Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Eccentric and concentric torque-velocity characteristics of the quadriceps femoris in man
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4030-5437
1988 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, ISSN 0301-5548, E-ISSN 1432-1025, Vol. 58, 100-104 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The primary purpose of this investigation was to study the eccentric and concentric torque-velocity characteristics of the quadriceps femoris in man using a recently developed combined isometric, concentric and eccentric controlled velocity dynamometer (the SPARK System). A secondary purpose was to compare the method error associated with maximal voluntary concentric and eccentric torque output over a range of testing velocities. 21 males (21-32 years) performed on two separate days maximal voluntary isometric, concentric and eccentric contractions of the quadriceps femoris at 4 isokinetic lever arm velocities of 0 degree.s-1 (isometric), 30 degrees.s-1, 120 degrees.s-1 and 270 degrees.s-1. Eccentric peak torque and angle-specific torques (measured every 10 degrees from 30 degrees to 70 degrees) did not significantly change from 0 degrees.s-1 to 270 degrees.s-1 (p greater than 0.005) with the exception of angle-specific 40 degrees torque, which significantly increased; p less than 0.05). The mean method error was significantly higher for the eccentric tests (10.6% +/- 1.6%) than for the concentric tests (8.1% +/- 1.7%) (p less than 0.05). The mean method error decreased slightly with increasing concentric velocity (p greater than 0.05), and increased slightly with increasing eccentric velocity (p greater than 0.05). A tension restricting neural mechanism, if active during maximal eccentric contractions, could possibly account for the large difference seen between the present eccentric torque-velocity results and the classic results obtained from isolated animal muscle.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1988. Vol. 58, 100-104 p.
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-409OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-409DiVA: diva2:774
Available from: 2008-06-04 Created: 2008-06-04 Last updated: 2017-03-31Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Seger, JanEkblom, Björn
By organisation
Department of Sport and Health SciencesBjörn Ekblom's research group
In the same journal
European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology
Physiology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 131 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf