Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
A bi-factor model of the Montgomery Åsberg depression rating scale and future cognitive impairments in older adults: A 6-year follow-up study.
University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
Karolinska institutet.
Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, GIH, Department of Sport and Health Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9426-7117
Karolinska institutet.
Show others and affiliations
2019 (English)In: Journal of Psychiatric Research, ISSN 0022-3956, E-ISSN 1879-1379, Vol. 109, p. 1-9, article id S0022-3956(18)30418-7Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Depression has been found to be associated with cognitive decline. This study evaluated the association of general depressive symptoms and motivational-related symptoms with cognitive impairment 6 years later and to explore the role of potential underlying mechanisms. In 2690 cognitively healthy persons aged ≥60 from the Swedish National study on Aging and Care in Kungsholmen (SNAC-K) depressive symptoms were derived from the Montgomery Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Cognitive performance was assessed at baseline and 6 years later in 1810 persons with the Mini Mental State Examination (global cognition), Digit Span Forward (short-term memory), Digit Span Backward (working memory), Clock-test (visuospatial construction), and the 5-item test (immediate and delayed recall). Bi-factor analysis on the MADRS yielded a General Depression factor and an unrelated Motivational factor. After adjusting for demographics, the General Depression factor was only associated with 6-year impairment in delayed recall (OR (95% CI): 1.18 (1.04-1.34)). This association was no longer significant after adjusting for demographics, cardiovascular risk, lifestyle factors and medication use. The Motivational factor was not significantly associated with future cognitive impairments after adjusting for demographics. Concluding, almost all associations of general depressive symptoms and motivational-related symptoms with future cognitive impairments appeared to be confounded by demographics. Only the association of general depressive symptoms with future memory impairments appeared to be explained by a combination of demographics, cardiovascular risk, lifestyle and medication use.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2019. Vol. 109, p. 1-9, article id S0022-3956(18)30418-7
Keywords [en]
Bifactor analysis, Cognitive impairments, Depression, Executive function, Memory, Motivational symptoms, Symptom profile
National Category
Psychiatry
Research subject
Medicine/Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:gih:diva-5477DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2018.11.010ISI: 000456761200001PubMedID: 30453181OAI: oai:DiVA.org:gih-5477DiVA, id: diva2:1264472
Available from: 2018-11-20 Created: 2018-11-20 Last updated: 2019-03-19Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textPubMed

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Pantzar, Alexandra
By organisation
Department of Sport and Health Sciences
In the same journal
Journal of Psychiatric Research
Psychiatry

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
pubmed
urn-nbn
Total: 782 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf