  • 4. Monell, Elin
    et al.
    Högdahl, Louise
    Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    Birgegård, Andreas
    Emotion dysregulation, self-image and eating disorder symptoms in University Women2015In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 3, no 1, article id 44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We studied associations between emotion dysregulation, self-image and eating disorder (ED)symptoms in university women, and contrasted two indirect effect models to examine possible interveningmechanisms to produce ED symptoms.

    Methods: 252 female Swedish university students completed the Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale(DERS), the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB) self-image measure, and the Eating DisorderExamination Questionnaire (EDE-Q). Correlations between scales were followed by five simple mediationanalysis pairs with two possible pathways using five ED symptom variables as outcome. The models positedeither self-image or emotion dysregulation as mediator or independent variable, respectively. ED symptomswere EDE-Q Global score, objective binge eating episodes (OBE), subjective binge eating episodes (SBE), andtwo variants of EDE-Q excessive exercise.

    Results: Emotion dysregulation and self-image were strongly correlated, and both correlated moderately withEDE-Q Global score. There were distinct indirect effects through self-image on the relationship between emotiondysregulation and ED symptoms, but not vice versa. These indirect effects were evident in relation to cognitive EDsymptoms and both OBE and SBE, but not in relation to excessive exercise.

    Conclusions: Results suggest that even if closely related, emotion dysregulation and self-image both contributeunique knowledge in relation to ED symptoms. Self-image as an intervening mechanism between emotiondysregulation and ED symptoms is relevant for models of the development, maintenance and treatment of ED, as wellas treatment focus.

  • 5.
    Monell, Elin
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Levallius, Johanna
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Birgegard, Andreas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Stockholm Cty Council, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Running on empty - a nationwide large-scale examination of compulsive exercise in eating disorders2018In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 6, article id 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Compulsive exercise (CE) has been the neglected "Cinderella" among eating disorder (ED) symptoms, even though it seems to impact severity, treatment and outcome. This prompted a large-scale and systematic examination of the impact of CE in a representative ED sample. Methods: CE was examined in over 9000 female and male patients from a clinical ED database (covering out-patient, day and/or residential treatment) with respect to prevalence, ED diagnosis, ED symptoms, clinical features, patient characteristics, and outcome at 1-year follow-up. Relationships between changes in CE behavior and remission were also examined. Results: CE was a transdiagnostic symptom, present in nearly half of all patients (48%). It was associated with greater overall ED pathology, particularly dietary restraint, and negative perfectionism. Initial CE did not impact remission rate, but patients continuing or starting CE during treatment had considerably lower remission rates compared to patients who never engaged in, or ceased with, CE. Results were comparable for females and males. Conclusions: At baseline, there were few differences between patients with and without CE, except a somewhat higher symptom load for patients with CE, and CE did not predict ED outcome. However, how CE developed during treatment to 1-year follow-up considerably impacted remission rates. We strongly recommend CE to be systematically assessed, addressed, and continuously evaluated in all ED patients seeking treatment.

