Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

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Exploring Movement Composition in the transition from physical education teacher education to school PE
Örebro University, School of Health Sciences, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1773-7792
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Sciences and School of Teacher Education, Falun, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4660-717X
Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Sciences and School of Teacher Education, Falun, Sweden.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Movement, Culture and Society.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8748-8843
2022 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

Background: Scholars have suggested that students’ views of what isimportant for them to know as Physical Education (PE) teachers are aresult of what is assessed in Physical Education Teacher Education(PETE). Thus, there is a risk that students will reproduce content areassuch as sports and assess sport-techniques without much criticalconsideration. In this study, however, the risk of reproducing what isprioritised in PETE is seen as an opportunity regarding the potentialreproduction of other content areas than sports. Based on theregulative principles of PE and PETE that privilege sport skills andhinder creative movement learning, we focus on a content area in PETE that provides opportunities for students to engage in creative collaboration and examine how this content area is realised in schoolPE. Hence, we have chosen to explore ‘Movement Composition’, acontent area which has a long tradition at one of the PETE universitiesin Sweden. Based on an overarching interest in whether and how PETEmatters, this exploratory study focuses on the potential transferability ofMovement Composition as a particular content area in the transitionfrom PETE to PE.Purpose and research question: The purpose of this study is to exploreMovement Composition as a content area undergoing the transition fromPETE to school PE. The research question is: How is the pedagogicdiscourse of Movement Composition constructed, recontextualised andrealised in the transition from PETE to school PE?Methods: Data was generated through an interview with one of theinitiators of Movement Composition. Stimulated Recall interviews andZoom interviews were also conducted with a group of five PETEstudents and three experienced PE teachers. In addition, documentssuch as the study guide, course literature, and written assignmentsassociated with Movement Composition in the PETE programme wereincluded in the empirical material. In the analysis, the combination ofBernstein’s pedagogic device and the Swedish didactics of PE researchtradition was used to identify the pedagogic discourse of MovementComposition in the transition from PETE to school PE.Findings: The findings show how the pedagogic discourse of MovementComposition as a content area is constructed, recontextualised and realisedin the transition from PETE to school PE. The construction of MovementComposition as a pedagogic discourse in PETE is about how thecontent area (the what) is selected and organised for pedagogicalpurposes. The recontextualisation of Movement Composition is abouthow the pedagogic discourse is interpreted and translated in relation tothe PE syllabus. The realisation of Movement Composition involves howthe content area in PETE is implemented in PE practice.Conclusions: This exploratory study has shown that what is articulated asa relevant content area and the way it is taught, learned, and assessed inPETE in many regards survives the transition to school PE. The transitionfrom PETE to school PE does not only involve reproduction of sportsand sport-techniques from one context to another. PETE alsocontributes to the use of creative, collaborative, and student-centredlearning tasks in school PE.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis Group, 2022. p. 1-15
National Category
Educational Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-7451DOI: 10.1080/17408989.2022.2153818ISI: 000898260200001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-7451DiVA, id: diva2:1721412
Funder
Swedish Research CouncilAvailable from: 2022-12-21 Created: 2022-12-21 Last updated: 2023-01-11Bibliographically approved

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Tolgfors, BjörnBackman, ErikQuennerstedt, Mikael
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