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The relationship of basic need satisfaction, motivational climate and personality to well-being and stress patterns among elite athletes: An explorative study
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
Indiana University-Bloomington.
2015 (English)In: Motivation and Emotion, ISSN 0146-7239, E-ISSN 1573-6644, Vol. 39, no 2, 237-246 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated whether need satisfaction, need dissatisfaction, motivational climate, perfectionism and self-esteem relate to athletes’ discrete profiles of hedonic and eudaimonic well-being and perceived stress. Participants were 103 elite active orienteers (49 men and 54 women; mean age = 22.3 ± 4.4) who clustered into three distinctive well-being and stress patterns: Cluster 1 (lower well-being/higher stress; n = 26), Cluster 2 (higher well-being/lower stress; n = 39), and Cluster 3 (moderate well-being/moderate stress; n = 36). Cluster 1 and 2 constituted distinct well-being/stress profiles and differed significantly (p < .01) in mastery-oriented climate, need satisfaction, need dissatisfaction, perfectionistic concerns and self-esteem scores. A discriminant analysis showed these five variables to correctly assign 88 % of Cluster 1 and 2 participants into their respective groups, although mastery-oriented climate was revealed as a less influential indicator (function loading <.40). The substantial function loading of need dissatisfaction supports the importance of assessing both need satisfaction and dissatisfaction as they contribute uniquely to well-being.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer , 2015. Vol. 39, no 2, 237-246 p.
Keyword [en]
Positive psychology, Elite orienteers, Mental health, Psychological functioning, Emotions
National Category
Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-3460DOI: 10.1007/s11031-014-9444-zOAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-3460DiVA: diva2:749382
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in Sports
Available from: 2014-09-23 Created: 2014-09-23 Last updated: 2017-12-05Bibliographically approved

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