  • 6.
    Petersson, Suzanne
    et al.
    Kalmar Reg Council, Dept Rehabil, Hus 13,Plan 7, S-39185 Lanssjukhuset, Kalmar, Sweden.;Linnaeus Univ, Dept Med & Optometry, Kalmar, Sweden..
    Birgegard, Andreas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Brudin, Lars
    Region Kalmar Cty, Dept Clin Physiol, Kalmar, Sweden.;Linkoping Univ, Dept Med & Hlth Sci, Linkoping, Sweden..
    Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Stockholm Hlth Care Serv, Ctr Psychiat Res, Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Clin Neurosci, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Monell, Elin
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Clinton, David
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat, Stockholm, Sweden.;Inst Eating Disorders, Oslo, Norway..
    Bjorck, Caroline
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Neurobiol Care Sci & Soc NVS, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Initial self-blame predicts eating disorder remission after 9 years2021In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 9, no 1, article id 81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Research into predictors of outcome in eating disorders (ED) has shown conflicting results, with few studies of long-term predictors and the possible importance of psychological variables that may act as risk- and maintenance factors. Aim To identify baseline predictors of ED remission nine years after initial clinical assessment using self-report measures of ED psychopathology, psychiatric symptoms, and self-image in a sample of adult ED patients (N = 104) treated at specialist units in Stockholm, Sweden. Sixty patients participated in the follow-up, of whom 41 patients (68%) had achieved remission. Results Results suggested that the only significant predictor of diagnostic remission after nine years was initial levels of self-blame. Conclusion In order to ensure long-term recovery in ED it may be important for clinicians to widen their therapeutic repertoire and utilise techniques that reduce self-blame and increase self-compassion. Plain English summary It is difficult to predict how an eating disorder will develop, and research has found varying factors that affect the outcome of the condition. Recovery rates vary from nearly nil to over 90%. This variation could be explained by different research factors, but are more likely due to varying definitions of 'recovery', with less stringent definitions yielding high recovery rates and more stringent definitions yielding lower rates. The present study investigated whether the severity of eating disorder symptoms and other psychiatric symptoms could predict recovery nine years from first admission to specialised eating disorder care. Sixty patients at three eating disorder treatment units participated, and their scores on self-report measures of symptoms were used as predictor variables. Forty-one participants had no eating disorder diagnosis at nine-year follow-up. Most participants with binge-eating disorder had recovered, while the poorest outcome was found for anorexia nervosa with slightly over half of patients recovered after nine years. The only predictor for the nine-year outcome was a higher initial rating of self-blame, measured with the Structural Analysis of the Social Behavior. It was concluded that it may be important for clinicians to detect and address self-blame early in the treatment of eating disorders in order to enhance the possibility of recovery. Treatment should focus on reducing self-blame and increasing self-acceptance.

  • 7.
    Selenius, Sofia
    et al.
    Natl Eating Disorders Patient & Advocacy Org, Frisk & Fri Riksforeningen Mot Atstorningar, Inedalsgatan 5, S-11233 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Birgegard, Andreas
    Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat MEB, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Forsén Mantilla, Emma
    Natl Eating Disorders Patient & Advocacy Org, Frisk & Fri Riksforeningen Mot Atstorningar, Inedalsgatan 5, S-11233 Stockholm, Sweden.;Karolinska Inst, Dept Med Epidemiol & Biostat MEB, Nobels Vag 12A, S-17177 Stockholm, Sweden..
    Preliminary evaluation of the online course "I Care" targeting eating disorder knowledge and attitudes among sports coaches and fitness instructors2022In: Journal of Eating Disorders, E-ISSN 2050-2974, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plain English summary Fitness instructors, coaches and trainers are often looked up to within their sporting community. They are also likely to meet individuals at risk for developing eating disorders, since excessive or compulsive exercise is a common symptom of these disorders. Coaches therefore need to know more about how to promote healthy ideals and how to detect and approach individuals at risk of developing an eating disorder. We studied if a brief online education called I Care could improve personal compulsive exercise tendencies, knowledge about eating disorders, and readiness to approach individuals seemingly at risk, in 150 coaches, trainers, and fitness instructors. We found that coaches felt more confident and knowledgeable about warning signs and how to approach a person at risk after completing I Care. They also showed increased insight about EDs not being recognizable just by looking at a person and their attitudes about their own exercise behavior changed in a positive way. Although the lack of a comparison group makes conclusions tentative, I Care may have positive effects in terms of a "declaration of intent" toward more positive role-modeling and interactions with clients. Background Fitness instructors, coaches and trainers are often looked up to and seen as role-models within their sporting community. Since problematic exercise is a common symptom of eating disorders, they are also highly likely to meet individuals at risk for developing eating disorders within their profession. Thus, educating coaches about how to promote healthy ideals within their sports/training context and equipping them with knowledge to be able to detect and approach individuals at risk, is of great importance. Method We studied the pre-to-post effects of the I Care online psychoeducational intervention in 150 coaches, trainers, and fitness instructors. Variables included the Compulsive Exercise Test, as well as knowledge of eating disorders, and confidence and awareness regarding approaching, talking to, and referring individuals whose observed behavior raised concerns. Results Results showed significant and large improvements in coaches' confidence and knowledge regarding warning signs and how to approach an at-risk person, and a decrease in their perceived ability to recognize eating disorders by sight, e.g., insight about EDs not being recognizable just by looking at a person. Also, significant positive change in attitudes about their own rule-driven exercise behavior and lack of enjoyment of exercise was observed. Conclusions Although the lack of a control group compels caution, the study suggests that I Care may have positive effects in terms of a "declaration of intent" toward more positive role-modeling and interactions with clients.

1 - 7 of 7
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf