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Dietary inorganic nitrate improves mitochondrial efficiency in humans.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1343-8656
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.
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2011 (English)In: Cell Metabolism, ISSN 1550-4131, Vol. 13, no 2, 149-159 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Nitrate, an inorganic anion abundant in vegetables, is converted in vivo to bioactive nitrogen oxides including NO. We recently demonstrated that dietary nitrate reduces oxygen cost during physical exercise, but the mechanism remains unknown. In a double-blind crossover trial we studied the effects of a dietary intervention with inorganic nitrate on basal mitochondrial function and whole-body oxygen consumption in healthy volunteers. Skeletal muscle mitochondria harvested after nitrate supplementation displayed an improvement in oxidative phosphorylation efficiency (P/O ratio) and a decrease in state 4 respiration with and without atractyloside and respiration without adenylates. The improved mitochondrial P/O ratio correlated to the reduction in oxygen cost during exercise. Mechanistically, nitrate reduced the expression of ATP/ADP translocase, a protein involved in proton conductance. We conclude that dietary nitrate has profound effects on basal mitochondrial function. These findings may have implications for exercise physiology- and lifestyle-related disorders that involve dysfunctional mitochondria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011. Vol. 13, no 2, 149-159 p.
National Category
Physiology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-1805DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cmet.2011.01.004PubMedID: 21284982OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-1805DiVA: diva2:415231
Available from: 2011-05-06 Created: 2011-05-06 Last updated: 2017-03-31Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Dietary inorganic nitrate: role in exercise physiology, cardiovascular and metabolic regulation
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Dietary inorganic nitrate: role in exercise physiology, cardiovascular and metabolic regulation
2011 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule with a vast number of tasks in the body, including regulation of cardiovascular and metabolic function. A decreased bioavailability of NO is a central event in disorders such as hypertension and metabolic syndrome. NO is also important in the regulation of blood flow and metabolism during exercise. The production of NO has previously been thought to be under the exclusive control of the nitric oxide synthases (NOS) but this view is now being seriously challenged. Recent lines of research suggest the existence of an NO-synthase independent pathway in which the supposedly inert NO oxidation products nitrate (NO3-) and nitrite (NO2-) can be reduced back to NO in blood and tissues. An important additional source of nitrate is our everyday diet and certain vegetables are particularly rich in this anion. In this thesis the possibility that dietary derived nitrate is metabolized in vivo to form reactive nitrogen oxides with NO-like bioactivity has been explored. It is shown that nitrate in amounts easily achieved via the diet, increases the systemic levels of nitrite and reduces blood pressure in healthy humans. Moreover, nitrate reduces whole body oxygen cost during submaximal and maximal exercise; a surprising effect involving improvement in mitochondrial efficiency and reduced expression of specific mitochondrial proteins regulating proton conductance. Alterations in the mitochondrial affinity for oxygen can explain this reduction in both submaximal and maximal oxygen consumption and predicts basal metabolic rate in humans. Finally, in mice lacking endothelial NO synthase, dietary supplementation with nitrate could reverse several features of the metabolic syndrome that develop in these animals. These studies demonstrate that dietary nitrate can fuel a nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway with important implications for cardiovascular and metabolic functions in health and disease.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Solna: Karolinska Institutet, 2011
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-2079 (URN)978-91-7457-397-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2011-06-17, Aulan Farmakologen, Nanna Svartz väg 2, Solna, 09:00 (English)
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Note
Avhandling vid Karolinska Institutet och Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIHAvailable from: 2012-01-09 Created: 2012-01-09 Last updated: 2016-08-08Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
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