Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Apró, William
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Influence of supplementation with branched-chain amino acids in combination with resistance exercise on p70S6 kinase phosphorylation in resting and exercising human skeletal muscle.2010In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 200, no 3, p. 237-48Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Skeletal muscle growth is thought to be regulated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, which can be activated by resistance exercise and branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). The major aim of the present study was to distinguish between the influence of resistance exercise and BCAA on key enzymes considered to be involved in the regulation of protein synthesis, including p70(S6) kinase (p70(S6k)). METHODS: Nine healthy subjects (four men and five women) performed unilateral resistance exercise on two occasions separated by 1 month. Subjects were randomly supplied either a mixture of BCAA or flavoured water. Muscle biopsies were taken from both resting and exercising muscle before, after and 1 h after exercise. RESULTS: Phosphorylation of Akt was unaltered by either resistance exercise and/or BCAA supplementation whereas mTOR phosphorylation was enhanced (P<0.05) to a similar extent in both exercising and resting muscle following exercise in the absence (70-90%) and presence of BCAA supplementation (80-130%). Phosphorylation of p70(S6k) was unaffected by resistance exercise alone; however, BCAA intake increased (P<0.05) this phosphorylation in both legs following exercise. In resting muscle, a 5- and 16-fold increase in p70(S6k) was observed immediately after and 1 h after exercise, respectively, as compared to 11- and 30-fold increases in the exercising muscle. Phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 was attenuated 1 h after exercise (P<0.05) in both resting (10-40%) and exercising muscle (30-50%) under both conditions. CONCLUSION: The present findings indicate that resistance exercise and BCAA exert both separate and combined effects on the p70(S6k) phosphorylation in an Akt-independent manner.

  • 2. Bakkman, Linda
    et al.
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Holmberg, H-C
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Quantitative and qualitative adaptation of human skeletal muscle mitochondria to hypoxic compared with normoxic training at the same relative work rate.2007In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 190, no 3, p. 243-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To investigate if training during hypoxia (H) improves the adaptation of muscle oxidative function compared with normoxic (N) training performed at the same relative intensity. METHOD: Eight untrained volunteers performed one-legged cycle training during 4 weeks in a low-pressure chamber. One leg was trained under N conditions and the other leg under hypobaric hypoxia (526 mmHg) at the same relative intensity as during N (65% of maximal power output, W(max)). Muscle biopsies were taken from vastus lateralis before and after the training period. Muscle samples were analysed for the activities of oxidative enzymes [citrate synthase (CS) and cytochrome c oxidase (COX)] and mitochondrial respiratory function. RESULTS: W(max) increased with more than 30% over the training period during both N and H. CS activity increased significantly after training during N conditions (+20.8%, P < 0.05) but remained unchanged after H training (+4.5%, ns) with a significant difference between conditions (P < 0.05 H vs. N). COX activity was not significantly changed by training and was not different between exercise conditions [+14.6 (N) vs. -2.3% (H), ns]. Maximal ADP stimulated respiration (state 3) expressed per weight of muscle tended to increase after N (+31.2%, P < 0.08) but not after H training (+3.2%, ns). No changes were found in state four respiration, respiratory control index, P/O ratio, mitochondrial Ca(2+) resistance and apparent Km for oxygen. CONCLUSION: The training-induced increase in muscle oxidative function observed during N was abolished during H. Altitude training may thus be disadvantageous for adaptation of muscle oxidative function.

  • 3.
    Boushel, Robert
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Ara, I
    Gnaiger, E
    Helge, J W
    González-Alonso, J
    Munck-Andersen, T
    Sondergaard, H
    Damsgaard, R
    van Hall, G
    Saltin, B
    Calbet, J A L
    Low-intensity training increases peak arm VO2 by enhancing both convective and diffusive O2 delivery.2014In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 211, no 1, p. 122-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: It is an ongoing discussion the extent to which oxygen delivery and oxygen extraction contribute to an increased muscle oxygen uptake during dynamic exercise. It has been proposed that local muscle factors including the capillary bed and mitochondrial oxidative capacity play a large role in prolonged low-intensity training of a small muscle group when the cardiac output capacity is not directly limiting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relative roles of circulatory and muscle metabolic mechanisms by which prolonged low-intensity exercise training alters regional muscle VO2 .

    METHODS: In nine healthy volunteers (seven males, two females), haemodynamic and metabolic responses to incremental arm cycling were measured by the Fick method and biopsy of the deltoid and triceps muscles before and after 42 days of skiing for 6 h day(-1) at 60% max heart rate.

    RESULTS: Peak pulmonary VO2 during arm crank was unchanged after training (2.38 ± 0.19 vs. 2.18 ± 0.2 L min(-1) pre-training) yet arm VO2 (1.04 ± 0.08 vs. 0.83 ± 0.1 L min(1) , P < 0.05) and power output (137 ± 9 vs. 114 ± 10 Watts) were increased along with a higher arm blood flow (7.9 ± 0.5 vs. 6.8 ± 0.6 L min(-1) , P < 0.05) and expanded muscle capillary volume (76 ± 7 vs. 62 ± 4 mL, P < 0.05). Muscle O2 diffusion capacity (16.2 ± 1 vs. 12.5 ± 0.9 mL min(-1)  mHg(-1) , P < 0.05) and O2 extraction (68 ± 1 vs. 62 ± 1%, P < 0.05) were enhanced at a similar mean capillary transit time (569 ± 43 vs. 564 ± 31 ms) and P50 (35.8 ± 0.7 vs. 35 ± 0.8), whereas mitochondrial O2 flux capacity was unchanged (147 ± 6 mL kg min(-1) vs. 146 ± 8 mL kg min(-1) ).

    CONCLUSION: The mechanisms underlying the increase in peak arm VO2 with prolonged low-intensity training in previously untrained subjects are an increased convective O2 delivery specifically to the muscles of the arm combined with a larger capillary-muscle surface area that enhance diffusional O2 conductance, with no apparent role of mitochondrial respiratory capacity.

  • 4. Calbet, J A L
    et al.
    Boushel, Robert
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Robach, P
    Hellsten, Y
    Saltin, B
    Lundby, C
    Chronic hypoxia increases arterial blood pressure and reduces adenosine and ATP induced vasodilatation in skeletal muscle in healthy humans.2014In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 211, no 4, p. 574-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To determine the role played by adenosine, ATP and chemoreflex activation on the regulation of vascular conductance in chronic hypoxia.

    METHODS: The vascular conductance response to low and high doses of adenosine and ATP was assessed in ten healthy men. Vasodilators were infused into the femoral artery at sea level and then after 8-12 days of residence at 4559 m above sea level. At sea level, the infusions were carried out while the subjects breathed room air, acute hypoxia (FI O2 = 0.11) and hyperoxia (FI O2 = 1); and at altitude (FI O2 = 0.21 and 1). Skeletal muscle P2Y2 receptor protein expression was determined in muscle biopsies after 4 weeks at 3454 m by Western blot.

    RESULTS: At altitude, mean arterial blood pressure was 13% higher (91 ± 2 vs. 102 ± 3 mmHg, P < 0.05) than at sea level and was unaltered by hyperoxic breathing. Baseline leg vascular conductance was 25% lower at altitude than at sea level (P < 0.05). At altitude, the high doses of adenosine and ATP reduced mean arterial blood pressure by 9-12%, independently of FI O2 . The change in vascular conductance in response to ATP was lower at altitude than at sea level by 24 and 38%, during the low and high ATP doses respectively (P < 0.05), and by 22% during the infusion with high adenosine doses. Hyperoxic breathing did not modify the response to vasodilators at sea level or at altitude. P2Y2 receptor expression remained unchanged with altitude residence.

    CONCLUSIONS: Short-term residence at altitude increases arterial blood pressure and reduces the vasodilatory responses to adenosine and ATP.

  • 5.
    Cardinale, Daniele A.
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Larsen, Filip J
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Jensen-Urstad, M
    Karolinska institutet.
    Rullman, E
    Karolinska institutet.
    Søndergaard, H
    Rigshospitalet, Köpenhamn, Danmark.
    Morales-Alamo, D
    University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spanien.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Calbet, J A L
    University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spanien.
    Boushel, Robert
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
    Muscle mass and inspired oxygen influence oxygen extraction at maximal exercise: role of mitochondrial oxygen affinity.2019In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 225, no 1, article id e13110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:We examined the Fick components together with mitochondrial O2 affinity (p50mito ) in defining O2 extraction and O2 uptake during exercise with large and small muscle mass during normoxia (NORM) and hyperoxia (HYPER).

