Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Maximal oxygen uptake is not limited by a central nervous system governor.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Björn Ekblom's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4030-5437
2007 (English)In: Journal of applied physiology, ISSN 8750-7587, E-ISSN 1522-1601, Vol. 102, no 2, 781-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We tested the hypothesis that the work of the heart was not a limiting factor in the attainment of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max). We measured cardiac output (Q) and blood pressures (BP) during exercise at two different rates of maximal work to estimate the work of the heart through calculation of the rate-pressure product, as a part of the ongoing discussion regarding factors limiting VO2 max. Eight well-trained men (age 24.4 +/- 2.8 yr, weight 81.3 +/- 7.8 kg, and VO2 max 59.1 +/- 2.0 ml x min(-1) x kg(-1)) performed two maximal combined arm and leg exercises, differing 10% in watts, with average duration of time to exhaustion of 4 min 50 s and 3 min 40 s, respectively. There were no differences between work rates in measured VO2 max, maximal Q, and peak heart rate between work rates (0.02 l/min, 0.3 l/min, and 0.8 beats/min, respectively), but the systolic, diastolic, and calculated mean BP were significantly higher (19, 5, and 10 mmHg, respectively) in the higher than in the lower maximal work rate. The products of heart rate times systolic or mean BP and Q times systolic or mean BP were significantly higher (3,715, 1,780, 569, and 1,780, respectively) during the higher than the lower work rate. Differences in these four products indicate a higher mechanical work of the heart on higher than lower maximal work rate. Therefore, this study does not support the theory, which states that the work of the heart, and consequently VO2 max, during maximal exercise is hindered by a command from the central nervous system aiming at protecting the heart from being ischemic.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2007. Vol. 102, no 2, 781-6 p.
National Category
Medical and Health Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-972DOI: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00566.2006PubMedID: 17068219OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-972DiVA: diva2:236688
Available from: 2009-09-24 Created: 2009-09-24 Last updated: 2017-03-31Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMedLink to Free Full Text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Ekblom, Björn
By organisation
Björn Ekblom's research group
In the same journal
Journal of applied physiology
Medical and Health Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 93 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf