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  • 1.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för barn- och ungdomsvetenskap.
    Aesthetic learning processes – feelings and sensations of skate- and snowboarding2008In: Designs for learning: Defining the field, 2008, p. 1-Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Skateboarding and snowboarding are practices loaded with symbolic expressions. They are also activities profoundly understood as physical. This paper will investigate the narrated impressions of these activities – in other words the expressions of impressions. Skateboarding and snowboarding are discussed as aesthetic learning processes, which to a large extent are both bodily and informal. The paper builds on ethnographic fieldwork and cultural analysis. Kirsten Drotner’s theory of aesthetic practices is used as a starting point. Aesthetic practices/production works on three levels: the individual, the social and the cultural. The individual level is characterised in terms of emotional intensity and corporality. The sensation is described as so encompassing that it becomes ones life, ones identity. The body is acutely present in these descriptions. It is the body that experiences, and it is there that the sensation of riding comes alive.

  • 2.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för barn- och ungdomsvetenskap.
    Good ethnography smells bad: On aesthetic experience in qualitative research2008In: Sveriges antropologförbunds årliga konferens (SANT): Visuell kultur, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aesthetic learning processes are being notified in current Swedish pedagogical research. The philosophical term aesthetics is used in multiple modes, some of them borrowing an agenda from the studies of fine art, some more with inspiration from cultural studies and popular culture. In this emerging field both ethnography and every-day-aesthetics are in focus. Despite new ways of doing ethnography the results still tend to look (!) like traditional ethnography. Field-notes saturated with sensuous and stinking data; e.g. moist socks, sweaty t-shirts and car fumes, still tend to depend upon written texts and photography as scientific proof. Moreover ethnography is still judged against a positivistic framework drawing from natural science. Is a change required? And in that case, can the future of visual anthropology challenge this hegemonic scientific paradigm?

  • 3.
    Bäckström, Åsa
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för barn- och ungdomsvetenskap.
    Style in physical activity2008In: Bonds and Communities. Young people and their social ties.: The 10th Nordic Youth Research Information Symposium, 2008, p. 58-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aesthetic expressions in youth culture have been studied extensively. For the British CCCS and its followers the concept of style is regularly used to explain dress codes, hair fashion and other physical appearances. Sub culture is an often-used term, which enclose these types of expressions, in addition frequently connected to certain kinds music. Lately a growing number of studies on sub culture and sport have been presented. This implies an interest in a slightly different aspect of style – the one focusing more on style in physical activity. The leaderless boarding culture revolves primarily around style and physical bodily activity, in contrast to punk for example, which is held together by style and music. Thus it can be argued that identity through board sports is more clearly incorporated through physical performance. This presentation attempts to fill some of the gap in research around style in physical activity. It focuses bodily aesthetic expressions in skateboarding and the concept of style in relation to the moving body. Style in both senses mentioned above, communicates and creates both bonds and communities. Building on empirical studies on skateboarding in Sweden between 1978-2002, it is argued that also style in physical activity is significant for the construction of cultural and social values. Moreover style in this sense has a highly performative aspect.

  • 4.
    Kilger, Magnus
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.
    Hellström, John S.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport History Research Group.
    “- How does it feel right now?”: A narrative analysis of sports-interviews after performance2019In: The Society of the Study of Narrative Annual Conference, ISSN / [ed] James Phelan, Georgetown: Ohio State University Press, 2019Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Success stories and heroic tales are recurrently investigated narrative genres in literature (Propp, 1998), journalism (Lule, 2001) and, not the least, in sports (Hellström, 2014). In sports, we repeatedly hear athletes explain their performance at half-time or give us reflections on a recently completed competition. However, these stories are not produced in a social vacuum; they are part of a discursive framework and a product of time and place. The trajectories for a legitimate success story is limited and specific storylines are repeated and holds a specific dramaturgical structure. The heroic story typically follows a temporal structure, from a beginning to an end, where events and performances function as phases of a narrative journey towards a defining triumph (Hoebeke et al. 2011). Which performances that constitutes the highlight of an athlete’s career will always be culturally determined, since cultures produces heroes according to their own specific values and traditions (Whannel, 2002). Thereby, the “personal” story is both a contextually specific narrative and a culturally shared narrative.

     

    Aims and empirical material

    In this paper, we are seeking to investigate how success stories in sports as a central part of the athletes identity work, and how these stories also serve as symbols for values and morals of a wider sporting society (Kilger, 2017). Many narrative scholars within the area of sports have been interested in retrospective studies of sports heroes or historical media studies of successful athletes (Hargreaves, 2000; Hellström, 2014; Whannel, 2002). In this study, we would like to pay particular attention to how personal narratives are built ´in-action´ and study which narrative elements are recurrent in the interviews and how is the own performance explained. Accordingly, we are interested in how such narratives of success and failure are co-constructed in the interview interaction and how they are structured. By investigating which master narratives that the participants recruit in their personal stories, this can help us to uncover shared normative storylines in elite sports. Moreover, we would like to illuminate how the athletes are using ´temporal-identity´ in the interviews as a way to construct a legitimate story of performance.

     

    The data set will include after-performance media interviews from Swedish television (SVT) during the FIS Cross Country World Championships. More specifically, we are seeking to analyze between 15-20 after-race television interviews with Swedish athletes during the FIS Cross Country World Championships 2019 in Falun, Sweden.

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