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Intra-abdominal pressure changes during natural movements in man.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3612-449X
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
1978 (English)In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 103, no 3, 275-83 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The weight of the upper part of the trunk is partially transmitted to the pelvis via the vertebral column. If the muscle walls around the abdominal cavity are contracted, a high pressure can be generated within the cavity (greater than 200 mmHg). The abdominal space can them transmit part of weight to, e.g., the upper part of the body, Intra-abdominal pressure recordings have been performed during locomotion and other natural movements with intragastric pressure recordings. With each step, there is a phasic variation in pressure, with its peak coinciding with that of the peak vertical force exerted by the leg against the ground. The peak values increase progressively with the speed of walking/running up to a mean of 38 mmHg and with trough values of 16 mmHg. The phasic variations with each step is due to a phasic activation of the abdominal muscles, with an EMG activity starting 50 ms or more before foot contact. If an extra load is put on the back, the posture changes and at the highest speed of running the pressure values are significantly higher than without this additional load. After a jump down from a moderate height of 0.4 m, the average increase is 89 mmHg and can often exceed 100 mmHg. These pressure changes are large and will presumably act to unload the spine under the prevailing biomechanical conditions and, in addition, there will no doubt be an effect on the circulatory system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1978. Vol. 103, no 3, 275-83 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-833PubMedID: 153084OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-833DiVA: diva2:174802
Available from: 2009-02-25 Created: 2009-02-24 Last updated: 2016-11-17Bibliographically approved

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