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Directional anxiety responses in elite and sub-elite young athletes:: Intensity of anxiety symptoms matter
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Sport Psychology research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9921-6586
Indiana University-Bloomington.
2011 (English)In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, no 6, 853-862 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The objective was to examine the differences in anxiety ratings of elite and sub-elite athletes when the relationship between intensity and direction scores of anxiety ratings is considered in analyses. Participants were 31 junior elite (Mean age: 17.7, SD = 1.1) and 53 sub-elite (Mean age: 17.5 years, SD = 1.1) cross-country skiers and swimmers who completed the direction modified CSAI-2R before important competitions. Results showed that elite athletes  rated a higher percent of items as facilitative to their performance whereas sub-elite athletes rated a higher percent of items as debilitative. No significant differences between the elite and sub-elite samples were displayed regarding rated direction scores of cognitive or somatic anxiety at moderate to high intensity levels. A significant difference in facilitative anxiety ratings was displayed at a low anxiety intensity level (Z = -2.20, p < .05). Outcome performance data showed no consistent congruence with athletes’ anxiety direction ratings. The findings suggest that facilitative direction scores are a consequence of low anxiety intensity, possibly combined with high self-confidence levels. Directional anxiety researchers analysing separate total scores of intensity and direction respectively, which is the traditional approach, may draw incorrect conclusions about the importance of facilitative ratings of anxiety symptoms.  

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons , 2011. Vol. 21, no 6, 853-862 p.
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-878DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01102.xPubMedID: 22126716OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-878DiVA: diva2:212309
Available from: 2009-04-21 Created: 2009-04-21 Last updated: 2016-10-11Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textPubMedhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1600-0838.2010.01102.x/full

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CiteExportLink to record
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