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Effects of oral contraceptives on body composition and physical performance in female athletes.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's and Mats Börjesson's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4030-5437
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2004 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, ISSN 0021-972X, E-ISSN 1945-7197, Vol. 89, no 9, 4364-70 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Menstrual disturbances are common among female athletes, and oral contraceptives (OCs) are often recommended as estrogen substitution. However, there is little information about the effects of OC use in athletes, and there is great concern that OCs might impair physical performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of OC use on body composition and physical performance in female athletes. Twenty-six endurance athletes (13 with oligo-/amenorrhea and 13 regularly menstruating athletes) and 12 sedentary controls were examined before and after 10 months of treatment with a low dose, monophasic, combined OC. Significant changes in body composition were recorded in the athletes, but not in the controls. There was an increase in weight and fat mass only in athletes with oligo-/amenorrhea. These changes were associated with a decrease in ovarian androgens. OC treatment also increased bone mineral density, with the largest increase in athletes with a low bone mineral density at baseline. Despite significant changes in body composition, little impact on physical performance was recorded. We have demonstrated that OC treatment in female athletes has predominantly beneficial effects on body composition without adverse effects on physical performance and could be used for the prevention of osteoporosis in athletic amenorrhea. However, it cannot be excluded that a marked increase in fat mass might have unfavorable effects for athletic performance in individual women.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 89, no 9, 4364-70 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-976DOI: 10.1210/jc.2003-031334PubMedID: 15328063OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-976DiVA: diva2:236701
Available from: 2009-09-24 Created: 2009-09-24 Last updated: 2017-03-31Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
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