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The construction and legitimizing of a neuroscience concept (CEF) in talent identification
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogisk idrottsforskning.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8684-3724
Mälardalens högskola.
2020 (English)In: The European Association for the Philosophy of Sport (EAPS) Conference 2020 / [ed] Bernard Andrieu, Paris: British Philosophy of Sport Association , 2020Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Recent scientific debate in sports has come to focus on how neuroscience can help in explaining sports performance and the development of expertise; and in the process of talent identification. It has been argued that instead of relying on coaches’ subjective assessments the process of selection should be based on general metrics of the brain through standardized testing.

 

Cognitive executive functions (CEF) are highlighted as one of most important neurological function in the search for talents. Studies of brain activity have suggested that children should undergo neuroscientific testing to determine the appropriate cognitive executive functions (CEF) for elite sports. This presentation builds on previous work on the implications of a neuroscientific ontology in sports and Bruno Latour’s work on the construction of scientific facts.

 

Using discourse analysis, the presentation discusses the production and popularization of CEF as scientific facts. In our findings we identify how representations of brain activity are visualized and legitimized and how the out-of-context tests are translated into facts about brain functions. The CEF test results are produced as inscriptions of undisputable facts, claiming that the results show prerequisites for sporting success. On the contrary, we argue that the mind-brain-behaviour relationship cannot be reduced to CEF tests. Instead, we urge other researchers to direct a critical gaze on neuroscientific truth-claims and taken-for-granted facts in the area of sport in general and in talent selection in particular.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Paris: British Philosophy of Sport Association , 2020.
Keywords [en]
Cognitive executive functions; brain; talent selection; discourse analysis
National Category
Other Social Sciences
Research subject
Social Sciences/Humanities
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6089OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-6089DiVA, id: diva2:1415421
Conference
The European Association for the Philosophy of Sport (EAPS) Conference 2020
Available from: 2020-03-18 Created: 2020-03-18 Last updated: 2020-03-20Bibliographically approved

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Kilger & Blomberg 2020(188 kB)6 downloads
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Type fulltextMimetype application/pdf

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Kilger, Magnus

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
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  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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