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In vivo measurement of the effect of intra-abdominal pressure on the human spine.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8668-8755
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
2001 (English)In: Journal of Biomechanics, ISSN 0021-9290, E-ISSN 1873-2380, Vol. 34, no 3, 347-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In humans, intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) is elevated during many everyday activities. This experiment aimed to investigate the extent to which increased IAP--without concurrent activity of the abdominal or back extensor muscles--produces an extensor torque. With subjects positioned in side lying on a swivel table with its axis at L3, moments about this vertebral level were measured when IAP was transiently increased by electrical stimulation of the diaphragm via the phrenic nerve. There was no electromyographic activity in abdominal and back extensor muscles. When IAP was increased artificially to approximately 15% of the maximum IAP amplitude that could be generated voluntarily with the trunk positioned in flexion, a trunk extensor moment (approximately 6 Nm) was recorded. The size of the effect was proportional to the increase in pressure. The extensor moment was consistent with that predicted from a model based on measurements of abdominal cross-sectional area and IAP moment arm. When IAP was momentarily increased while the trunk was flexed passively at a constant velocity, the external torque required to maintain the velocity was increased. These results provide the first in vivo data of the amplitude of extensor moment that is produced by increased IAP. Although the net effect of this extensor torque in functional tasks would be dependent on the muscles used to increase the IAP and their associated flexion torque, the data do provide evidence that IAP contributes, at least in part, to spinal stability.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 34, no 3, 347-53 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-844PubMedID: 11182126OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-844DiVA: diva2:174924
Available from: 2009-02-26 Created: 2009-02-26 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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