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Sitting balance and effects of kayak training in paraplegics.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Laboratory for Biomechanics and Motor Control. Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, The Laboratory of Applied Sports Science (LTIV).ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8161-5610
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2004 (English)In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 36, no 3, 110-6 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate biomechanical variables related to balance control in sitting, and the effects of kayak training, in individuals with spinal cord injury. SUBJECTS: Twelve individuals with spinal cord injury were investigated before and after an 8-week training period in open sea kayaking, and 12 able-bodied subjects, who did not train, served as controls. METHODS: Standard deviation and mean velocity of centre of pressure displacement, and median frequency of centre of pressure acceleration were measured in quiet sitting in a special chair mounted on a force plate. RESULTS: All variables differed between the group with spinal cord injury, before training, and the controls; standard deviation being higher and mean velocity and median frequency lower in individuals with spinal cord injury. A significant training effect was seen only as a lowering of median frequency. CONCLUSION: The results indicate that individuals with spinal cord injury may have acquired and consolidated an alternative strategy for balance control in quiet sitting allowing for only limited further adaptation even with such a vigorous training stimulus as kayaking.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2004. Vol. 36, no 3, 110-6 p.
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Medical and Health Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-759PubMedID: 15209453OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-759DiVA: diva2:174541
Available from: 2009-02-23 Created: 2009-02-16 Last updated: 2017-03-01Bibliographically approved

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Bjerkefors, AnnaRosdahl, HansThorstensson, Alf
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