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Running on land and in water: comparative exercise physiology
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.
1992 (English)In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 24, no 10, 1155-1160 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The effect of water immersion on cardiorespiratory and blood lactate responses during running was investigated. Wearing a buoyant vest, 10 trained runners (mean age 26 yr) ran in water at four different and specified submaximal loads (target heart rates 115, 130, 145, and 155-160 beats.min-1) and at maximal exercise intensity. Oxygen uptakes (VO2), heart rates, perceived exertion, and blood lactate concentrations were measured. Values were compared with levels obtained during treadmill running. For a given VO2, heart rate was 8-11 beats.min-1 lower during water running than during treadmill running, irrespective of exercise intensity. Both the maximal oxygen uptake (4.03 vs 4.60 1 x min-1) and heart rate (172 vs 188 beats.min-1) were lower during water running. Perceived exertion (legs and breathing) and the respiratory exchange ratio (RER) were higher during submaximal water running than during treadmill running, while ventilation (1 x min-1) was similar. The blood lactate concentrations were consistently higher in water than on the treadmill, both when related to VO2 and to %VO2max. Partly in conformity with earlier cycle ergometer studies, these data suggest that immersion induces acute cardiac adjustments that extend up to the maximal exercise level. Furthermore, both the external hydrostatic load and an altered running technique may add to an increased anaerobic metabolism during supported water running.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1992. Vol. 24, no 10, 1155-1160 p.
National Category
Physiology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-407OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-407DiVA: diva2:772
Available from: 2008-06-04 Created: 2008-06-04 Last updated: 2011-05-12Bibliographically approved

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