Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Biphasic relationship between training load and glucose tolerance
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-8314-7814
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7743-9295
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Eva Blomstrand's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-1942-2919
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences, Åstrand Laboratory of Work Physiology, Björn Ekblom's research group.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4030-5437
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)Conference paper, Poster (with or without abstract) (Other academic)
Abstract [sv]

Biphasic relationship between training load and glucose tolerance

Nilsson, L, Flockhart M, Bergman K, Apro W, Ekblom B, Larsen FJ

 

There is a well-established construct regarding the positive effects of exercise on glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity, as well as muscle glycogen storage. In insulin resistance, physical activity is an essential part of the treatment. However, the optimal dose is unknown. Reduced muscular glycogen stores, resulting from exercise, should stimulate an increased uptake of blood glucose. In this study we investigated the relation between training load, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity during three weeks of increasing interval training. Three times during the intervention, oral glucose tests were conducted to investigate the rate of glucose uptake. We found a biphasic dose-response relationship between training load and glucose tolerance, where an excessive training load led to a paradoxical reduction in glucose tolerance and impaired insulin release despite an unchanged amount of muscle glycogen. In light of these results, an upper limit of physical exercise exist where the negative effects overpowers the positive.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019.
National Category
Cell Biology
Research subject
Medicine/Technology; Medicine/Technology; Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5933OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-5933DiVA, id: diva2:1374367
Conference
Cell Symposia, Exercise Metabolism. May 5-7 2019, Sitges Spain
Funder
Swedish National Centre for Research in SportsAvailable from: 2019-11-29 Created: 2019-11-29 Last updated: 2019-12-09Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Authority records BETA

Nilsson, LinaFlockhart, MikaelApro, WilliamEkblom, BjörnLarsen, Filip J

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Nilsson, LinaFlockhart, MikaelApro, WilliamEkblom, BjörnLarsen, Filip J
By organisation
Åstrand Laboratory of Work PhysiologyEva Blomstrand's research groupBjörn Ekblom's research groupResearch group for Mitokondriell funktion och metabolisk kontroll
Cell Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

urn-nbn

Altmetric score

urn-nbn
Total: 14 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf