Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Sports genetics moving forward - lessons learned from medical research
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences. (Forskningsgruppen för fysisk aktivitet, prestation och hälsa)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0642-4838
Stanford University. (Ashley Lab)
Stanford University. (Ashley Lab)
Stanford University. (Ashley Lab)
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Physiological Genomics, ISSN 1094-8341, E-ISSN 1531-2267, Vol. 48, no 3, 175-182 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sports genetics can take advantage of lessons learned from human disease genetics. By righting past mistakes and increasing scientific rigor, the breadth and depth of knowledge in the field can be magnified. We present an outline of challenges facing sports genetics in the light of experiences from medical research.

Sports performance is complex, resulting from a combination of a wide variety of different traits and attributes.  Improving sports genetics will foremost require analyses based on detailed phenotyping. In order to find widely valid, reproducible common variants associated with athletic phenotypes, study sample sizes must be dramatically increased. One paradox is that in order to confirm relevance, replications in specific populations must be undertaken. Family studies of athletes may facilitate the discovery of rare variants with large effects on athletic phenotypes. The complexity of the human genome, combined with the complexity of athletic phenotypes, will require additional metadata and biological validation to identify a comprehensive set of genes involved.

Analysis of personal genetic and multiomic profiles contribute to our conceptualization of precision medicine; the same will be the case in precision sports science. In the refinement of sports genetics it is essential to evaluate similarities and differences between genders and among ethnicities. Sports genetics to date have been hampered by small sample sizes and biased methodology which can lead to erroneous associations and overestimation of effect sizes. Consequently, currently available genetic tests based on these inherently limited data cannot predict athletic performance with any accuracy.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 48, no 3, 175-182 p.
Keyword [en]
Sports genetics, individual differences, genetic testing, sports medicine, precision medicine
National Category
Physiology Medical Genetics Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-4286DOI: 10.1152/physiolgenomics.00109.2015ISI: 000371298200002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-4286DiVA: diva2:893605
Projects
ELITE (Exercise at the Limit - Inherited Traits of Endurance)
Available from: 2016-01-13 Created: 2016-01-13 Last updated: 2016-03-30Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Mattsson, C. Mikael
By organisation
Department of Sport and Health Sciences
In the same journal
Physiological Genomics
PhysiologyMedical GeneticsSport and Fitness Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 215 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf