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Mitochondrial oxygen affinity increases after sprint interval training and is related to the improvement in peak oxygen uptake.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Research group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1343-8656​
Karolinska insitutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
University of Applied Sciences for Police and Administration of Hesse, Wiesbaden, Germany.
University of Lausanne, Lausanne, Switzerland.
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2020 (English)In: Acta Physiologica, ISSN 1748-1708, E-ISSN 1748-1716, article id e13463Article in journal (Refereed) Epub ahead of print
Abstract [en]

AIMS: The body responds to exercise training by profound adaptations throughout the cardiorespiratory and muscular systems, which may result in improvements in maximal oxygen consumption (VO2 peak) and mitochondrial capacity. By convenience, mitochondrial respiration is often measured at supra-physiological oxygen levels, an approach that ignores any potential regulatory role of mitochondrial affinity for oxygen (p50mito ) at physiological oxygen levels.

METHODS: In this study, we examined the p50mito of mitochondria isolated from the Vastus lateralis and Triceps brachii in 12 healthy volunteers before and after a training intervention with 7 sessions of sprint interval training using both leg cycling and arm cranking. The changes in p50mito were compared to changes in whole-body VO2 peak.

RESULTS: We here show that p50mito is similar in isolated mitochondria from the Vastus (40 ± 3.8 Pa) compared to Triceps (39 ± 3.3) but decreases (mitochondrial oxygen affinity increases) after 7 sessions of sprint interval training (to 26 ± 2.2 Pa in Vastus and 22 ± 2.7 Pa in Triceps, both p<0.01). The change in VO2 peak modeled from changes in p50mito was correlated to actual measured changes in VO2 peak (R2 =0.41, p=0.002).

CONCLUSION: Together with mitochondrial respiratory capacity, p50mito is a critical factor when measuring mitochondrial function, it can decrease with sprint interval training and should be considered in the integrative analysis of the oxygen cascade from lung to mitochondria.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
John Wiley & Sons, 2020. article id e13463
Keywords [en]
Mitochondria, exercise, high intensity training, maximal oxygen consumption, oxygen affinity, sprint training, training
National Category
Sport and Fitness Sciences
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-6073DOI: 10.1111/apha.13463ISI: 000520574300001PubMedID: 32144872OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-6073DiVA, id: diva2:1414462
Available from: 2020-03-13 Created: 2020-03-13 Last updated: 2020-04-08Bibliographically approved

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Larsen, Filip J

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