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Lumbar back muscle activity during locomotion: effects of voluntary modifications of normal trunk movements.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3612-449X
1988 (English)In: Acta Physiologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6772, E-ISSN 1365-201X, Vol. 133, no 3, 343-53 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The mechanisms of adaptation of the trunk to changed mechanical conditions were studied during locomotion in man. The myoelectrical (EMG) activity in lumbar back muscles and the movements of the trunk were recorded in nine healthy subjects during walking and running on a motor-driven treadmill. Two different types of voluntary modifications of the movement pattern were used: (1) The trunk was kept in an extreme forward or backward tilted position. In both these situations the basic EMG pattern with two periods of activity per stride cycle was maintained during walking, whereas a major shift relative to the stride cycle (25% of the stride cycle duration) occurred in running with the trunk tilted backwards. The synchrony of the back muscle activation at both sides increased when locomotion was performed with the trunk tilted forwards. The relative duration of the EMG bursts was similar to normal locomotion and corresponded to 15-26% of the stride cycle duration in walking and 23-37% in running. (2) In the other type of modification the subjects were instructed to exaggerate the angular trunk movements either in the sagittal or in the frontal plane. The basic EMG pattern and phase relationships remained in most cases unchanged. One exception was running with exaggerated lateral movements, in which only one period of back muscle activity per stride cycle was observed. The relative duration of the bursts was longer in trials with exaggerated trunk movements as compared to normal locomotion. In walking and running with the trunk tilted forwards or backwards the lumbar back muscles were not always involved as prime movers of the trunk. This was in contrast to the more dynamic situations, in which the back muscle activity appeared to be directly involved in braking and reversing the exaggerated trunk movements.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
1988. Vol. 133, no 3, 343-53 p.
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-826PubMedID: 3227927OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-826DiVA: diva2:174789
Available from: 2009-02-25 Created: 2009-02-24 Last updated: 2016-11-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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