    METHODS:Seven individuals performed two incremental exercise tests to exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer (BIKE) and two on a one-legged knee extension ergometer (KE) in NORM or HYPER. Leg blood flow and VO2 were determined by thermodilution and the Fick method. Maximal ADP-stimulated mitochondrial respiration (OXPHOS) and p50mito were measured ex vivo in isolated mitochondria. Mitochondrial excess capacity in the leg was determined from OXPHOS in permeabilized fibers and muscle mass measured with magnetic resonance imaging in relation to peak leg O2 delivery.

    RESULTS:The ex vivo p50mito increased from 0.06±0.02 to 0.17±0.04 kPa with varying substrate supply and O2 flux rates from 9.84±2.91 to 16.34±4.07 pmol O2 ·s-1 ·μg-1 respectively. O2 extraction decreased from 83% in BIKE to 67% in KE as a function of a higher O2 delivery, and lower mitochondrial excess capacity. There was a significant relationship between O2 extraction and mitochondrial excess capacity and p50mito that was unrelated to blood flow and mean transit time.

    CONCLUSION:O2 extraction varies with mitochondrial respiration rate, p50mito and O2 delivery. Mitochondrial excess capacity maintains a low p50mito which enhances O2 diffusion from microvessels to mitochondria during exercise. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Esbjörnsson, M
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rundqvist, H C
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Mascher, H
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Österlund, T
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rooyackers, O
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Jansson, E
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Sprint exercise enhances skeletal muscle p70S6k phosphorylation and more so in women than in men.2012In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 205, no 3, p. 411-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Sprint exercise is characterized by repeated sessions of brief intermittent exercise at a high relative workload. However, little is known about the effect on mTOR pathway, an important link in the regulation of muscle protein synthesis. An earlier training study showed a greater increase in muscle fibre cross-sectional area in women than men. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the activation of mTOR signalling is more pronounced in women than in men. Healthy men (n=9) and women (n=8) performed three bouts of 30-s sprint exercise with 20-min rest in between.

    METHODS: Multiple blood samples were collected over time, and muscle biopsy specimens were obtained at rest and 140 min after the last sprint.

    RESULTS: Serum insulin increased by sprint exercise and more so in women than in men [gender (g) × time (t)]: P=0.04. In skeletal muscle, phosphorylation of Akt increased by 50% (t, P=0.001) and mTOR by 120% (t, P=0.002) independent of gender. The elevation in p70S6k phosphorylation was larger in women (g × t, P=0.03) and averaged 230% (P=0.006) as compared to 60% in men (P=0.04). Phosphorylation rpS6 increased by 660% over time independent of gender (t, P=0.003). Increase in the phosphorylation of p70S6k was directly related to increase in serum insulin (r=0.68, P=0.004).

    CONCLUSION: It is concluded that repeated 30-s all-out bouts of sprint exercise separated by 20 min of rest increases Akt/mTOR signalling in skeletal muscle. Secondly, signalling downstream of mTOR was stronger in women than in men after sprint exercise indicated by the increased phosphorylation of p70S6k.

  • 7.
    Flockhart, Mikael
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Tischer, Dominik
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Nilsson, Lina C.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Blackwood, Sarah J
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Katz, Abram
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Apro, William
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics. Department of Clinical Sciences, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Larsen, Filip J
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Reduced glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity after prolonged exercise in endurance athletes.2023In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 238, no 4, article id e13972Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The purpose of this study was to 1. investigate if glucose tolerance is affected after one acute bout of different types of exercise; 2. assess if potential differences between two exercise paradigms are related to changes in mitochondrial function; and 3. determine if endurance athletes differ from nonendurance-trained controls in their metabolic responses to the exercise paradigms.

    METHODS: Nine endurance athletes (END) and eight healthy nonendurance-trained controls (CON) were studied. Oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) and mitochondrial function were assessed on three occasions: in the morning, 14 h after an overnight fast without prior exercise (RE), as well as after 3 h of prolonged continuous exercise at 65% of VO2 max (PE) or 5 × 4 min at ~95% of VO2 max (HIIT) on a cycle ergometer.

    RESULTS: Glucose tolerance was markedly reduced in END after PE compared with RE. END also exhibited elevated fasting serum FFA and ketones levels, reduced insulin sensitivity and glucose oxidation, and increased fat oxidation during the OGTT. CON showed insignificant changes in glucose tolerance and the aforementioned measurements compared with RE. HIIT did not alter glucose tolerance in either group. Neither PE nor HIIT affected mitochondrial function in either group. END also exhibited increased activity of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase activity in muscle extracts vs. CON.

    CONCLUSION: Prolonged exercise reduces glucose tolerance and increases insulin resistance in endurance athletes the following day. These findings are associated with an increased lipid load, a high capacity to oxidize lipids, and increased fat oxidation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 8.
    Hammarström, Daniel
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics. Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Øfsteng, Sjur J
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Jacobsen, Nicolai B
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Flobergseter, Krister B
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Rønnestad, Bent R
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Ellefsen, Stian
    Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences, Lillehammer, Norway; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway.
    Ribosome accumulation during early phase resistance training in humans.2022In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 235, no 1, article id e13806Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe ribosome biogenesis during resistance training, its relation to training volume and muscle growth.

    METHODS: A training group (n = 11) performed 12 sessions (3-4 sessions per week) of unilateral knee extension with constant and variable volume (6 and 3-9 sets per session respectively) allocated to either leg. Ribosome abundance and biogenesis markers were assessed from vastus lateralis biopsies obtained at baseline, 48 hrs after sessions 1, 4, 5, 8, 9, and 12, and after eight days of de-training, and from a control group (n = 8). Muscle thickness was measured before and after the intervention.

    RESULTS: Training led to muscle growth (3.9% over baseline values, 95% CrI: [0.2, 7.5] vs. control) with concomitant increases in total RNA, rRNA, UBF, and rpS6 with no differences between volume conditions. Total RNA increased rapidly in response to the first four sessions (8.6% [5.6, 11.7] per session), followed by a plateau and peak values after session 8 (49.5% [34.5, 66.5] above baseline). Total RNA abundance was associated with UBF protein levels (5.0% [0.2, 10.2] per unit UBF), and the rate of increase in total RNA levels predicted hypertrophy (0.3 mm [0.1, 0.4] per %-point increase in total RNA per session). After de-training, total RNA decreased (-19.3% [-29.0, -8.1]) without muscle mass changes indicating halted biosynthesis of ribosomes.

    CONCLUSION: Ribosomes accumulate in the initial phase of resistance training with abundances sensitive to training cessation and associated with UBF protein levels. The average accumulation rate predicts muscle training-induced hypertrophy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9. Hiensch, Anouk E
    et al.
    Bolam, Kate
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mijwel, Sara
    Jeneson, Jeroen A L
    Huitema, Alwin D R
    Kranenburg, Onno
    van der Wall, Elsken
    Rundqvist, Helene
    Wengstrom, Yvönne
    May, Anne M
    Doxorubicin-induced skeletal muscle atrophy: Elucidating the underlying molecular pathways.2020In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 229, no 2, article id e13400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Loss of skeletal muscle mass is a common clinical finding in cancer patients. The purpose of this meta-analysis and systematic review was to quantify the effect of doxorubicin on skeletal muscle and report on the proposed molecular pathways possibly leading to doxorubicin-induced muscle atrophy in both human and animal models.

    METHODS: A systematic search of the literature was conducted in PubMed, EMBASE, Web of Science and CENTRAL databases. The internal validity of included studies was assessed using SYRCLE's risk of bias tool.

    RESULTS: Twenty eligible articles were identified. No human studies were identified as being eligible for inclusion. Doxorubicin significantly reduced skeletal muscle weight (ie EDL, TA, gastrocnemius and soleus) by 14% (95% CI: 9.9; 19.3) and muscle fibre cross-sectional area by 17% (95% CI: 9.0; 26.0) when compared to vehicle controls. Parallel to negative changes in muscle mass, muscle strength was even more decreased in response to doxorubicin administration. This review suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a central role in doxorubicin-induced skeletal muscle atrophy. The increased production of ROS plays a key role within this process. Furthermore, doxorubicin activated all major proteolytic systems (ie calpains, the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and autophagy) in the skeletal muscle. Although each of these proteolytic pathways contributes to doxorubicin-induced muscle atrophy, the activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is hypothesized to play a key role. Finally, a limited number of studies found that doxorubicin decreases protein synthesis by a disruption in the insulin signalling pathway.

    CONCLUSION: The results of the meta-analysis show that doxorubicin induces skeletal muscle atrophy in preclinical models. This effect may be explained by various interacting molecular pathways. Results from preclinical studies provide a robust setting to investigate a possible dose-response, separate the effects of doxorubicin from tumour-induced atrophy and to examine underlying molecular pathways. More research is needed to confirm the proposed signalling pathways in humans, paving the way for potential therapeutic approaches.

  • 10.
    Larsen, Filip
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Effects of dietary nitrate on oxygen cost during exercise2007In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 1, p. 59-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Nitric oxide (NO), synthesized from l-arginine by NO synthases, plays a role in adaptation to physical exercise by modulating blood flow, muscular contraction and glucose uptake and in the control of cellular respiration. Recent studies show that NO can be formed in vivo also from the reduction of inorganic nitrate (NO(3) (-)) and nitrite (NO(2) (-)). The diet constitutes a major source of nitrate, and vegetables are particularly rich in this anion. The aim of this study was to investigate if dietary nitrate had any effect on metabolic and circulatory parameters during exercise. METHOD: In a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study, we tested the effect of dietary nitrate on physiological and metabolic parameters during exercise. Nine healthy young well-trained men performed submaximal and maximal work tests on a cycle ergometer after two separate 3-day periods of dietary supplementation with sodium nitrate (0.1 mmol kg(-1) day-1) or an equal amount of sodium chloride (placebo). RESULTS: The oxygen cost at submaximal exercise was reduced after nitrate supplementation compared with placebo. On an average Vo(2) decreased from 2.98 +/- 0.57 during CON to 2.82 +/- 0.58 L min(-1) during NIT (P < 0.02) over the four lowest submaximal work rates. Gross efficiency increased from 19.7 +/- 1.6 during CON to 21.1 +/- 1.3% during NIT (P < 0.01) over the four lowest work rates. There was no difference in heart rate, lactate [Hla], ventilation (VE), VE/Vo(2) or respiratory exchange ratio between nitrate and placebo during any of the submaximal work rates. CONCLUSION: We conclude that dietary nitrate supplementation, in an amount achievable through a diet rich in vegetables, results in a lower oxygen demand during submaximal work. This highly surprising effect occurred without an accompanying increase in lactate concentration, indicating that the energy production had become more efficient. The mechanism of action needs to be clarified but a likely first step is the in vivo reduction of dietary nitrate into bioactive nitrogen oxides including nitrite and NO.

  • 11.
    Larsen, Filip J
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Schiffer, T A
    Karolinska insitutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Zinner, C
    University of Applied Sciences for Police and Administration of Hesse, Wiesbaden, Germany.
    Willis, S J
    University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Morales-Alamo, D
    University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Gran Canaria, Spain.
    Calbet, Jal
    University of Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Gran Canaria, Spain.
    Boushel, R
    The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada..
    Holmberg, H C
    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden..
    Mitochondrial oxygen affinity increases after sprint interval training and is related to the improvement in peak oxygen uptake.2020In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 229, no 3, article id e13463Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: The body responds to exercise training by profound adaptations throughout the cardiorespiratory and muscular systems, which may result in improvements in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) and mitochondrial capacity. By convenience, mitochondrial respiration is often measured at supra-physiological oxygen levels, an approach that ignores any potential regulatory role of mitochondrial affinity for oxygen (p50mito ) at physiological oxygen levels.

    METHODS: In this study, we examined the p50mito of mitochondria isolated from the Vastus lateralis and Triceps brachii in 12 healthy volunteers before and after a training intervention with 7 sessions of sprint interval training using both leg cycling and arm cranking. The changes in p50mito were compared to changes in whole-body VO2 peak.

    RESULTS: We here show that p50mito is similar in isolated mitochondria from the Vastus (40 ± 3.8 Pa) compared to Triceps (39 ± 3.3) but decreases (mitochondrial oxygen affinity increases) after 7 sessions of sprint interval training (to 26 ± 2.2 Pa in Vastus and 22 ± 2.7 Pa in Triceps, both p<0.01). The change in VO2 peak modeled from changes in p50mito was correlated to actual measured changes in VO2 peak (R2 =0.41, p=0.002).

    CONCLUSION: Together with mitochondrial respiratory capacity, p50mito is a critical factor when measuring mitochondrial function, it can decrease with sprint interval training and should be considered in the integrative analysis of the oxygen cascade from lung to mitochondria.

  • 12.
    Lilja, Mats
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Mandić, Mirko
    Karolinska institutet.
    Apró, William
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.
    Melin, Michael
    Karolinska institutet.
    Olsson, Karl
    Karolinska institutet.
    Rosenborg, Staffan
    Karolinska institutet.
    Gustafsson, Thomas
    Karolinska institutet.
    Lundberg, Tommy R
    Karolinska institutet.
    High-doses of anti-inflammatory drugs compromise muscle strength and hypertrophic adaptations to resistance training in young adults.2018In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 222, no 2, article id e12948Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This study tested the hypothesis that high doses of anti-inflammatory drugs would attenuate the adaptive response to resistance training compared with low doses.

    METHODS: Healthy men and women (aged 18-35 years) were randomly assigned to daily consumption of ibuprofen (IBU; 1200 mg; n=15) or acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 75 mg; n=16) for 8 weeks. During this period, subjects completed supervised knee-extensor resistance training where one leg was subjected to training with maximal volitional effort in each repetition using a flywheel ergometer (FW), while the other leg performed conventional (work-matched across groups) weight-stack training (WS). Before and after training, muscle volume (MRI) and strength were assessed, and muscle biopsies were analysed for gene and protein expression of muscle growth regulators.

    RESULTS: The increase in m. quadriceps volume was similar between FW and WS, yet was (averaged across legs) greater in ASA (7.5%) compared with IBU (3.7%, group difference 34 cm(3) ; P=0.029). In the WS leg, muscle strength improved similarly (11-20%) across groups. In the FW leg, increases (10-23%) in muscle strength were evident in both groups yet they were generally greater (interaction effects P<0.05) for ASA compared with IBU. While our molecular analysis revealed several training effects, the only group interaction (P<0.0001) arose from a down-regulated mRNA expression of IL-6 in IBU.

    CONCLUSION: Maximal over-the-counter doses of ibuprofen attenuate strength and muscle hypertrophic adaptations to 8 weeks of resistance training in young adults. Thus, young individuals using resistance training to maximise muscle growth or strength should avoid excessive intake of anti-inflammatory drugs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Mascher, Henrik
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Andersson, H
    Nilsson, P-A
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Changes in signalling pathways regulating protein synthesis in human muscle in the recovery period after endurance exercise.2007In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 1, p. 67-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Exercise induced alterations in the rate of muscle protein synthesis may be related to activity changes in signalling pathways involved in protein synthesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether such changes in enzyme phosphorylation occur after endurance exercise. METHODS: Six male subjects performed ergometer cycling exercise for 1 h at 75% of the maximal oxygen uptake. Muscle biopsy samples from the vastus lateralis were taken before, immediately after, 30 min, 1 h, 2 h and 3 h after exercise for the determination of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), glycogen synthase 3 kinase (GSK-3), p70S6 kinase (p70(S6k)) and eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2) phosphorylation. RESULTS: The phosphorylation of Akt was unchanged directly after exercise, but two- to fourfold increased 1 and 2 h after the exercise, whereas GSK-3alpha and beta phosphorylation were two- to fourfold elevated throughout most of the 3-h recovery period. Phosphorylation of mTOR was elevated threefold directly after, 30 min and 2 h after exercise and eEF2 phosphorylation was decreased by 35-75% from 30 min to 3 h-recovery. Exercise led to a five- to eightfold increase in Ser(424)/Thr(421) phosphorylation of p70(S6k) up to 30 min after exercise, but no change in Thr(389) phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: The marked decrease in eEF2 phosphorylation suggests an activation of translation elongation and possibly protein synthesis in the recovery period after sustained endurance exercise. The lack of p70(S6k) activation suggests that translation initiation is activated via alternative pathways, possibly via the activation of eukaryotic initiating factor 2B.

  • 14.
    Mascher, Henrik
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Ekblom, Björn
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
    Rooyackers, Olav
    Blomstrand, Eva
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Eva Blomstrand's research group.
    Enhanced rates of muscle protein synthesis and elevated mTOR signalling following endurance exercise in human subjects.2011In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 202, no 2, p. 175-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The major aim of this study was to determine the fractional rate of protein synthesis (FSR) during the early period of recovery after intensive aerobic exercise in the absence of nutritional supplementation.

    METHODS: Sixteen male subjects performed one-legged cycling exercise for 1 h at approx. 65-70% of their one-legged maximal oxygen uptake. Using the stable isotope technique, the FSR in the vastus lateralis of both legs were determined during two periods, 0-90 min (n = 8) and 90-180 min (n = 8) after exercise. Biopsies were taken from both exercising and resting muscle before exercise, immediately after and following 90 or 180 min of recovery.

    RESULTS: During the initial 90 min of recovery, FSR in the exercising muscle tended to be higher than in the resting muscle (1.57 ± 0.12 vs. 1.44 ± 0.07% 24 h(-1); P = 0.1) and was significantly higher during the period 90-180 min after exercise (1.74 ± 0.14 vs. 1.43 ± 0.12% 24 h(-1) ; P < 0.05). Exercise induced a 60% increase (P < 0.05) in phosphorylation of mTOR and a fivefold increase (P < 0.05) in Thr(389) phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase as well as a 30% reduction (P < 0.05) in phosphorylation of eEF2. Phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase was enhanced by 40% (P < 0.05) after exercise, but no significant effect on phosphorylation of Akt, or eIF2Bε was observed immediately after exercise.

    CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that during the first 3 h of recovery after intensive endurance exercise FSR gradually increases. Moreover, a stimulation of the mTOR-signalling pathway may be at least partially responsible for this elevated protein synthesis.

  • 15.
    Moberg, Marcus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics. Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Apro, William
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics. Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Horwath, Oscar
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    van Hall, Gerrit
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.; Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark..
    Blackwood, Sarah J
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Katz, Abram
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics.
    Acute normobaric hypoxia blunts contraction-mediated mTORC1- and JNK-signaling in human skeletal muscle.2022In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 234, no 2, article id e13771Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Hypoxia has been shown to reduce resistance exercise-induced stimulation of protein synthesis and long-term gains in muscle mass. However, the mechanism whereby hypoxia exerts its effect is not clear. Here we examine the effect of acute hypoxia on the activity of several signaling pathways involved in regulation of muscle growth following a bout of resistance exercise.

    METHODS: Eight men performed two sessions of leg resistance exercise in Normoxia or Hypoxia (12% O2 ) in a randomized crossover fashion. Muscle biopsies were obtained at rest and at 0, 90,180 min after exercise. Muscle analyses included levels of signaling proteins and metabolites associated with energy turnover.

    RESULTS: Exercise during Normoxia induced a 5-10-fold increase of S6K1Thr389 phosphorylation throughout the recovery period, but Hypoxia blunted the increases by ~50%. Phosphorylation of JNKThr183/Tyr185 and the JNK target SMAD2Ser245/250/255 was increased by 30-40-fold immediately after exercise in Normoxia, but Hypoxia blocked almost 70% of the activation. Throughout recovery, phosphorylation of JNK and SMAD2 remained elevated following exercise in Normoxia, but the effect of Hypoxia was lost at 90-180 min post-exercise. Hypoxia had no effect on exercise induced Hippo- or autophagy-signaling and ubiquitin-proteasome related protein levels. Nor did Hypoxia alter the changes induced by exercise in high energy phosphates, glucose 6-P, lactate, or phosphorylation of AMPK or ACC.

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that acute severe hypoxia inhibits resistance exercise induced mTORC1- and JNK signaling in human skeletal muscle, effects that do not appear to be mediated by changes in the degree of metabolic stress in the muscle.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Mitochondrial function during exercise2016In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 216, no S707, p. S06-1-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Sundqvist, Michaela L
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Physiology, Nutrition and Biomechanics. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Jon O
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Weitzberg, Eddie
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Carlström, Mattias
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Renal handling of nitrate in women and men with elevated blood pressure.2021In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 232, no 1, article id e13637Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The inorganic anions nitrate and nitrite are oxidation products of nitric oxide (NO) that have often been used as an index of NO generation. More than just being surrogate markers of NO, nitrate/nitrite can recycle to bioactive NO again. Nitrate is predominantly eliminated via the kidneys; however, there is less knowledge regarding tubular handling. The aim of this study, as part of a large randomized controlled trial, was to explore potential sex differences in renal nitrate handling during low and high dietary nitrate intake. We hypothesized that renal clearance and excretion of nitrate are higher in men compared to women.

    METHODS: In prehypertensive and hypertensive individuals (n = 231), nitrate and nitrite were measured in plasma and urine at low dietary nitrate intake (baseline) and after 5 weeks supplementation with nitrate (300 mg potassium nitrate/day) or placebo (300 mg potassium chloride/day). Twenty-four hours ambulatory blood pressure recordings and urine collections were conducted.

    RESULTS: At baseline, plasma nitrate and nitrite, as well as the downstream marker of NO signalling cyclic guanosine monophosphate, were similar in women and men. Approximately 80% of filtered nitrate was spared by the kidneys. Urinary nitrate concentration, amount of nitrate excreted, renal nitrate clearance (Cnitrate ) and fractional excretion of nitrate (FEnitrate ) were lower in women compared to men. No association was observed between plasma nitrate concentrations and glomerular filtration rate (GFR), nor between FEnitrate and GFR in either sex. After 5 weeks of nitrate supplementation plasma nitrate and nitrite increased significantly, but blood pressure remained unchanged. FEnitrate increased significantly and the sex difference observed at baseline disappeared.

    CONCLUSION: Our findings demonstrate substantial nitrate sparing capacity of the kidneys, which is higher in women compared to men. This suggests higher tubular nitrate reabsorption in women but the underlying mechanism(s) warrants further investigation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Tokuno, Craig D
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Carpenter, M G
    Thorstensson, Alf
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Garland, S J
    Cresswell, Andrew G
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Control of the triceps surae during the postural sway of quiet standing.2007In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 191, no 3, p. 229-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The present study investigated how the triceps surae are controlled at the spinal level during the naturally occurring postural sway of quiet standing. METHODS: Subjects stood on a force platform as electrical stimuli were applied to the posterior tibial nerve when the center of pressure (COP) was either 1.6 standard deviations anterior (COP(ant)) or posterior (COP(post)) to the mean baseline COP signal. Peak-to-peak amplitudes of the H-reflex and M-wave from the soleus (SOL) and medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscles were recorded to assess the efficacy of the Ia pathway. RESULTS: A significant increase in the H(max) : M(max) ratio for both the SOL (12 +/- 6%) and MG (23 +/- 6%) was observed during the COP(ant) as compared to the COP(post) condition. The source of the modulation between COP conditions cannot be determined from this study. However, the observed changes in the synaptic efficacy of the Ia pathway are unlikely to be simply a result of an altered level of background electromyographic activity in the triceps surae. This was indicated by the lack of differences observed in the H(max) : M(max) ratio when subjects stood without postural sway (via the use of a tilt table) at two levels of background activity. CONCLUSIONS: It is suggested that the phase-dependent modulation of the triceps surae H-reflexes during the postural sway of quiet standing functions to maintain upright stance and may explain the results from previous studies, which, until now, had not taken the influence of postural sway on the H-reflex into consideration.

  • 19.
    Wang, Li
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    Sahlin, Kent
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
    The effect of continuous and interval exercise on PGC-1α and PDK4 mRNA in type I and type II fibres of human skeletal muscle.2012In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, Vol. 204, no 4, p. 525-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Differences in fibre-type recruitment during exercise may induce a heterogenic response in fibre-type gene expression. We have investigated the effect of two different exercise protocols on the fibre-type-specific expression of master genes involved in oxidative metabolism [proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and Pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4)].

    METHODS: Untrained subjects (n = 7) completed 90-min cycling either at a constant intensity [continuous exercise (CE): approximately 60% of VO(2max) ] or as interval exercise (IE: approximately 120/20% VO(2max) , duty cycle 12/18s). Muscle samples were taken before (pre) and 3 h after (post) exercise. Single fibres were isolated from freeze-dried muscle and characterized as type I or type II. The cDNA from two fibres of the same type was pooled and mRNA analysed with reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR.

    RESULTS: Continuous exercise and IE elicited a small increase in blood lactate (<2.5 mM) and moderate glycogen depletion (<40%) without difference between exercise modes. The mRNA of PGC-1α and PDK4 increased 5- to 8-fold in both fibre types after exercise, and the relative increase was negatively correlated with the basal level. However, the mRNA of PGC-1α and PDK4 was not different between type I and II fibres neither pre nor post, and there was no difference in the exercise-induced response between fibre types or exercise modes.

    CONCLUSION: We conclude that the mRNA of PGC-1α and PDK4 increases markedly in both fibre types after prolonged exercise without difference between CE and IE. The similar response between fibre types may relate to that subjects were sedentary and that the metabolic stress was low.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf