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Predictors of adolescent fitness levels among Swedish adolescents, a longitudinal study
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6058-4982
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2232-253X
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
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2012 (English)In: Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 2012, Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, S185- p.Conference paper, (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Introduction: It has been consistently demonstrated that low aerobic fitness is causally linked to increased cardio-metabolic risk. Aerobic fitness has also been causally related to cognitive function. From adolescence and onwards, the inter-individual stability ("tracking") in fitness is fairly high. An individual's fitness level in adolescence is therefore a central determinant for future health. However, childhood predictors of adolescent fitness levels are largely unknown. The present study aimed at identifying personal, school-specific and structural determinants in childhood (age 10 yrs) for adolescent aerobic fitness (at age 16 yrs).

Methods: Body mass index-based overweight status (normal weight vs overweight/obese, according to Cole et al.) and gross motor skills (based on the Tidén-Nyberg test) were measured at baseline in 209 Swedish children (mean [SD] age 9.8 [0.60] yrs) from randomly selected schools on Sweden. Immigration status (self-report) and average household income in quartiles on community level (register obtained) were used as possible structural confounders. Data on educational status of the PE teacher and lesson structure (gender-separated vs mixed classes) was obtained from the PE teacher. At the reexamination (at age 15.8 [0.33] yrs), aerobic fitness was estimated using the Åstrand-Ryhming nomogram. Low aerobic fitness was defined as below the first quartile (29.7 mL x min-1 x kg-1). Risk for low aerobic fitness was assessed using logistic regression

Results: Risk for low aerobic fitness at follow-up was lower in children who were normal weight (OR: 0.23.95% CI: 0.10 to 0.49) and in children with trained PE-teachers (OR: 0.40, 95% CI: 0.17 to 0.93), but higher among children with poor gross motor skills (OR:1.84, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.13) at baseline. Gender, immigration history, neighborhood economical status and lesson structure were all non-significant predictors of low adolescent fitness.

Discussion: The results stress the importance for early overweight prevention and treatment and for professional identification and treatment of children with impaired gross motor skills at young ages. In Sweden, a lagre proportion of PE-teachers in lower grades lack formal PE-teacher education, which according to the present study poses a threat to children's future health. Early screening and treatment of children with limited motor proficiencies seems may help children adapting a physically active lifestyle and avoiding low fitness levels in adolescence and young adulthood.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 15, no Supplement 1, S185- p.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences Public Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3749DOI: 10.1016/j.jsams.2012.11.449OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-3749DiVA: diva2:791033
Conference
Be Active 2012. Sydney, Australia
Available from: 2015-02-26 Created: 2015-02-26 Last updated: 2016-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Ekblom, ÖrjanKraepelien Strid, EvaTidén, AnnaNyberg, MarieSundblad, Gunilla BrunLundvall, Suzanne
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Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research groupDepartment of Sport and Health SciencesForskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur
Sport and Fitness SciencesPublic Health, Global Health, Social Medicine and Epidemiology

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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