Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Development of movement skills among Swedish children and adolescents – a longitudinal study
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2232-253X
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH.
2011 (English)Conference paper (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Development of movement skills among Swedish children and adolescents – a longitudinal study

Anna Tidén, Marie Nyberg

The Swedish School of Sport and health sciences

To develop a broad repertoire of gross motor skill in the early school years seams important. Children’s movements and play contributes to both social and physical development. To develop and to master a wide range of movements skills seams also contribute to better self-esteem and a higher physical self worth. The gross motor skills and coordinative skills are also a solid ground for sports and other physical and health activities.

The Swedish curriculum for PE stipulates that the students should master the gross motor skills in the 5th school year.

The motor skill study is a part of a Swedish multi-disciplinary project called School- Sport-Health and started in 2001 and data has been gathered 2001, 2004, 2007 and 2010. The aim of motor skill study in 2001 was to investigate how students in the age of 10, 13 and 16 managed in 16 different motor skills such as skipping, jumping, crawling, rolling, balancing, bouncing, throwing and catching a ball and also combination of these skills.

The results have been analyzed using SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) and results from 2001 indicate that 29% of the pupils in the 6th school year are not able to manage the gross motor skill tests without remarks. The pupils with the lowest scores can be found among young female children with low strength and overweight. The test also shows that in the 9th school year boys are stronger than girls. Boys and girls in the lower ages (school year 3 and 6) are more similar in the gross motor skills profile but not on the single movement level. It can also be noted that girls are better in skipping and some of the movements of more gymnastic character whereas boys are better in throwing balls and beanbags. Boys and girls have nearly identical results in the test of balance, walking on a balance beam where gender or age does not seem to have any affect. In the following up study of the 10 year old students in 2007 the results shows that if a student mastered the motor skills in 2001 they also did it six years later (there where only 10% risk to lower the score). The scores do also correlate with the student’s strength, the stronger they are the higher scores on the skills test. Among the students who had a high BMI in 2001 only 20% had developed their motor skills to a sufficient level.

The study is ongoing and during 2010 the participants from 2001 and 2007 have answered a questionnaire relating to social background, physical education, sports and leisure time activities and perceived health. The incoming results from the questionnaires will be discussed in relation to the motor skills results in a socio-cultural perspective.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keyword [en]
movement skills, children, school, Physical Education
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-2473OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-2473DiVA: diva2:568116
Conference
BERA, British Educational Research Association, London 2011, September 6-8th
Available from: 2012-11-15 Created: 2012-11-15 Last updated: 2015-12-07Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

http://www.bera.ac.uk/events/conference-archive/annual-conference-2011

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Tidén, AnnaNyberg, Marie
By organisation
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH
Pedagogy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 126 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf