Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH

Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
‘Free but not free-free’: teaching creative aspects of dance in physical education teacher education
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Movement, Culture and Society.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8284-5872
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Movement, Culture and Society. Department of Food and Nutrition, and Sport Sciences, Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1298-8186
School of Health Sciences, University of Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-4162-9844
2023 (English)In: Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy, ISSN 1740-8989, E-ISSN 1742-5786, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 617-629Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background

There is a global consensus that stimulating and fostering children’s creativity in education is crucial. Addressing creativity has become an imperative in educational policies and in school curricula internationally. School-based physical education (PE), and specifically the teaching area of dance, has been identified as an important pedagogical setting within which to develop creativity. Existing studies have suggested, however, that dance is seldom taught in PE in ways that acknowledge creative aspects of movement learning. Scholars have claimed that teaching pre-arranged dances with predetermined movement outcomes dominate dance teaching in PE. Furthermore, studies have asserted that the overarching regulative principles of PE and PETE that privilege sport skills and physical exercise hinder creative movement learning. Still, dance teaching is frequently seen as part of expressive dance teaching in PE and PETE and is regarded as holding potential in the area of education for creativity. Little scholarly attention has been given to how teacher educators approach creative aspects in dance teaching.

Purpose

This article aims to create insights into how PETE teacher educators understand and work with creative aspects of dance in their educational practice.

Method and theory

To address our aim, we investigate how teacher educators describe their teaching of creative aspects of dance. To do this, empirical material was generated through qualitative interviews with PE teacher educators from each of the PETE institutions in Sweden. The theoretical concepts of smooth and striated spaces and experimentation by Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari were used to guide the analysis of how the PETE educators described their teaching of creative aspects of dance. Deleuze and Guattari developed a framework that concerned questions of creativity and newness. Despite this conceptual framework having not yet been used in dance education in PE and PETE, their writing fits well when analysing questions of creativity in an educational context.

Findings

We identified three major themes relating to creativity in the empirical material: (a) creative aspects of expressive dance; (b) challenges that teacher educators face when introducing movement exploration in expressive dance to their students, and; (c) the teacher educators’ pedagogical work with students.

Discussion

The results of this study show that teaching expressive dance can take teaching in PE and PETE in new directions. The results provide insights into alternative ways of teaching in these educational settings that can counter the dominant ways of teaching dance. Results suggest that teacher educators operate in various striated spaces that are shaped by expectations and conventions. In such spaces, the educators aim to create momentary passages of smoothening that open up for experimentation and the development of students’ creativity. The results also suggest that expressive dance in PE and PETE emphasizes creative movement learning through which students learn to operate within new and unpredictable situations.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Taylor & Francis, 2023. Vol. 28, no 6, p. 617-629
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6894DOI: 10.1080/17408989.2021.2014435ISI: 000734226800001OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-6894DiVA, id: diva2:1624488
Funder
Swedish Research Council, 2017-03685Available from: 2022-01-04 Created: 2022-01-04 Last updated: 2023-10-05

Open Access in DiVA

fulltext(1536 kB)360 downloads
File information
File name FULLTEXT01.pdfFile size 1536 kBChecksum SHA-512
fa3d3672320dd1acea0b80bd467946b560db4922afaac1e4f84b392e187430a4d3480d840062e8504a8298950954f046ad46f5ba2db1b7bbfb61bf1afc77fbaf
Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

Other links

Publisher's full text

Authority records

Engdahl, ChristopherLundvall, Suzanne

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Engdahl, ChristopherLundvall, SuzanneBarker, Dean
By organisation
Department of Movement, Culture and Society
In the same journal
Physical Education and Sport Pedagogy
Pedagogy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar
Total: 360 downloads
The number of downloads is the sum of all downloads of full texts. It may include eg previous versions that are now no longer available

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 435 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf