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Response of severely obese children and adolescents to behavioral treatment.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6058-4982
2012 (English)In: Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, ISSN 1072-4710, Vol. 166, no 12, 1103-1108 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate whether the degree of obesity predicts the efficacy of long-term behavioral treatment and to explore any interaction with age.

DESIGN:

A 3-year longitudinal observational study. Obese children were divided into 3 age groups (6-9, 10-13, and 14-16 years) and also into 2 groups (moderately obese, with a body mass index [BMI]-standard deviation [SD] score [or z score] of 1.6 to <3.5, and severely obese, with a BMI-SD score of ≥3.5).

SETTING:

National Childhood Obesity Center, Stockholm, Sweden.

PARTICIPANTS:

Children 6 to 16 years of age who started treatment between 1998 and 2006.

INTERVENTION:

Behavioral treatment of obesity.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Change in BMI-SD score during 3 years of treatment; a reduction in BMI-SD score of 0.5 units or more was defined as clinically significant.

RESULTS:

A total of 643 children (49% female children) met the inclusion criteria. Among the youngest moderately obese children, 44% had a clinically significant reduction in BMI-SD score (mean reduction, -0.4 [95% CI, -0.55 to -0.32]). Treatment was less effective for the older moderately obese children. Twenty percent of children who were 10 to 13 years of age and 8% of children who were 14 to 16 years of age had a reduction in BMI-SD score of 0.5 units or more; 58% of the severely obese young children showed a clinically significant reduction in BMI-SD score (mean reduction, -0.7 [95% CI, -0.80 to -0.54]). The severely obese adolescents showed no change in mean BMI-SD score after 3 years, and 2% experienced clinically significant weight loss. Age was found to be a predictor of a reduction in BMI-SD score (odds ratio, 0.68 units per year [95% CI, 0.60-0.77 units per year]).

CONCLUSIONS:

Behavioral treatment was successful for severely obese children but had almost no effect on severely obese adolescents.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 166, no 12, 1103-1108 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3876DOI: 10.1001/2013.jamapediatrics.319.PubMedID: 23108856OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-3876DiVA: diva2:826344
Available from: 2015-06-25 Created: 2015-06-25 Last updated: 2016-09-05Bibliographically approved

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