Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Cresswell, A G
    et al.
    Thorstensson, Alf
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    The role of the abdominal musculature in the elevation of the intra-abdominal pressure during specified tasks.1989In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 1237-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of standardized tasks, isometric trunk flexion and extension and maximal Valsalva manoeuvres, were used to evaluate the role of the abdominal musculature in developing an increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP). Seven male subjects were measured for IAP, myoelectric activity of rectus abdominis (RA), obliquus externus and internus (OE and OI respectively), erector spinae (ES) and isometric trunk torque. IAPs in all experimental conditions were markedly greater than those that occurred while relaxed. In isometric trunk flexion, IAPs were increased with accompanying high levels of activity from the abdominal muscles. In contrast, little activity from the abdominal muscles occurred during isometric trunk extension, although levels of IAP were similar to those found in the isometric flexion condition. With maximal voluntary pressurization (Valsalva manoeuvre) slightly higher levels of IAP than those found in torque conditions were recorded, this pressure being produced with abdominal activities (OE and OI) less than one fourth their recorded maximum. When isometric torque tasks were added to the Valsalva manoeuvre, patterns of muscle activity (RA, OE, OI and ES) were significantly altered. For Valsalva with isometric trunk extension, activity from OE and OI was reduced while IAPs remained fairly constant. These findings indicate that in tasks where an IAP extension moment is warranted, abdominal pressure can be increased without the development of a large counter-moment produced by the dual action of the trunk flexors. Activation of other muscles such as the diaphragm and transversus abdominis is suggested as helping provide control over the level of IAP during controlled trunk tasks.

  • 2. Huang, Q M
    et al.
    Sato, M
    Thorstensson, Alf
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Pulling force in lateral lifting and lowering.1998In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 41, no 6, p. 899-908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work investigated maximal voluntary lateral hand pulling force in 18 healthy, habitually active men. Measurements were made in standing at different static angles of lateral trunk flexion, as well as at different constant lifting and lowering velocities. Movement was constrained to the frontal plane, velocity was controlled by an isokinetic dynamometer, pulling force was measured with a strain gauge and overall lateral angular displacement of the trunk by an electrogoniometer. Mean peak pulling force values ranged from 478 to 658 N (static), 291 to 528 N (lifting), and 801 to 911 N (lowering), respectively. The static pulling forces were the highest in flexed positions to the loaded side (10 degrees and 20 degrees trunk angles). In lifting, peak and position-specific pulling force decreased with increasing velocity. Peak lifting force occurred in a flexed trunk position of 7 to 9 degrees to the loaded side. In lowering, pulling forces were significantly higher than during lifting at corresponding velocities and showed less changes with velocity. Peak lowering force occurred at a trunk angle of -7 to -11 degrees, that is towards the unloaded side. In conclusion, maximal voluntary pulling force in the frontal plane was found to be task dependent. Lowering was accompanied by higher forces and a different velocity and position dependency than lifting which, in addition to the fact that the trunk muscles act predominantly eccentrically during the lowering task, may impose an increased risk of injury.

  • 3.
    Nolan, Lee
    et al.
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Lees, A
    Touch-down and take-off characteristics of the long jump performance of world level above- and below-knee amputee athletes.2000In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 43, no 10, p. 1637-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims of this study were to establish the take-off characteristics of long jump performance of disabled amputee athletes, and to establish to what extent amputee athletes conform to a model of performance defined for elite able-bodied athletes. The jumps of 8 male below-knee (trans-tibial) and 8 male above-knee (trans-femoral) amputee athletes who competed in the finals of the long jump at the 1998 World Disabled Championships were recorded in the sagittal plane on video (50 Hz). Approach speed was measured using a laser Doppler system. The best jump for each athlete was digitized, and kinematic data from the key instants of touch-down (TD), maximum knee flexion (MKF) and take-off (TO) were obtained. Amputees demonstrated a lower approach speed and jumped less far than able-bodied athletes although below-knee amputees performed better than above-knee amputees. For each amputee group there was a significant (p < 0.05) linear relationship between approach speed and distance jumped. With the exception of their slower horizontal speed and greater negative vertical speed at touch-down, below-knee amputees demonstrated characteristics of technique that were similar to elite able-bodied long jumpers. Above-knee amputees at touchdown had a more upright trunk, smaller hip and knee angles and consequently a smaller leg angle. This was attributed to the difficulty of taking off on the last stride on the prosthetic limb. Consequently, above-knee amputees were less able to gain vertical velocity during the compression (TD-MKF) phase, but were able to compensate for this by using a greater hip range of motion during the extension (MKF-TO) phase. It was concluded that below-knee amputees displayed the same basic jumping technique as elite able-bodied long jumpers, but above-knee amputees did not. These findings have implications for the training and technical preparation of amputee long jumpers.

  • 4. Rose, Linda M
    et al.
    Neumann, W Patrick
    Hägg, Göran M
    Kenttä, Göran
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
    Fatigue and recovery during and after static loading.2014In: Ergonomics, ISSN 0014-0139, E-ISSN 1366-5847, Vol. 57, no 11, p. 1696-1710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subjectively assessed endurance time (ET), resumption time (RT) and perceived discomfort, pain or fatigue (PD), and objectively measured maximum force-exerting capacity were investigated for varying loads and durations of a pushing task with two repeated trials. Beyond the main results quantifying how the load scenario affected ET, RT and PD, three additional results are of note: (1) although the maximum pushing force did not change between trials, shorter ET, longer RT and higher PD indicated accumulation of fatigue in Trial 2; (2) the PD ratings showed a trend with a linear increase during loading and a curvilinear decrease during recovery; and (3) the RT and the load level for different relative loading times were found to have an unexpected U-shaped relationship, indicating lowest fatigue at the intermediate load level. These results can be used to model a more sustainable and productive work-recovery ratio.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf