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Physiological responses to maximal intensity intermittent exercise
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4030-5437
1992 (English)In: European Journal of Applied Physiology and Occupational Physiology, ISSN 0301-5548, E-ISSN 1432-1025, Vol. 65, 144-149 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Physiological responses to repeated bouts of short duration maximal-intensity exercise were evaluated. Seven male subjects performed three exercise protocols, on separate days, with either 15 (S15), 30 (S30) or 40 (S40) m sprints repeated every 30 s. Plasma hypoxanthine (HX) and uric acid (UA), and blood lactate concentrations were evaluated pre- and postexercise. Oxygen uptake was measured immediately after the last sprint in each protocol. Sprint times were recorded to analyse changes in performance over the trials. Mean plasma concentrations of HX and UA increased during S30 and S40 (P less than 0.05), HX increasing from 2.9 (SEM 1.0) and 4.1 (SEM 0.9), to 25.4 (SEM 7.8) and 42.7 (SEM 7.5) mumol.l-1, and UA from 372.8 (SEM 19) and 382.8 (SEM 26), to 458.7 (SEM 40) and 534.6 (SEM 37) mumol.l-1, respectively. Postexercise blood lactate concentrations were higher than pretest values in all three protocols (P less than 0.05), increasing to 6.8 (SEM 1.5), 13.9 (SEM 1.7) and 16.8 (SEM 1.1) mmol.l-1 in S15, S30 and S40, respectively. There was no significant difference between oxygen uptake immediately after S30 [3.2 (SEM 0.1) l.min-1] and S40 [3.3 (SEM 0.4) l.min-1], but a lower value [2.6 (SEM 0.1) l.min-1] was found after S15 (P less than 0.05). The time of the last sprint [2.63 (SEM 0.04) s] in S15 was not significantly different from that of the first [2.62 (SEM 0.02) s]. However, in S30 and S40 sprint times increased from 4.46 (SEM 0.04) and 5.61 (SEM 0.07) s (first) to 4.66 (SEM 0.05) and 6.19 (SEM 0.09) s (last), respectively (P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1992. Vol. 65, 144-149 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-390OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-390DiVA: diva2:754
Available from: 2008-06-04 Created: 2008-06-04 Last updated: 2017-03-31Bibliographically approved

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