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  • 1.
    Apró, William
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Moberg, Marcus
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Hamilton, D Lee
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Rooyackers, Olav
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Leucine does not affect mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 assembly but is required for maximal ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 activity in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.2015In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 4358-4373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examined how the stimulatory effect of leucine on the mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway is affected by the presence of the remaining essential amino acids. Nine male subjects performed resistance exercise on 4 occasions and were randomly supplied essential amino acids (EAAs) with or without leucine (EAA-Leu), leucine alone, or flavored water (placebo; control). Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis before and 60 and 90 min after exercise. Biopsies were analyzed for protein phosphorylation, kinase activity, protein-protein interactions, amino acid concentrations, and tracer incorporation. Leucine alone stimulated ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 (S6K1) phosphorylation ∼280% more than placebo and EAA-Leu after exercise. Moreover, this response was enhanced by 60-75% after intake of EAAs compared with that of leucine alone (P < 0.05). Kinase activity of S6K1 reflected that of S6K1 phosphorylation; 60 min after exercise, the activity was elevated 3.3- and 4.2-fold with intake of leucine alone and with EAAs, respectively (P < 0.05). The interaction between mammalian target of rapamycin and regulatory-associated protein of mammalian target of rapamycin was unaltered in response to both resistance exercise and amino acid provision. Leucine alone stimulates mTORC1 signaling, although this response is enhanced by other EAA and does not appear to be caused by alterations in mTORC1 assembly.-Apró, W., Moberg, M., Hamilton, D. L., Ekblom, B., Rooyackers, O., Holmberg, H.-C., Blomstrand, E. Leucine does not affect mechanistic target of rapamycin complex 1 assembly but is required for maximal ribosomal protein s6 kinase 1 activity in human skeletal muscle following resistance exercise.

  • 2.
    Larsen, Filip
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Mitochondrial oxygen affinity predicts basal metabolic rate in humans2011In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 25, no 8, p. 2843-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The basal metabolic rate (BMR) is referred to as the minimal rate of metabolism required to support basic body functions. It is well known that individual BMR varies greatly, even when correcting for body weight, fat content, and thyroid hormone levels, but the mechanistic determinants of this phenomenon remain unknown. Here, we show in humans that mass-related BMR correlates strongly to the mitochondrial oxygen affinity (p50(mito); R(2)=0.66, P=0.0004) measured in isolated skeletal muscle mitochondria. A similar relationship was found for oxygen affinity and efficiency during constant-load submaximal exercise (R(2)=0.46, P=0.007). In contrast, BMR did not correlate to overall mitochondrial density or to proton leak. Mechanistically, part of the p50(mito) seems to be controlled by the excess of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) protein and activity relative to other mitochondrial proteins. This is illustrated by the 5-fold increase in p50(mito) after partial cyanide inhibition of COX at doses that do not affect maximal mitochondrial electron flux through the ETS. These data suggest that the interindividual variation in BMR in humans is primarily explained by differences in mitochondrial oxygen affinity. The implications of these findings are discussed in terms of a trade-off between aerobic efficiency and power.

  • 3.
    Larsen, Filip J
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Schiffer, Tomas A
    Ørtenblad, Niels
    Zinner, Christoph
    Morales-Alamo, David
    Willis, Sarah J
    Calbet, Jose A
    Holmberg, Hans-Christer
    Boushel, Robert
    High-intensity sprint training inhibits mitochondrial respiration through aconitase inactivation.2016In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 417-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intense exercise training is a powerful stimulus that activates mitochondrial biogenesis pathways and thus increases mitochondrial density and oxidative capacity. Moderate levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) during exercise are considered vital in the adaptive response, but high ROS production is a serious threat to cellular homeostasis. Although biochemical markers of the transition from adaptive to maladaptive ROS stress are lacking, it is likely mediated by redox sensitive enzymes involved in oxidative metabolism. One potential enzyme mediating such redox sensitivity is the citric acid cycle enzyme aconitase. In this study, we examined biopsy specimens of vastus lateralis and triceps brachii in healthy volunteers, together with primary human myotubes. An intense exercise regimen inactivated aconitase by 55-72%, resulting in inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by 50-65%. In the vastus, the mitochondrial dysfunction was compensated for by a 15-72% increase in mitochondrial proteins, whereas H2O2 emission was unchanged. In parallel with the inactivation of aconitase, the intermediary metabolite citrate accumulated and played an integral part in cellular protection against oxidative stress. In contrast, the triceps failed to increase mitochondrial density, and citrate did not accumulate. Instead, mitochondrial H2O2 emission was decreased to 40% of the pretraining levels, together with a 6-fold increase in protein abundance of catalase. In this study, a novel mitochondrial stress response was highlighted where accumulation of citrate acted to preserve the redox status of the cell during periods of intense exercise.-Larsen, F. J., Schiffer, T. A., Ørtenblad, N., Zinner, C., Morales-Alamo, D., Willis, S. J., Calbet, J. A., Holmberg, H.-C., Boushel, R. High-intensity sprint training inhibits mitochondrial respiration through aconitase inactivation.

  • 4.
    Mijwel, Sara
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Cardinale, Daniele A.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Norrbom, Jessica
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Chapman, Mark
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ivarsson, Niklas
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Wengström, Yvonne
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sundberg, Carl Johan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rundqvist, Helene
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Exercise training during chemotherapy preserves skeletal muscle fiber area, capillarization, and mitochondrial content in patients with breast cancer.2018In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 5495-5505, article id fj201700968RArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exercise has been suggested to ameliorate the detrimental effects of chemotherapy on skeletal muscle. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different exercise regimens with usual care on skeletal muscle morphology and mitochondrial markers in patients being treated with chemotherapy for breast cancer. Specifically, we compared moderate-intensity aerobic training combined with high-intensity interval training (AT-HIIT) and resistance training combined with high-intensity interval training (RT-HIIT) with usual care (UC). Resting skeletal muscle biopsies were obtained pre- and postintervention from 23 randomly selected women from the OptiTrain breast cancer trial who underwent RT-HIIT, AT-HIIT, or UC for 16 wk. Over the intervention, citrate synthase activity, muscle fiber cross-sectional area, capillaries per fiber, and myosin heavy chain isoform type I were reduced in UC, whereas RT-HIIT and AT-HIIT were able to counteract these declines. AT-HIIT promoted up-regulation of the electron transport chain protein levels vs. UC. RT-HIIT favored satellite cell count vs. UC and AT-HIIT. There was a significant association between change in citrate synthase activity and self-reported fatigue. AT-HIIT and RT-HIIT maintained or improved markers of skeletal muscle function compared with the declines found in the UC group, indicating a sustained trainability in addition to the preservation of skeletal muscle structural and metabolic characteristics during chemotherapy. These findings highlight the importance of supervised exercise programs for patients with breast cancer during chemotherapy.-Mijwel, S., Cardinale, D. A., Norrbom, J., Chapman, M., Ivarsson, N., Wengström, Y., Sundberg, C. J., Rundqvist, H. Exercise training during chemotherapy preserves skeletal muscle fiber area, capillarization, and mitochondrial content in patients with breast cancer.

  • 5. Schiffer, Tomas A
    et al.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.
    Lundberg, Jon O
    Weitzberg, Eddie
    Larsen, Filip J
    Dynamic regulation of metabolic efficiency explains tolerance to acute hypoxia in humans.2014In: The FASEB Journal, ISSN 0892-6638, E-ISSN 1530-6860, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 4303-11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The maximum power principle dictates that open biological systems tend to self-organize to a level of efficiency that allows maximal power production. Applying this principle to cellular energetics and whole-body physiology would suggest that for every metabolic challenge, an optimal efficiency exists that maximizes power production. On exposure to hypoxia, it would be favorable if metabolic efficiency would rapidly adjust so as to better preserve work performance. We tested this idea in humans by measuring metabolic efficiency and exercise tolerance under normoxic (Fio2=20.9%) and hypoxic (Fio2=16%) conditions, where Fio2 is fraction of inhaled oxygen. The results were compared with respirometric analyses of skeletal muscle mitochondria from the same individuals. We found that among healthy trained subjects (n=14) with a wide range of metabolic efficiency (ME), those with a high ME during normoxic exercise were able to better maintain exercise capacity (Wmax) in hypoxia. On hypoxic exposure, these subjects acutely decreased their efficiency from 19.2 to 17.4%, thereby likely shifting it closer to a degree of efficiency where maximal power production is achieved. In addition, mitochondria from these subjects had a lower intrinsic respiration compared to subjects that showed a large drop in Wmax in hypoxia An acute shift in efficiency was also demonstrated in isolated mitochondria exposed to physiological levels of hypoxia as P/O ratio increased from 0.9 to 1.3 with hypoxic exposure. These findings suggest the existence of a physiological adaptive response by which metabolic efficiency is dynamically optimized to maximize power production.-Schiffer, T. A., Ekblom, B., Lundberg, J. O., Weitzberg, E., Larsen, F. J. Dynamic regulation of metabolic efficiency explains tolerance to acute hypoxia in humans.

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