Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Squair, J W
    Malik, R
    Lam, T
    Chen, Z
    Carpenter, M G
    Diagnostic accuracy of common clinical tests for assessing abdominal muscle function after motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6.2015In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 53, p. 114-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design:Diagnostic study.Objectives:The objective of this study was to compare patterns of electromyography (EMG) recordings of abdominal muscle function in persons with motor-complete spinal cord injury (SCI) above T6 and in able-bodied controls, and to determine whether manual examination or ultrasound measures of muscle activation can be accurate alternatives to EMG.Setting:Research center focused on SCI and University laboratory, Vancouver, Canada.Methods:Thirteen people with SCI (11 with American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) A and 2 AIS B; C4-T5), and 13 matched able-bodied participants volunteered for the study. Participants completed trunk tasks during manual examination of the abdominal muscles and then performed maximal voluntary isometric contractions, while EMG activity and muscle thickness changes were recorded. The frequency of muscle responses detected by manual examination and ultrasound were compared with detection by EMG (sensitivity and specificity).Results:All individuals with SCI were able to elicit EMG activity above resting levels in at least one abdominal muscle during one task. In general, the activation pattern was task specific, confirming voluntary control of the muscles. Ultrasound, when compared with EMG, showed low sensitivity but was highly specific in its ability to detect preserved abdominal muscle function in persons with SCI. Conversely, manual examination was more sensitive than ultrasound but showed lower specificity.Conclusion:The results from this study confirm preserved voluntary abdominal muscle function in individuals classified with motor-complete SCI above T6 and highlight the need for further research in developing more accurate clinical measures to diagnose the level of trunk muscle preservation in individuals with SCI.Spinal Cord advance online publication, 25 November 2014; doi:10.1038/sc.2014.202.

  • 2.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Squair, J W
    Malik, R
    Lam, T
    Chen, Z
    Carpenter, M G
    Response to 'Diagnostic accuracy of common clinical tests for assessing abdominal muscle function after motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6'.2015In: Spinal Cord, ISSN 1362-4393, E-ISSN 1476-5624, Vol. 53, no 12, p. 892-892Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bjerkefors, Anna
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
    Squair, Jordan W
    Chua, Romeo
    Lam, Tania
    Chen, Zhen
    Carpenter, Mark G
    Assessment of abdominal muscle function in individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation.2015In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 138-146Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To use transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography to assess the potential for preserved function in the abdominal muscles in individuals classified with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6. Subjects: Five individuals with spinal cord injury (C5-T3) and 5 able-bodied individuals. Methods: Transcranial magnetic stimulation was delivered over the abdominal region of primary motor cortex during resting and sub-maximal (or attempted) contractions. Surface electromyography was used to record motor-evoked potentials as well as maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions in the abdominal muscles and the diaphragm. Results: Responses to transcranial magnetic stimulation in the abdominal muscles occurred in all spinal cord injury subjects. Latencies of muscle response onsets were similar in both groups; however, peak-to-peak amplitudes were smaller in the spinal cord injury group. During maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions all spinal cord injury subjects were able to elicit electromyography activity above resting levels in more than one abdominal muscle across tasks. Conclusion: Individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury above T6 were able to activate abdominal muscles in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation and during maximal voluntary (or attempted) contractions. The activation was induced directly through corticospinal pathways, and not indirectly by stretch reflex activations of the diaphragm. Transcranial magnetic stimulation and electromyography measurements provide a useful method to assess motor preservation of abdominal muscles in persons with spinal cord injury.

  • 4. Hjeltnes, N
    et al.
    Fernström, Maria
    Karolinska institutet.
    Zierath, J R
    Krook, A
    Regulation of UCP2 and UCP3 by muscle disuse and physical activity in tetraplegic subjects.1999In: Diabetologia, ISSN 0012-186X, E-ISSN 1432-0428, Vol. 42, no 7, p. 826-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The regulation of uncoupling protein 2 and uncoupling protein 3 gene expression in skeletal muscle has recently been the focus of intense interest. Our aim was to determine expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 in skeletal muscle from tetraplegic subjects, a condition representing profound muscle inactivity. Thereafter we determined whether exercise training would modify expression of these genes in skeletal muscle.

    METHODS: mRNA expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 was determined using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain-reaction.

    RESULTS: Expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 mRNA was increased in skeletal muscle from tetraplegic compared with able-bodied subjects (3.7-fold p < 0.01 and 4.1-fold, p < 0.05, respectively). A subgroup of four tetraplegic subjects underwent an 8-week exercise programme consisting of electrically-stimulated leg cycling (ESLC, 7 ESLC sessions/week). This training protocol leads to increases in whole body insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and expression of genes involved in glucose metabolism in skeletal muscle from tetraplegic subjects. After ESLC training, uncoupling protein 2 expression was reduced by 62% and was similar to that in able-bodied people. Similarly, ESLC training was associated with a reduction of uncoupling protein 3 expression in skeletal muscle from three of four tetraplegic subjects, however, post-exercise levels remained increased compared with able-bodied subjects.

    CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: Tetraplegia is associated with increased mRNA expression of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 in skeletal muscle. Exercise training leads to normalisation of uncoupling protein 2 expression in tetraplegic subjects. Muscle disuse and physical activity appear to be powerful regulators of uncoupling protein 2 and 3 expression in human skeletal muscle.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf